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The Massachusetts Collegian, Friday, June 23, 1922. 



o AF /r AT /AST IN THE WIDE, WIDE WORLD 

Or\~ L=. r\ I *-C yy ^ ' _ Man -Through your patronage we have been able to make this the 
And the Best of Luck and Success to EveTy ™" hackZ" reune" you'll always find here what's what for the 
leader of college stores, and ^""~ £" *£ £££ JZge/Zry season. Your summer needs can be 
Z^ZeTa'c^r^e^^^ aeaLut klces-'for ^ythingjustbe brand new ,„ * « 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS *£*%£ w 



COURSE OF STUDY 

Continued from ]>iii.'c 1 



in their report, be approved. 

1, That steps ln> taken to pui i""' 

operational the beginning ot the nexl 
college year aucfa modifications In the 

course ol study, baaed apoa the alu i 

reconitneadatloaa, as teeua Immediate!) 
feasible. The detalle of tbeeeebanges 
were referred i<> the Faculty Committee 
on Course <>f stu.lv with power. 

:!. Tbal there are certain eoasidera 
lions involved la the reorganisation ol 

i he eourae of study, especially o ;ern- 

log the fundamental objective* of the 
eourae <>t simlv. which should be given 
further study bj the Faculty Commit- 
tee on Course of Study, before they re- 
port fully upon needed changes In the 
ourrtoulum. 

following are I he recommendations 

of the alumni committee : 
l. That the work of ti><' Freshman 

year be Hit' same lot all students. 

1. That students lie required t<> elect 

their major group at I lie end of the 

Freshman year. 

:$. That tin' present system of having 
a large number of major oourae* be 
abolished. 

4. That there be a required, well 
balanced eourae of etudy for each major 
group. 

</. That the couraee f<>r the Jun- 
ior and Senior years, in the 
respective major groups be 
prescribed within very "ar- 
row limits, with a minimum 
of el. •.•lives, and thai the 
work be so planned as to lay 

a broad foundation for future 
development. 
h. That insofar as II is practi- 
cable, definite subject matter 

specialization lie restrict! d to 
Seniors. 
f>. Thai all major studies actually 
require the use of principles learned in 
prerequisite science courses. 

ti. That courses in English be re- 
quired of all students for each term of 
the four year course: that thorougli 
drill be given, especially iii composi- 
tion, public speaking and debating; 
and thai some means he provided which 
will require teachers of subjects other 

than Rugllefa to enforce the use of good 
English i" the students' daily work. 

7. That serious consideration he 
given tO the question Of whether mod- 
ern languages are serving their purpose 

8. That a general course la Agricul- 
ture and Horticulture, which will de- 
velop an appreciation of the possibili- 
ties for life work and service in tb* agri- 
cultural field, be given la the Preahman 
year. As the present system of teach- 
ing this course is I failure, the commit- 
tee recommends that this course be 

taught by one Instructor who is well 

qualified for the task. 

'». That a system of evaluating credit 
hours, which" will determine the true 
relative value of courses, lie adopted. 
The committee believes that the system 
in force al the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology will come as near aceom- 
pllahlag thl* end as any known method. 

10. That all so-called practical and 
technical courses in the four year 

course be subjected t<> the most rigid 

Scrutiny, and tbal courses which are of 

secondary school grade be excluded 
from the 'curriculum. Since thecoilege 
now oilers a two year course in agricul- 
ture, there can he a well defined line ol 
demarcation between the work of sec- 
ondary school and the work of true col- 
lege grade. 

11. That entrance requirements to 
the four vear course lie held lo a Stand- 
ard sufficiently high to enable thecoi- 
lege to give high grade collegiate work. 
The committee emphatically recom- 
mends that no lowering of the require- 
ments he permitted. 



H, That lo rCCtlfj the evident lack 

of coordination between departments, 
to insure effective melbode <>t teaching, 

and lo accomplish the desired ebaug 
in the curriculum, some one person 
made responsible for. and have as 
Chief duly the supervision and develop- 
n ,enl of the course of study. The coin 

mit recommend! Ibal the Dean ol 

ti,,. College he charged with this Im- 
port an I duty. 



he 

his 



'10.— Bay mood B. Wtlloagbby has 
■atered inland Stanford LTniveraitj toi 

a tail use in educational Administra- 
tion under Dr. Terinan. starting in work 

on June 21. 



F0LS0M INTERFRATERN1TY 

CONFERENCE PRESIDENT 
At the lael meeting ol i be loterfra- 

trinity Conference. Viee-l're-i. lent Owen 

K. Kelson, became President to take the 
pla.c ol Soger IJ. Friend, who has per- 
manently resigned from t be Conference. 
Donald B. Alexander, "B8, Sigma 

Kpsiloii, was elected Hit 

President, 



1 1 e W 



Pbl 

Vi.e- 



Prol.s-.oi 
announce 
daughter, 

Idle, 1921. 



and Mrs. Frank A. Waugb 
the engagemenl of Ihelr 
Bather, to Nathan VT. Gil- 



ALUMNI NOTES. 
]>r. T. H- Baton, a graduate student 
here In 1900-01, and now Professor in 
Agricultural Education at Cornell, re- 
cently app. and on Campus, and spent 

much lime with the Agricultural Edu- 
cational Department. He is visiting 
all tin- agricultural schools in the state, 

to sic what I hey are doing in 

of Agricultural Education, 

I. lief -lop here. 

i ». Theodore A. Nlcolel was mai 

vied .... June 17 to Miss Charlotte II 
Smith al New York City, ami tbeoottple 

will make their home at Rutland, Vi. 



the line 

no! made a 



rnnrn 



1 Hiniiiiiiiiimiii.,., 



nun 



It took 

yEARS^yEARS 

to develop 

CAMEL QUALITY 

We worked on Camels for years before we put them 
on the market. Years of testing— blending— experi- 
menting with the world's choicest tobaccos. 

And now, EVERY DAY, all our skill, manufactur- 
ing experience and lifelong knowledge of fine tobaccos 
are concentrated on making Camel the best cigarette 
that can be produced. 

There's nothing else like Camel QUALITY. And 
there's nothing else like Camels wonderful smoothness, 
fine tobacco flavor and FREEDOM FROM CIGA- 
RETTY AFTERTASTE. 

That's why Camel popularity is growing faster than 

ever. 

A better cigarette cannot be made. 

We put the utmost quality into 
THIS ONE BRAND. 




v of tl\k 

1922 




Agr 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 4, 1922. 



No. 1 



1926 LARGEST CLASS 

IN MANY YEARS 



Incoming Freshmen Number 169 Men 
and 20 Women. 



FAMOUS AGGIE LANDMARK SOPHOMORES GIVE WAY AND 
DESTROYED BY FIRE ARE PULLED THROUGH POND 



Adams. Kathleen 1* 
Aguilera, Laopoldo 

Alhertini. Caul F. 
Ahlrich, George S. 
Amen, Winthrop A. 
Amsden, Festus 6. 
\ i ii -de ii, Theodore If. 



Worcester 

Havana, Cuba 

Billerica 

Millville 

Vineyard Haven 

A l hoi 

Atbol 



Anderson, Leslie C. Kant Bridgewater 
Anthony, Stewart II. Manchester, X. II 



Ashe, Thomas | 
Avery, Clifford W. 
Avery, Raymond B. 
Backus, Heyworth 
Bakar, U ru u ek R. 
Baker, Frederic A. 
Barber, Klmer K. 
Barnes, Hussell N. 
Bartletl, Herbert F 
Beem, Merrill A. 
Belmore, George A. 
Berry, George H. 
Block, Harry W. 
Boswortti, Marguerite K. 
Bosworth, Maude K. 
Bower, James, Jr. 
Boyd, Mary T. 
Brougham, Karl (i. 
Itmortoii, Karle W. 
Brownell, Abbott F. 
Buckhout, Robert G 
Buckley, Arthur V. 
Budge, William K. 
Bumham, James K. 
Burrell, Robert W. 
Burt. Orea C, Jr. 



Holyoke 

Colrain 

Montgomery 

Centerville 

Bopk' .ton 

Springfield 

Janiica Plata 

Wallingford, Conn. 

West Springfield 

Portland, Me. 

Bridgewater 

Northampton 

Arlington 

Holyoke 

Holyoke 

Holyoke 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Holyoke 

Reading 

Xew York,X. V. 

South Hadley 

Batlek 

Mattapan 
Springfield 

AbtagtOB 

Baatbaapioa 



Site of Old Chem. Lab. Now But a 

Dirty Cellar-hole. Books and 

Some Apparatus Rescued by 

Professors. 

At last the objeei of many years scorn 
and derision is no more, for the chem- 
istry building which we left last June 
as a sentinel over the campus has been 
destroyed, and nothing now remains 
but the black and empty foundation of 
a building which was well-known to 
every Aggie man. We have demanded 
that the building be torn down, but 
now that it has gone we can not help 
but feel more than sorry that such a 
place, rich with the traditions of old 
Aggie and representing in its very sol- 
idarity the men who have graduated 
from and made a name for the institu- 
tion in the past, is destroyed forever. 

The lire started OS the morning ol 
.Sept. 6, the lirst alarm being given at 
rt-K,. There was a prompt arrival on 
the part of the lire apparatus, but the 
complete staff of the chemis'.ry. depart- 
ment made as <|iiiek an appearance and 
started at once to save the contents of 
the building. The lire originated in 
the physical chemistry laboratory, but 
Continued on page S 



By the Entering Men Who Make 

Fine Showing in Annual 

Rope-Pull. 

The tiring of the second pistol beside 
the Aggie pond last Saturday afternoon 
saw the members of the Class of IBM 
cutting away the waters of the pond 
wiih their chins after a hard-fought 
seven-minute battle. 

Due to the fact that many of the 
.Sophs were not allowed to take part 
their number was cut down lo forty- 
seven insteadof the allowed sixty so they 
were handicapped at the start. The 
weight on the Fieshman side was a little 
I.. Iter than (hat of their opponents but 
this was offset by the marshy condition 
oi the ground on 'he east side of the 
pond. 

This is the lirst time since IMS thai 
the incoming clash bai been able to 
pull its traditional enemies through the 
Baddy slime, and the fact will here- 
corded in many "M" book with a piece 
a shirt that did not gel wet. 



JOHN B. HANNA SECURED 
AS NEW STUDENT SCRETARY 



Continued on page 8 



VARSITY ELEVEN TAKES ON 
HEAVY TEAM AT CONN. AGGIE 



Coaches Relying Largely on Fast 

Strong Offensive to Start Off 

Season with a Win. 



ComeB Here With Experience and 

With a Definite Purpose 

in View. 

Mr. John B. Ilanua took up his 
duties at the opening ol college as M . 
A. C. Inteichurch Student Se< iclary on 
this campus. Mr. Ilanna fills a position 
here which has been much discussed in 
the i>ast, but it was BOt until this year 
that it seemed feasible to secure a man 
of his ability to carry on this work. 
At Monday morning <bapel he briefly 
told his reasons for being here. 

First of all he likes college men and 
women, and will try to help them in 
such ways as he may be able. He <!<• 
, rM to straighten out their religious 
beliefs which may have been disturbed 



Mass. Aggie goes to Connecticut Sat- 
urda to meet a team which from all re- 
ports outweighs them seriously. The 
Bay Slaters are also handicapped by the 
fact that their opponents have already 
weathered two games while they them- 

telvea are about to start the season, j i, y scientific teachings. He wishes also 
load. Core is depending on speed and , ,,, show the students that Christianity 
wide open plays with intricate forma- can be applied to industrial and loter- 
tions. Prof. Rice, coach of the back- ; national re'ations, and to create in them 
ii. 1.1 has developed a new offensive a desire to do this. 

,„. He is a strong exponent ot the Mr. Ilanna ll a graduate of Wesleyan 
open game and has given the Aggies an j in 1SU1 with the A. B. degree. He is a 
offense replete with laterals, forwards, farm bred boy from the state of New 
double and triple passes. The probable , York, thoroughly familiar with hard 
Haeuple: ! farmwork. He taught school for three 

Marshman, le ; Salmon, It [ Gleason, < years and then went to Union Theolog- 
lg; Alger, c; Xowers, rg : Mohor, rt ; ieal Seminary where he has graduated 
Ferranti. re; Beal, u ; Capluin Grayson with credit. For the last four years he 
sad Tumev, halves: and Sargent full, has been assistant Castor in one of the 
F.ighteen players will make the trip | big Brooklyn churches. In college tie 
accompanied by the manager, trainer, was a prominent fraternity man and 
and coaches interested in various phases of athletics 



FRESHMAN PLEDGES 

The following Freshmen, totalling 
just 53% of the male enrollment, were 
pledged in chapel Monday morning: 

I'lll SMJMA kappa 

K. Wesley Potter 

Francis J. Cormier 
Francis A. Baker 
Vincent Hennehury 
David J. Horner 
Wendell P.Bhedd 
James M. Richards 
Alfred McKay 
Walter Haynes 
Alton Quetafeou 
Lawrence Jones 

I.AMItl'A (III AI.IMIA 

Leslie Anderson 
John Lambert 
James Hurnham 
Charles Reed 
Loren Sniffen 

Roy rforeroei 



FOOTBALL SQUAD ROUNDING 
INTO SHAPE WITH 45 MEN 

Team Lighter Than Most of Oppo- 
nents. Many More Candidates 
Still Needed. 

About :t. r > men were back two weeks 
early lor the grind which precedes 
every football season. They have been 
slowly augmented in number until 
about If men are on the sipiad, but 
there is still an alarming dearth of 
material. Coach Bote needs many 
more men to play on the second learn. 
Without them the (earn will be 
seriously handicapped. 

Previous to the opening of college 
practices were held three times a day- 
morning, afternoon and evening. Xow 
that the men are tied down by their 
studies, however, they are getting a 
long altera— a practice every day and 
an occasional dope talk in the evening. 
Thi team is light Ibis year in com- 
parison to many ol its rivals wbirh it is 
scheduled to meet. The candidates are, 
however, being thoroughly instructed 
in the theory ol the game as well as in 
the practice and it is hoped that they 
will make as creditable a showing as 
their heavier opponents. 



KAIM'A *. \MM A 



•HI 



George A Belmore 
Albert C. Smith 
Warren T.l.unville 
Winsor B. Wade 
Howard Hopkinson 

TIIKTA III! 

Ralph <>. Qottld 
Robert W Burrell 
Anon Crornack 
Harold H. Dimock 
George N. Perry 
Theodore J. Grant 
Elliot P. Dodge 
Stewart II. Anthony 
Cerald Thompson 
William T. Stopford 
Continued on page 2 



FINE SPEAKING FEATURES 

AT FIRST MASS MEETING 

The mass meeting held last Saturday 
night was one of the most successful 
from every stand-point the college has 
had for many years. The parade, which 
started al 140 in the evening from the 
Drill Hall, was headed by Cheerleader 
■Connie" Wirtb with two of his assis- 
tants. Xexl in older came a "motley" 
crowd of musicians from the Frosh 
class who furnished tl music. The 
route was down Pleasant street to the 
Davenport and back to the Drill Hall. 
At the return to the bonlire, which had 
previously been built by the Frosh, 
nearly all the College had joined and 
a large semi-circle was formed about 

the fire. 

The speaking of the evening was ex- 
cellent and the enthusiasm which was 
manifest throughout was good to see. 
"Kid" Go«e was the lirst speaker on 
the program, and he took as his main 
theme the slogan which he has given 
lo the Varsity squad, "We Work and 
Win" represented by W. W. W. It 
certainly "took" with the crowd. 

Other speakers to follow "Kid" were 
"Billy" Hasbrouck. "Doc" Lindsey, 
"Dolly" Dole, John Mctiinnis, Captain 
•Dame" Grayson, Roger Friend, 1'rexy 
Btttt erfield, and Captain Brady of the 
R. O. T. C. The meeting came to a 
close with the singing of the College 
song. 



2i. — "Rog" Acheson is located in a 
market garden establishment in Ar- 
lington, Mass. 



' i inil 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 4, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 4, 1W2. 



M. A. C. FIRST IN DAIRY AND 
STOCKJUDGINGATSPRINGFIELD 



Brewer and Heath '23 ol Dairy Team 
Place First and Third. 



On September l«t h teamij representing 
Cornell, Connecticut, New Hampshire 
and MiissiichuHettH competed in a dairy 
products judging contest held iu con- 
nection with the Eastern States Exposi- 
tion. This was the first contest of its 
kind ever held at the exposition. The 
products judged were five samples each 
of butter, cheese, milk, and vanilla ice 
Dream. So fftl as is known this is the 
tirst contest to include ice cream as one 
of the products to be judged. 

Tlie standing of the team follows: 
First— Massachusetts M04J6 points 

Second— Cornell 5238.74 

Third Connecticut MMJt " 

Fourth— New Hampshire 5184.45 

As can be seen by the results the con- 
test was exceedingly interesting and 
close. Massachusetts stood highest in 
butter and cheese. Cornell, market milk 
and New Hampshire, ice cream. (1. II. 
Brewer of Massachusetts had highest 
combined score for all products, H. E. 
Smith of Cornell second, and Allan 
Heath of Massachusetts third. 

Twenty-eight eastern concerns inter- 
ested in dairy products donated $547.10" 
for a beautiful perpetual trophy to he 
held for one year hy the institution hav- 
ing the winning team. In addition to 
this the Eastern States Exposition of- 
fered a banner to the team scoring high* 
est iu each separate product and a 
medal to the individual scoiinu highest 
in each product and liberal cash prizes 
starting with j>40 for lirst and endiuu 
with $10 for 15th to individuals of teams 
having best combined score in fudging 
all products. 

The official judges were C. W. Fry- 
hofer of New York, butter and cheese. 
O. E. Williams and ft. S. Snibh ol the 
1'nited States Dairy Division icecream 
and milk respectively. 

It is expected next year that practi- 
cally every agricultural college in the 
eastern states will enter a team. These 
contests can do much in pointing out 
defects in dairy products and helping 
to improve the quality of same through 
the coaching the men get in preparing 
them for this contest and in working 
with the official judges at the time of 
the contest. There is no more interest- 
ing work than coaching a dairy products 
judging group. To the average student 
butter is butter until he is shown a 
good and poor sample to begin with. 
After that it is most interesting to watch 
his improvement in judgment. 

The Dairy Cattle Team of the college, 
consisting of Mudgetl, Heath, and 
Brewer. '23, also walked away with 
first honors at the Springfield Expo- 
sition, thus winning another $500 
trophy to be kept at the college until 
next year. The team was high scorer 
in Guernsey judging, while Mudgett 
was high on Holsteins and third on 
Jerseys. In individual point-getting, 
Mudgett stood third. Brewer seventh, 
and Heath thirteenth. 

The standing of the teams was as 
follows: 

M. A. C. 4214 

Cornell 4204 

New Jersey j { 41Q7 
Conn. | 

, Delaware 4038 

New Hampshire State 4034 

Maine 3979 

Maryland 3931 

Penn State 3784 

Rhode Island 3684 



The Fat Stock team was less fortunate 
than their rival teams, taking but tilth 
place with six colleges oonpetibg. The 
ranking was: l'enn. State, Cornell, 
Mac Douald, Connecticut, Massachusetts. 

and New Hampshire. The individual 
members placed as follows: 

Alger 17 

Abele 19 

Co rash 23 

Bates 20 

Tow ne 28 



FRESHMAN PLEDGES 

Continued from page 1 



HHIMA IMII KI'HII.ON 

Frederick Coodwin 
Harold Jensen 
Kussell Barnes 
Albert Mann 
Earle Bruorton 

ALPHA HH1MA I'lll 

Herbert Craysoii 
Allan Snyder 
Thomas Ashe 
Stanley Burt 
Roger A. Lord 
Earle Brougham 
Chester W. Nichols 
William Collier 
Kay Smiley 
John Moiiarty 
Ceorge Berry 
Eeopoldo Aguilera 
William Budge 
Donald Williams 
Marvin Coodwin 
Heyworth Backus 
E. Thomas Murphy 
llatton Eangshaw, Jr. 
Herbert Moberg 

AI.l'll ■ I.WIMA WHO 

Herbert Bartlett 
Wendell Cooke 
Earle Douglass 
l'hillip Dow 
Richard Fessemien 
William Foul 
Ralph Hart 
Stanley Howes 
Edward McClenon, Jr. 
Frederick Tray 
William Easterbrook 
Elsworlh Wheeler 

KAl'I'A H1HMA 

Harry Eraser 
Kenneth Tripp 
Walter Stowell 
Charles McNamara 
Alvin Stevens 
G. Harold Thurlow 
Arthur Buckley 
Lewis (Javin 

KAfl'A EPNII.ON 

James Batal '25 
Alan Flynn 
Elmer E. Barber 
James Bowers 
Herbert Eindskog 
Edward Sullivan 

q. T. v. 

1920 

Clifford Avery 
Robert Buckhout 
Lawrence Clarke 
Russell Clarke 
Philip Conhig 
Preston Davenport 
Sidney Parsons 
John Temple 
Cliftou Waite 
Montague White 
Hugh Griswold 
Horace Warssam 
James Williams 
1925 

Francis Bean 
Xavier Peltier 



STETSON SHOES 

In Shoes as well as men, 
character counts. It is the 
inbuilt character or Stetson 
Shoes which makes them the 
favorite shoe with the well 
dressed College Man. 

The l>rit't' ol M St«taOHS. like 
all nuTcliandise in our atOM.ll 
always consistent witli quality. 

E. M. BOLLES 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

MALUM IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



WELCOME 

\\V have seen most of you fellows already, but to those who have not 
looked in on us, we extend a cordial invitation to do so. Our Pall 
stocks of clothing and haberdashery are the best we have ever shown 
and the prices merit your attention. Among the merchandise that 
we carry are the following well known lines: — 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes, Mallory Hats, 
Arrow, Parker and Tyson Shirts, Interwoven Sox, 
Oakes Bros. Sweaters, Lanpher Sheep-lined Coats. 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for Thirty-five Years. 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 

With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



*ge'«* 



hoe Store 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

" JUST TO REMIND YOU WHERE TO OBTAIN SUPPLIES 

— of — 

Prophylactic, Rubber Set, and other makes of Tooth Brushes. 
Kolynos, Pebecco, Pepsodent, Colgates, Listerine, and other 

popular makes of Tooth Pastes. 
Safety Razor Blades, Gillette, Gem, Durham Duplex, 

Eveready, and Autostrop. 
Cold Creams, Toilet Waters, Talcum Powders, Soaps. 
Electric Vibrators for Massage. 
Batteries and Lamps for your Flashlights. 
Sterno Stoves and Sterno Canned Heat. 
Thermos Bottles and Fillers. 

Thermos Lunch Kits, U pint bottles for $2.51 

Page & Shaw, Durand's, Cynthia Sweets, Huyler's Candies. 



A Complete Line oi College and Fraternity Banners, Pillow Tops and Table Runners. 

YE AGGIE! INN By the Campus Entrance 

Stationery Note Books Class-room Supplies 



TWO-YEAR FRESHMEN NUMBER 
THIRTY LESS THAN LAST YEAR 

The Two-Near enrollment thi* >e;n i> 
glV«S OSl •>> Ihc Short-Course oilier is 
tblrtjf less than that ol the enteliny 
.•lass last yeaa. There are one. hundred 
and thirty male si udents and se\ | n DO- 
i-dsinthe Kreshman class. This year's 
Senioi elass is composed ol one hundicd 
and nineleeti students. Although the 
entering class this year is not as large as 
last it is apparent that the depart no- m 
..I the college is last heeomiii" ■ popular 
uric. 



MR. WILLIAM H. RANNEY 

in van Vii.i.a..i.,N. II. ..sept. i'.». MB. 

Mr. William II. Kanney, who was a 

graduate of It. A. 0. la 1881 and who 

died in August of this year, was M oiit- 
slandinu character. For 14 years he 
was the ellicient manager of ihe II. 1'. 
Hood's interests here iu Kerry. He im- 
proved the large faun, making it much 
more productive than formerly, and es- 
laldished a large acreage of alfalfa, sup- 
erintended the putting up of a new up- 
to-date plant here in Deny. Daring the 
v cars of the war. when help was alBBOBl 
impossible to i>et , Mr. Kaunoy did the 
impossible and always kept the place 
runninu'so that the Derry milk supply 
never failed. Early ami late he uave 
his time and strentjth. His devoted 
wife was a wonderful help to him. Her 
health linally broke, and after a very 
trylBg sickness, she died learin^ Mr. 
Kanney with live children, I boy ami 
foal daughters. 

Dariag the war time, Mr. Uanney. 
with the consent of the firm with whom 
he was associated, assume*: many new 
duties. He was food administrator, 
fuel distributor, or rather head of 
these two departments for this locality. 
He was recognized by the state lot his 
splendid service. In all the drives for 
Liberty Loans and benevolences Mr. 
Kanney was always upon committees. 
He never failed to make good. No man 
was more sought than he when results 
were reeded. 

The same splendid spirit he showed 
in all civic life. He did not care for 
town oliice or stale olliee. He did serve 
sears upon Ihe local school board, and 
ihe affalri of the town, especially in 
town meeting. Mr. Kanney always 
look a forceful part. Time ami again 
he was sought for committee work, and 
always made good. He loved to work. 



He was a leader ol men. He gol results. 
He gave of himsell unsparingly. The 

town of Derry will miss bias greatly. 

Mr. Uanney was outspoken. He had 
his convictions and all knew where he 
Itood. He was always allied with the 
men who slood lor a clean viperous 
civic life. In all that he did for the 
public, 1 never knew him to receive 
any remuneration. He gave of his 
time and money Ilis auto was always 
at the service of any good cause. He 
was a good neighbor, a splendid worker 
in the church. For many years he was 
the .Superintendent of the Sunday 
School. lie was an active member of 
many social and civic clubs. 

PERL.KY L EtoBMB, A. M. 
Prin. Plakertoa Academy, 
Derry, X. B. 



THIRTY-FIVE CANDIDATES 

OUT FOR FROSH FOOTBALL 

There have been :i. r > candidates out 
for daily practice on I hi Freshman 
football team, which is being coached 
by "Hubha" Collins, who is now filling 
the vacancy in the posit i if Fresh- 
man Coach of Alhlelics. caused hy Ihe 
resignation of l.orin II. Hall at the end 
of June. Coach Collins has been teach- 
ing the hoys the fundamentals Of the 
game which they have grasped readily. 
Oe Monday the squad was given a long 
signal practice, and on Tuesday they 
weie given a half-hour scrimmage. I he 
lirst ol the season. 

The only serious accident of Ihe seas- 
on occured last week when Heed, while 
falling on Ihe ball, had the misfortune 
lo break his shoulder. His condition is 
not serious, but he will not get in the 
game again Ibis season. The lirsl game 
of the season has not been definitely 
decided upon yet . 



DEAN LEWIS SPEAKS FOR 
LAST TIME BEFORE ABSENCE 

Dean Lewis' farewell talk to the 
college last Sunday before leaving on a 
si\ month's leave of absence, will long 
be remembered as the best sermon 
heard for a long time. 

Preaching straight from the Uihle, 
which he afterward spoke of as the 
most complete and lines! help ami 
adviser aside from the true narrative of 
great lighters, he managed to give a 
• ode ol living both for students ami for 
college in three short texts. 

The lirst- do justice lo others and to 
yourself, was of course applicable both 
to thought and action. 

The second — be kind and considerate, 
is Samuel Hutler's definition of a gentle- 
man ami marks the finer phase of a 
man's life. 

The third— love (iod and your neigh- 
hoi , is Ihe essence of true Christianity 
as expounded by the Master Himself. 
Dean Lewis explained that while 
Faith was not mentioned here, every 
point implied it ami was based upon it. 
The favorite hymn of the Dean's " Faith 
of Our Fathers'' ended the Sunday 
chapel service. 



JOHN G. READ 

192-4 

has bought out the agency for 

Local Photographs 

formerly held by 

E. F. BLISS, JR. 

Pictures of everything on campus. 

"Get it from Johnny." 



Y. M. C. A. RECEPTION 

The annual V. M. C. A. leception lo 
the Freshman was held last Friday 
night in the Memorial Building. Prat 

Meat Batterfiold spoke briefly. Marsh 

man 9J told about the at hleiic activi- 
ties of I he college and Folsoin fj gave 
an account of the academic activities. 
Mr. Ilantia, the new I nleich inch Slu- 
detil secretary was presented, and he 
spoke briefly. Several college songs 

were sung, and ilo ifreehniente of 

cider and doughnuts were served. 
Following the reception dancing was 
enjoyed for a short lime. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 



Tel. 489-W 



P. I). HOMANS, 

Prop. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - - - Maea. 

S. S. HYDE 

Optlulftll mol JWW*»1«-I* 

9 1'leaaant Htreet (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replace! 

Mg hen A lariiiMoi-kii and other Reliable Makes 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 



;s. Drum*, •fc, Rmhmmdlng 



DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and Mate St»., Springfield. 



Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
For Sale or to Rent 

■avert Tailoring. Cl«»nlng and H<'i«irlng 
Dry (loaning, and Ityelng. l're»Htng b» 

TICKET SYSTEM 



LABROVI 

The Fashionable Taller 
Next to Weatern Union Tel. Office. 



Local Agent. 
B. A. fENN. 12 Woodiide Avenue. Amherst. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn RmpmMng WW/e U Wmlt 
NKW ritKKH 
Menu Whole HnleH. Hnt'liei MciIh . % 2- 5° 

Men's Half Hole*. Kulilict Heels . . SJ.75 
Men's Kunner Holes, Rubber Heels . O*'" 
Men's Half Holes SI.35 

Work fiuaranteed-AMHKKHT HOUHK 









WELCOME M. n. C 

FOR VERY NICE. 

Luncheon, Ice Cream 
Crushed Fruit Sodas 
Home Made Candies 
All Kinds of Smokes 



YOU CAN 



HAVE THEM HERE AT ANY TIME 



Special Supper Served 
Every Sunday Night at 



The College Candy Kitchen 



WHERE ALL THE 
COLLEGE MEN GO 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 4. 1*12. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 4, 1*22. 



WE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



iBvm.i W. Hi-ai.k 9J Editor-in-Chief 

l.i i HSU l«. ARRINOTon '28 Managing Editor 

Associatk Editors. 

John <;. K»ai-'24 Ab»1 Man's Editor 

Ai.HRiu K. Waioii^ Athletic Editor 

Solomon Coiikn "2H 

John M. Whittirk'28 

L. Francis Kk.nnkoy '2-* 
Ruth M. Wool. '24 

La* is 11. Kkitii *J 

( iiaui.kh F. Olive*. Ja. II 



explained its substance and significance. 
It applied to everyone in college and 
particularly freshman wbo have t inn 
college career to look forward to. Four 
years of work and pleasure which will 
be made a success or failure accordion 
to personal activities. The man who 
eegagea la athletics or academic activ- 
ities is looked up to as a man worth 
while. Are you going to sit hack and 
let the other fellow do if.' If you do, 
your lack of interest will be stamped 
against your name and your reputation 
as a "lounue lizard" will always trail 
in your footsteps. What are you going 
to do for your college? let's go! 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

Owrn E. Folsom '28 BualneM Mana««r 

Robert K. Stkf.re '24 Advsrtlalng Manager 

Ci.ikfori- I.. Ksi.i.kn '24 Circulation Manager 

Doeald w. UnmV 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusette Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at stconrl class matter at the Amherst 
Post Offlee. Accepted for mailing at ipectal 
rate of postage provided for In section 1 108. Act 
•f October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1818. 



A Word To Freshmen. 

The roi.i.K.cii an wishes to extend to 
the entering clasB a cordial welcome. 
You are welcomed to the opportunities 
that stretch invitingly before you, and 
should feel that sense of obligation 
which each new class experiences upon 
entering the gates of its chosen Alma 
Mater. Presumably you have care- 
fully scrutinized each college, weighed 
each vital consideration, made up your 
mind to pursue the course offered at 
this college, and therefore are willing 
to give it your best. It is possible that 
your original intentions may become 
overshadowed with an increased know- 
ledge of the agricultural field, but so 
long as your purpose remains worthy 
there is no harm done-. 

The college stands as a guidepost, 
leading you this way, and perhaps In- 
tluencing you to go la a direction 
wholly opposite to your previous inten- 
tions. But at the same time you will 
inject your new blood into the pulsing 
arteries of the institution, conveying 
that influence which is either good or 
bad according to your attitude. As a 
college is only what its students make 
it not for one moment should you lose 
sight of this pertinent truism. Now 
you are a part of the college and each 
year your intlunce will be felt more and 

more. 

At tirst the older customs and tradi- 
tions must be firmly impressed. 
What now seems a hard lot, will later 
be viewed wilh a cherished reverence, 
and ever will be the subject of the 
warmest remeniscence and the spiciest 
conversation. The rope pall, the night- 
shirt parade, the boxing and wrestling 
bouts, the Senate rules, pond parties, 
and all the other events make your en- 
trance into college a live one. This 
seemingly endless array of initiation 
ceremonies is calculated primarily to 
foster class spirit which comes wilh the 
intimate acquaintances formed in the 
struggles of the Frosh -Sophomore re- 
lations. Class spirit is known to lead 
to college spirit and college spirit is the 
life of the college. 

l'rcxy has presented the watchword i 
ol the year •'The Forward Look'* and 



The Four Day Struggle. 
Never before has a rushing season 
been so intense and of so short duration 
as this year. With each fraternity 
lighting to perpetuate itself by means 
of the best possible group of freshman, 
the struggle was one memorable to all. 
But could a fraternity discover the best 
possible group in the short time".' Ob- 
viously it could not. Was each fresh- 
man given the opportunity that should 
have been his to visit each of the fra- 
ternities which would have liked to 
make his acquaintance t Again no. In 
other words it was a wild game of 
chaiic.- far most fraternities and fresh- 
men. Four days as the only altcrna- 
live allowed by the Faculty Committee 
on Student Life to a second term 
rushing season was eagerly snapped up 
by most fraternities because of consid- 
erations known only to themselves. 
Probably it was suspected that the 
proposition would not be accepted at 
all and that the second term would 
again be utilized. It was claimed that 
the freshmen suffered from the lack of 
companionship last year failed to grasp 
the proper spirit of the institution, and 
finally were handicapped by lack of 
advice in their Bludies as evinced by 
the large number leaving college at the 
end of the tiist term. Actually, how- 
ever, more freshmen flunked out the 
second and third terms than l.elore. 

The present Seniors have seen four 
different rushing reasons during their 
college life. As Freshmen they were 
rushed intermittently or continually 
during four weeks; as Sophomores they 
rushed two weeks; when Juniors tiny 
Hied the second term plan anil the last 
experiment is still fresh in our memory. 
There is an advantage to the four-day 
system, however, which is not hard to 
discover. The whole ordeal is through 
quickly, leaving the fall term fully open 
for work. One saving grace of the rule. 
Then there are others. The Freshman 
is urged to participate in college activ- 
ities at the outstart. The weaker fra- 
ternities are given a better opportunity 
to survive creditably in the snuggle for 
existence, and all fraternities tend 
toward a more equal level. Although 
these reasons may not be favorably 
received in many fraternities, they are 
obvious. With the exception of some 
suspected preseason rushing, congratu- 
lations are to be bestowed on the upper 
classmen for the fairness wilh which 
the past rushing season was carried on. 
The absence of mud-slinging was as 
conspicuous as it was welcome. In 
previous years the feeling often ran 
high after a rushing season due to the 
gross unfairness voiced by some in the 
mad effort to get new members. May 
this same spirit permeate all future 
undergraduates and deserve an equal 
commendation as is due this year. 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

The annual financial report of the 
Athletic Department from July 1, MM, 
to July 1, IMS, inclusive, shows a total 
deficit of H8M .86, an amount consider- 
ably smaller than was predicted by 
Prof. Curry Hicks during the spring 
term. At that time it will be remem- 
bered the athletic tax was increased to 
$5.00, a sum considered sufficient to 
cover the net loss, and aid in lessening 
the financial worry caused the Athletic 
Department by inadequate funds. It 
has been found impossible to put M. A. 
(J. athletics on a paying basis, tine to 
the disadvantageous location of the 
athletic Held, consequently the gate re- 
rceipts are nominally almost negligible. 
The summarized report follows: 
Summary of tinancial report, July 1, 
1921, to July 1, ltB. 

EXI'KMUTl'KI U 

(ieneral Funds, MgOJ.10 

Football, 19UM 

Baseball, :J4o7.72 

Basketball, 1911.80 

Hockey, li:.ti.4M 

Track, UMIM 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Thursday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6.45. 6.30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, K\e. 
6-45.8-30 



Saturday 

Mat. 3, Bv*. 
6-45. 8*30 

Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve 
6-45 8-30 



George Arliis sad Doris 
Kenyon in "The Ruling 
Passion," from tori Ixii 
ititucer'» Casaoaa Baturdaj 
Evening Post story. Tbs 
ureatcht character actor of 

tin* (la> ill B nilllcktlUJ FOBS 

dy-drama unlike anything he 

h;i> SI it dOBS <>n the screen. 

Newt Comedy 

Irene Cattle and Ward 
Crane In "French Heels,'' 
from Clarence B. Kslsaad'i 

story. A modern ttory of 
New York ""id the In inlici 

i-;iini« of the North. 
Sport Review. "Self De- 
fense." Clyde Cook in 
"The Chauffeur." 

/.unetirey's powerful Story, 
"The Mysterious Rider,'' 
with Claire Adams and Rob- 
ert McKim. ZansOroi never 

wrote a Itor) thai \ ed at a 

faster pace than this. 
Newt 
-■reel Sunthine Comedy 

Tom Mix and Eva Novak 
in "Us and Going." This 
dashing daredevil »tar in a 
wonderful Northwest drama. 

Screen Snapshots 

.'reel Century Comedy 



Eevrything All "Write" Here 



Total, |B10li.81 

Becsifte 

(ieneral Funds. $11M2M.4m 

Football. 4188.16 

Baseball, 1880.88 

Basketball, 188J8 

Uockc> . 886.68 

Track, 188.88 

Total. $18*86.86 

Net (Iain 

(Ieneral Funds. 1708688 

\ it Loss 

Football, 18891.61 

Baseball, 1686.88 

Basketball, 1174 70 

Hockey, 770.90 

Track, 1275.72 

Total, *8009.74 

Lomm. 18888.78 <■»>«. 8TO86J8 

Net Loss, 61684.81 
I have this day, July 10, 1922, exam- 
ined this statement and all hooks from 
which this statement was compiled and 
find same correct. 

F. A. McIiAtoin.iN, Auditor. 




uo matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the oilice, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Paper, Envelopes, Bads, Blotters, Bens, 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc. 
Every article is warranted, and our 
prices are as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be clad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 



13.— Prof, and Mrs. Clark L. Thayer 
announce the birth of a daughter, 
Esther Vironue, on June 20. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

In his address to the students at as- 
scmbly last Wednesday. President 
Butterlield gave as the watchword for 
the oomlag college year "The Forward 
Look." 

He said that the eyes of the state are 
upon ns. and the (|tiestion is whether 
this college is worthy of an annual 
appropriation of nearly a milliou dol- 
lars. Not only have we need of a mil- 
lion dollar budget eaeb year, but we 
need buildings more than ever. The 
students must influence public opinion 
throughout the stale in our favor if the 
college is to be maintained and en- 
larged. 

The President called attention to the 
fact that there have been relatively few 
shanges in statl during the past year. 
He said that, acting upon recommen- 
dation of the Alumni committee which 
investigated the course of study last 
year, a new system of credits is to be 
tried out on the Freshmen. This sys- 
tem will give credits on the basis of the 
total time spent in and out of class up- 
on a given subject. 

"M. A. C. is beginning her fifty-fifth 
year, said the President, "Let us start 
a kick-off, not a foozle.'' 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

How to get acquainted— 
Attend a club night dance. 

Every other Wednesday, starting Oct. 25th 

Enjoyable evenlntr spent with con- 
genial you nit people guaranteed. 

Every FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Beginning Sept. 29th. 

Popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



NOW OPEN 
FOR BUSINESS 



College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suite made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 
Ralncomtm 

Suits Pressed 50c Military Tailoring 



KNOX HATS 
PARKER SHI IMS 
BURBERRY OVERCOATS 



rhOltlrl^ F ID/lKh H1CKBY-FRBBMAN CLOTHES 
Wl/vmua? !♦ I//UI*?./ ADLBR.ROCHESTBR CLOTHES 

COllCS* Outfitter IMPORTED HABERDASHERY 

More than a Todgery-A College Iiistifufinii 



FINE BOXING AND WRESTLING 
BOUTS FINALLY WON BY SOPHS 

Willi i in- Bopbomorei winning ibe 
boxing ami wreatUae. matches by ■ 
leant one point, ibe Brsl Interolasa con- 
test was closed last Wednesday ufgbt. 
Tin- first wrestling boot was staged by 
Coublg L'li.dni Gordon '80 wit fa Oonbig 
os top at ibe end due to superior tech- 
nique and ■peed, Mains 'Jii won the 
tirst boxing match in tbe lasi two 
rounds by sticking to it and outpoint- 
ing Samuels 'gfj w ho had him beaten in 
the first round. btarx '85 got ibe lirsi 
two falls smoothly from Baker "J»i and 
■bowed exceptional skill in overcoming 
Baker's superior weight. Sollivaa '86 
sad Agallera 'Sfl staged tin- liveliest 
aed games! Bgbt of the eventng, <io- 
ing two extra ronods to decide, Sulll- 
van not a decision. 

stouradiaa s> by dim of extra 
weight played Tburlow '90 for a doable 
fall ami gained another point foi lbs 
Sopha. tferranti '_'.". won from Roger* 



'24 easily la the Brsl round in tbe next 
boxing match, tlleaeou j."> was de- 
feated by Murphy ':!•» in tbe third 
round, after taking a spill through the 
ropea ami Into the brook from one of 
Murphy's haul smasbea, 

The wrestling falls ware rati off he 
tweea boxing, and ran over to the last. 
An excellent spirit ami Bus work on 
tbe part of the participants was notice* 
able. 



PADDLES AND WORDS HELP 
SUBDUE THE DAZED FROSH. 



Sophs Bravely Tear Off Nightshirts 
and Win Scrap 82-80. 

Beora oa their beade, nightshirts on 
their backs, and paddles applied where 
tbeywoald do tbe moal good narked 
Ibe Nightshirt Parade lasi Friday eight. 

\ daxed and uncertain Froebaeai 
Class faced the bowling mob dancing 
aronnd tbeas with aa much courage as 



they oould muater, ami the old Drill 
Hall swayed under tbe Mows of mighty 
paddles banged to produce aa Introduc- 
tion to a "line" delivered i>> some of 
(In- justly noted Sophomore orators ol 
debating ami olasa fame. Batal sad 
Duffy and MoGeooh for the oppreeaors 
endeavored to produce paralysis and tbe 
fear of death la the white-clad young* 
■ten. ii must !>«• admitted thai ibej 
had words ami in fad whole paragraphs 
thai beat aay thing beard here since 
i'utaam was a pup, ami it is believed 
that Uicy did auoceed in letting tbe frosh 
understand the general ueeleesnets ol 
Hie class of .egg. 
Paddles lifted the tirst man out ol lbs 

door on his way with winged heels and 
llu- long Hm- ran a gauntlet ol oak and 

haul pine ih tt warmed them into heated 
aotioa a few minutes later. Parading 
to the diaiag ball ami thence to the 
till 1 nt battle just north ol tbe football 
Beld, they formed their ring, encircled 
by the Sophs, ami seder tin- glare of 
ifae searchlights the mix-up was oa. 



Shirts were ripped or. in quantity, tbe 
Sophs si in Inn to count most of tbeir 
points in tin> manner, Seven men were 
fit i into t ho pas by tbe Sophs, ami 
seventeen bj tbe Procb. flood scraps 
were rolling arond under ibe ligbt, ami 

tbe lie Id was dotted with pieces Ol s hi lis. 

A i tbe oloee of tbe tight, upon count of 
the Senate, tbe Sopba were declared ibe 
winners i>> a scon- of >-' to So, 



FRESHMAN OFFICERS 
At tbefirel Freshman class meeting 

held last vYedneedaj alien i a) Grin 

neii Arena the class was organised and 
the officers i<>r the first term were 
elected. The entering class chose as 
tbeir president, James Bower, Jr. who 

is tieun llolyoke. For secretary. U.K. 

\\ei\ ot Montgomery was elected. Tbe 
other officers wen- vlee-presideat, Ber- 
ber! Grayson of Milford; treasurer, 
Barry Olough of Aahburabam; rap- 
lain, Edward T. Murphy of Byannla; 
aergeaut-at-arms, Robert Burrall of 

Abington; and historian, Williams. 




OVKH ADAMS* DRUG STORE 



QB9K 



Announcing our New Display of 

FALL SUITS 

Noah's messenger was a dove— to-day we use your own college paper in place of a winged 
messenger- -to extend a Welcome to all Aggie Men and'to let you know that we have a whole new 
Line of Norfolks. 

Kuppenheimer 

GOOD CLOTHES 





STETSON HATS 



correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

AMHERST HOUSE BLOCK 

NETTLETON SHOES HOLEPROOF HOSIERY 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS 



REISER CRAVATS 



■ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday ^October^mZ. 



Tlie^iissj^husettg^pJLegian. Wednesday, Ortoh^r 4 t 1<>22. 



± 




fjk' : ' I 



» " 








Tl-JM' 



"i.: 









Tin: BEST in 
Drug^ Store Merchandise 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

'llif Basal! store 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for taelf. 

Dmry's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for iill occasions. 



THE NEW CHEMICAL LABORATORY 



FAMOUS LANDMARK BURNS 

Continued from page 1 



by Ihe time it h*t »*•■ dlaaOTared (he 
entire lirst ftoot «U M densely liU.-.I 
with smoke that OMtloB was ihm ■<•*- 
Hary ...» the pari of the firemen, aad 
mat dlBkjoltj waa aacoMBtarad In Ind- 
ia. tb« somve of the eoaftacratioa. 

UUTexanuiiatioi.reveHle.llliei.n.l.al.le 

„,•„,„,, Md tnoogb the tuel aaaae to 

,1111 ,,„esti..n !( l.le the stale laapaetoJ 
MMPtnd tb« theory of nit lie Held US 
woo-laslheeauseof the B». 

The lire followed the partition 
between tho laboratory and the Mute 
,,,„,„ and then :iteilH way int.. the flool 
between the first and seeond story. 

The chemistry stall was I and and 

thounh it was found i.ni-ossil.le to |0 
up the stairway, ladders were iaise.1 
and accessessuained through the win- 
,, oWH ,othe library, from which place 
the men commenced their tireless work 
of rescue. The entire library of books 
was saved and in addition, some mate 
rials from the depart metit's and Dr. 
Veters- olliee. Kntraiice to I he cellar at 
the west endof the builditiK was next 
made, and the place beiim free from 
smoke and fire, it was found possible to 
Have mQQ worth of apparatus of this 
year's order which had been unopened. 
In addition to this property, a small 
amount of miscellaneous material was 
also removed from the basement stoic 
room. 



Kllorts were somewhat confined to the 
east end of the building, on which sec- 
tion all the water was dirieted. In 
spite of everything, however, the fire 
gradually worked to the top 01 the old 

building and a half hour after the dis- 
covery, llames burst out on the roof and 
quickly spread over and enveloped the 
entire upper portion From the top it 
worked dowh and destroyed the BBtlta 
west BBd ol the building -leal to the 
mound, During the holiest pari of the 
OOaflagntioa a pronounced explosion 

oecnred, due to taak of either oxyaa ox 
bydrogBB eaa baeoaalBg heated, and 

several times laid, smaller pops, due 
lo the explosion of sodium, occurred. 
All quantities el ether, benzine, and 
such inflammable material . along with 
all the alcohol, were inside the lire shed 
just outside the building and these were 
removed and saved. 

After the lire was out, part of the 
second st.uy Bon* was still intact at 
the east end, and almost the entire lirst 
Boor. This roaatBlBf upper structure 
was not demolished until after exami- 
nation by the lire inspector. The ap- 
paratus store room in the l.asement, 
protected as it was by tha floor above, 
was not entirely demolished, and BO 
from the organic laboratory and the 
l.asement storeroom a laigB amount of 
ordinary apparatus was discovered and 
talTBged alter the the. The depart- 
ment safe fell tbroagfl (he floot and w;is 

found after the Bra on Saturday, lying 



face down. The combination worked 
perfectly, all the platinum was intact, 
and the papers in the safe were not 
even scorched. Ihe entire properly loss 
was serious. The value of the equip- 
ment was |18,000, and *r,(HHl worth of 
apparatus was Ml raged. 

The work of the department is now 
b.-inu carried on in ol her buildings ol 
the campus, the Freshman laboratory 

being conducted in Stoekbridga, the 

Sophomore laboratory and Fresliman- 
Sophomoie lectures in Flint and the 
.Junior-Senior classes in the Microbiol- 
ogy building. Shipments of a|q>aratus 
and chemicals have already been re- 
ceived, and all courses were being «iven 
as usual OB Monday. 



WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 



WORLD SERIES ON CAMPUS 

Two teams, captained respectively by 
"Nom" IUlyard and "Doe" Gordon 
will play the Worlds Series of live 
geceet this fall, with all varsity baseball 
men not out for football play lag. The 
lirst game la Wednesday, and the names 
will be played each Tuesday and Wed- 
nesday until the quota is completed, 
(iordon's Yanks have in their line-up 
Kane, Holly. Nicoll, Temple, (.illord. 
Johnson and QordOB, while lor llil- 
yard's Ciants Simmons, Uriinnci, 
barker, fahill. Hiehards and Harring- 
ton will be in form. 

More men are Beaded la complete the 
squad, and the games should offer a 
good mid-week interest on the campus. 



The Store of Quality and Service 

invites your attention 
to out line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We cany 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 

— IN — 

Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 




19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9 J 



After Every 
Meal 




The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Memorial Building" 




TRANSFERS 



The following have entered college 
this fall as transfers from other col- 

legee:— 

A. F. Ilrowiiell, Williams lPJf] 
?. E, Baker, M I. T. 1088 

V. I. bean. I 'ni\ersil\ ol Maine MKM 

K. Blllinger, Dartn th 19i4 

S. S. Fairbanks, Amber*! l'.cjti 
s. !•'. Qordoa, V II. Mate loja 

C. A. Harris, Syracuse 19SS 

I,. L. .liiiiii's. M. I. T. in.M 

.IS. Lacev. t larkson lust, of Tech. 1936 

U. w. Potter, C. v. < . IQM 

K. I). Sawyei. (lark I9M 
II. A. Wright. Miami 19SB 



Hkukkui L "Hi i;i: a" ( mi. ins 
Coach ol Freshman Teams, IMS-19H 



NOTE 

The summer issue of World Agricul' 
turf. Containing valuable informal ion 
regarding "Denmark", was mailed in 
August to the home address of each 
subscribing juenther of ihe World Ag- 
riculture Society. If any M. A. ('. 

members felled to receive tbia oopj an- 

ol her will be supplied B| application 

lo the (ieneral Secretary. Prof. I,. II. 
Parker, Off lo Gay A. Tlielin, Secretary 
of the Ainheist Brauob. 



NOTE 

The Kaatara Division of (lie American 
Dairy Science Association was organised 

on Sept. 2(1 at a mectine, held in con- 
nectioli with I he Kastcrn Stales Kvpo 
sition at Sprinnliehl. I!. W. Smith of 
the Dairy department was elected sec 
retary. 



the: 



Northampton, Mass. 



The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing mnd Printing 

Mills Studio-Phone 456-R 



— TRY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for first-class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., AmherHt. Mass. 

GRANGE STORE! 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a paii 



— on- 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

'■'Reasonable in dollars and sense."" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass 



PASSING OF THE OLD CHEMICAL LABORATORY 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 hy mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



BUY YOUR 

SHOES and HOSIERY 



From our store if 



WANT TO SAVE MONEY 

w e guarantee you good shoes at lower prices. 

SHOE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

Four skilled shoe makers lined up and 
ready to repair your shoes while you 
wait, on the basis that you must be 
satisfied. Tiy it, you will like our service. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

ON VOIR WAY TO THE POST OFFICE 

DAMERST a F0T0S, Prop. 




M. A. C. Students who are 
not acquainted with 

THOMPSON'S 
SHOP 

should make us a call at your 
earliest opportunity. 

We can supply you college men with most of your 
needs such as Golf and other Sporting Goods of all 
descriptions. Typewriters and Bicycles for sale or 
for rent. 

Our Grafonola Room is a comfortable place to 
select the latest COLUMBIA Records. 
Thompson '8 Repair Shop, with two first class me- 
chanics is fully equipped for all kinds of repair 
work. It will pay you to make us a visit. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR NATIONAL BANK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 4, 1922. 




COLLEGE AND 




The two are inseparable, bat we can supply the latter. When it comes to the correct 
outfitting of college men, we have a most enviable reputation-one built up by handhng 
only the best at right prices. Make it a point to drop in whenever you need anythmg. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 

Exclusive Agents Dobbs Hats. CM '* e Outfitters. 



THE ENTERING CLASS 

Continued from page 1 



Bart, Mauley I*. 
Carlson, Oscar K. 
Cassidy, Marion S. 

< llarke, Lawrence ■ .. 

Clarke, BUBSell .1. 
CHoagb, Many K. 
Collier, William W. 

c.ok, Wendell B. 
Cooke, Helen B, 
Cornier, Frauds J. 
Coubig, Pbllip'B. 

Cnuiiack, Aaron v. 
< in ler, Samuel 

I Htveeport , Preeton .1 

Davis, lively 11 Ij. 
Hick, Finest A . 
Dlmoek, Harold E. 
Dodge, Bitot P. 
Donogbne, < '. Eileen 
Doollttle, Alden II. 
[touglaesi Baric L. 
Dow, Pbtiip N. 
lfiicharme. I.ucicn 11. 

Bldredge, si nail 
Fstahrook. William 
Fairbanks, Bumner C. 
Parley, Elisabeth 
Peacenden, Rlebard W. 
Pltagerald, Lillian a 

Plj 1111. A Ian P. 
Ford, William W. 

Praaer, Carl a. 
Praeer, Harry K. 

Fuller, George L. 
Qaaklll, Peter C. 
Gavin, I. inns A . 
Goodwia. Predertek T. 
Goodwin, Marvin W. 
1 Jordon, Samuel F. 

< torso, Lottta 
Goald, Ralph <>. 
< (rant, Theodore J. 
Qrayeon, Herbert 
Greenwood, Elliott K. 
Qriswold. II uuh T. 
Guild, Everett .1, 
C.unville Warren T 
(iuslafson, Alton 

Harris, Stephen F. 

Hart, Ralph N. 

Hateh, Harold C. 

Haynes. Walter I,. 



F.astliainpton 
Ainlieisl 

Baal Boaton 

Sloneham 
Stoneliam 
Ashhurnhani j 

Bopedele 
Tow nee nd 
Blchmond 

Ntwloiiville 

Beverly 

Shellmrne Falls 
Bpringfleld 

Nhelblirne Falls 

Bpringfleld 
Lawrence 

Oxford 

Beverly 
Hoi yoke 

N'orthliel.l 

Bpringfleld 
Bolton 

llolyoke 

Wineliester 

Britnneld 
Norwood 

Amherst 
Ifiddleboro 

llolyoke 

Newt mi 

Dal ton 

Weslboro 

Jajaatea Plain 

llavdenville 

Worcester 

N'ati -k 

Wcstlield 

Reading 
1 pawieh 

Chelsea 

Topsfleld 

AiiUurmlale 
Mi Hold 

Bebbnrdeton 

Grlswoldvlllt 

Melrose Highland! 

North Weymouth 

Brockton 

Brookllne 

Dorchester 
Melrose 

Bpringfleld 

Amherst 

Manchester 

Kail haven 



l.ane, Ariliur A. North Hrooktield 

Langenhaeher, Robert P. 

New Kochelle, N. Y. 



Laogthaw, Hattoa, Jr. 

I, cedes, Joseph 

Lindekog, Herbert A. 

Lord. Roger 

Mac Kay. Alfred S. 
MacMasters, Majel M. 



Fairhaven 

Worcester 

Roxbary 

Mcthuen 

So. Daorfleld 
Aabburnham 



Walsh. Philip B. 

Warden, Raymond A. 

Warren, Francis W. 
Wheeler, Blleworth II 



Amherst 

Natick 
Stow 

Bolton 



White, Montague W. Hartford, Conn. 

Whithed, Francis M. ISeinardstoii 

Williams. Donald 11. Noithtield 



Williams. Janus K. Glastonbury ,Conn. 
Waraaam, Horace 11. Raroardaton 

Zuin, A.s. New Fork CItj 



• os .— Frank Bdwaidi In Buperlntend 

,. n t of Wat kins School at Hartford, 

Conn. 



So 



Heald, Theodore B. 
Hemieliery. Thomas V 
llolhrook. Lester M. 

Holling worth, Dnncalf W. 

Providence, II. I 
Hopkinaon, Howard 
Horner, David J. 
Howee, Stanley K. 

Huke. Barbara 

Hulchins. Maurice C. 
Hyde. Alvin M. 
Jack , Ronald A . 
Jameson, Matthew 

Jenaen, Harold .s. 
Johnson. Philip G. 
.(ones. Alvah W. 
Jones. Lawrence L. 
Kafalian, S. 

Kelso, George 

Lam he it . John F. 



llolyoke 

Montpelier. Ohio 

Bri in field 
Radley Falls 

Auburndale 
E. HrinilieUl 

A mberst 
Everett 

Weatfleld 

Amherst 

Salisbury 

P.rockton 

Armenia 

Reading 

Cleasondale 



Mann, A. I. 

HeCabe, idith hf. 
KeGleaen, Edward W., Jr. 

McNamara, Charles A. 
Miller, Paul 
Hoberg, Herbert K. 

Moran, John 
Moriarly, John 
Murphy. F.dward T. 
Need ha in, Basil A. 
Nichols Chester W. 
Nickerson, Flsie F. 
Ndrcioss. Roy K. 
Novick, Leo 
Noyes. Eliza M. 
Nylen, J. Herbert 

otto, Raymond H. 
Palmer, Cary D. 

Paraoaa, Sidney W. 

I'eckham, Carlisle II. 

Perry, George N. 
Pomeroy, Rllaabeth C 
Potter, Royal W. 
Pray. Frederick C. 
Palaam, Rath R. 

Peed. Charles P. 
Richards. James M. 

Blobardeon, Henry H 

Kivnay. F./.ekiel 
Kogcrs, Harold S. 

Bogera, John 

Uogers, Oscar P. 
Low en, F.dward J. 
Bargent, Carmeta K. 
Sawyer. Roland D ., Jr. 
Shea. Margaret C. 
Bbedd, Wendell Phillips 
Blmonda, Henry F. 
Smiley, R. T. 
Smith. Albert C. 
Smith, Margaret P. 
Smith, Raymond R. 
SniiTen. F. L. 
Snyder. Allan 
Bpooner, Raymond H. 
Staniford, D. M. 

Stevens, Alvin G. 

Btopford, William T. 

stoweil, Walter H. 

sturtevant. George B. 

Sullivan, Charles N. 

Sullivan. Donald C 

Sullivan. F.dward F. 

Bweetland, Augustus F 
Temple, John P». 
Thorn peon, Gerald F 
Thnrlow, George H. 

Tripp, Kenneth 15. 

Tucker, Rdwin L. 
Tulenko, John 
Turner. Charles F. 
Vaughan, Eliott 

Wade, Windsor P.. 
Wagnet, William R. 

Watte, < liftoa B, 



W. Dalton 

llolyoke 
Dorchester 
Btougbton 
Bpringfleld 

Campello 

Amherst 

Ware 

Hyaenia 

'Taunton 

Nalick 

F. Postoii 

Brtmfleld 

A in heist 

Greenfield 
E. Boaton 

Lawn-nee 

Grafton, vt. 

Conway 

Melrose Hide, 

Walt ham 

Longmeadow 

I'rovidence, R. I. 

Cambridge 

(Ireeiifield 

W. Bridgewater 

Bpringfleld 

Millis 

llolyoke 

La(iraimeville,N.Y. 

Cambridge 

Ludlow 

West Held 

Shrewsbury 

Ware 

llolyoke 

Arlington 

Winchester 

Worcester 

Bpringfleld 

'Taunton 

Manchester 

Weatport, Conn. 

llolyoke 

Bri m field 

Reading 

Needbam 

Newtonville 
Grafton, Vt. 

Ware 



Fall River 
Amherst 
Warren 
Sloneham 
Shellmrne Falls 
Shelburne Falls 
West Newbury 
Spencer 
Baldwinsville 
Sunderland 
Springfield 
Pelham 
Andover 
Sunderland 
Orange 



C&rptn-ter St Morehouse, 
PRINTEnS. 



No 1, Cook Plac*. 



Amherat, Maw 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 

T1TH $35.00 worth of 
y gptfd Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal mixture, 
well fed with good roughage, 
you can produce at current 
prices $135.00 worth of milk. 

- 

These feeds to be found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealers stock. 



CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO. 

N.W York Chicago 







MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



No. 2 



WORLD'S SERIES ON CAMPUS FIRST GL£E CLUB TRY0UTS 
BRINGS OUT GOOD MATERIAL SH0W EXCELLENT MATERIAL 



Thirty-two Men Include Seven from 

Freshman Class. Tryouts for 

Orchestra Tonight. 

The first rehearsal of I he year lor the 
Qlee Clab waa Bald lati nighl at eaves 

o'clock in the Memorial Building, 

Tryouts for the Qlee Club were held 
,., st on Tuesday eve-limn, Oet. I, under i he 
Wednesday afternoon, ... any predicted direction of Coach Harlan Worthley M 
that tbe big struggle in New York woald a, " i ' W. Wada, this yea. s leader. 
turn out the seme wey, but tines then *°» t,lil " M eaadldatai name out to 
we have learned differently. However. compete for tbe club and the large 



Gordon's Yankees Collect 1-0 Win 

from Hilyard's Giants in 

First Game. 

When the New York Yankees, under 
the leadership of Captain Cordon won 
the first game of the local World's 



as the little fracas at the big city does 
not hold a candle to ourown battle right 
here on the campus we are not concerned 
with it. 

The Qlaati, beaded by "Noma" Hil- 
yard, put up a terrific struns.de and it 
was only alter there was one out in the 
seventh Inning that they were overcome, 



BBmber necessitated further tryootl 
last Friday evening. At present, :\2 
men remain as the recall of the first 
big cut, ami this nuniher will have to 
he further reduced before starting on 

the tripe in December, An unusually 

large amount of good material is ready 
to work with, and judging by the good 



when the second Yank hatter hammered »»OWiOg last night the clul. is oil on a 

out a three bagger and was soon scored *°°* s,ar '- The material was especially 

ob a pretty tingle. This sodden ebange "'"" 1 «»'""« *»• ,i,sl and second bass 

of events brought the bard fought hat- I' ;il,s :i1 "' »■ addition a l.ar.tone soloist 

lie to an al.ri.pt end ami bagged the "•■ bee" foliml wl, ° will make a line 

game lor the Yanks, 1-0. addition to this year's program. 



I!rn. iner and .Johnson twirled superh 



The club baa a line list of songs which 



hall for the losers hut the steady pitch- 1 ' :iv '' heen carefully selected and re- 
leg of Holley for the Yanks proved too 
much for the opposing halters and the 



game was remarkahly free from two and 
three hase hits. 

The series, which will continue for 
two or three weeks, Ihe games being 
played each Tuesday and Wednesday, 



hearsals will he held every Tuesday 
and Friday evenings for the present. 
1 1 ail a 11 Worthley 10, who has heen the 
coach for the last two seasons, has re- 
lUmed his duties as coach and is now 
hard at work with the cluh. Arrange* 

incuts are already under way and eearlj 



eases outgrowth of tha Fall practice. •«■■*•»* »«* : » '"""'"■ , - , ' 1 f ««maillej»i 



This was the method hit upon to give 
new material as well as old a chance to 
-how what a summer with the home 
town aggregations has done for them. 
Tha first practice was well attended and 
a successful squad in the Spring is the 
present outlook. 



TRUCK LOAD GOES TO STORRS 

Twenty-two enthusiastic Co-eds jour- 
neyed in an overloaded truck to Btorre, 

iti Saturday, to see the football name. 
Mr. Witt of lielchertown was the truck 
driver. 



trips this season, and prospects of some 
good worth-while concerts look better 
than in a number of years. 

Tryouts for the orchestra will he held 
this evening at seven o'clock in the Me- 
morial Building. The following men 
have heen selected for the Clee Cluh: 

First Tenors- Alexander '2'.i, l.toder- 
lek '2:1, Nowcis '2:;. Sears 'ft, Diinoek 
'i!ii. Frost '24. Darling '24, Parsons 'SB, 
Wade 'M. 

Second Tenors - Fancuf '2:1, II. Vor- 

cross '2:1, Paddock u i.\, Btevenaon "21. 
Lambert 18, C. N. Terry ■_'<!, M. M. 
Smith. 

First Bamee— Arriagton '2:!. Blade 



The expedition waa arranged by Molly I «gg Loriag '24, \V. W. Wood '24. 



Lewis, and when, at the last moment, 
it was found that there was not room 
enough for all the girls, it was Miss 

Lewis who rode cm the running hoard. 
The Senior girls were there 100 percent. 
strong, and a majority of each of the 
•>t her classes was there. 

The truck started after breakfast on 
Saturday, and arrived hack by ten- 
thirty Saturday night. On the way 

ack the girls aot pretty wet, hut their I 
v pirits were by no means dampened. 
The unanimous opinion was "it was 
fib it". 

Four other girls made the trip by 1 
touring car. 

Mrs. Gore was chaperone of the truck 



NorWOOd '24, Cle.ives '2."». Corwill '2.'), 

Nichols '2(i. 

Continued on page 8 



DI€D 

on October 5, 1922 

DR. JJfll»€S B. PHIG€, 

D. V. S. 

D>. H. C 1882 

Professor of Veterinary Science at 
the College. 



VARSITY TAKES UPHILL FIGHT FROM 

CONN. AGGIE TO START OFF SEASON 



C. A. C.'s Hopes Dashed by 13-6 Score. Showing Made Against Much 
Heavier Team Looks Good for Coming Season. 



MISS HORTENSE NEILSON IN 
DRAMATIC RECITAL SATURDAY 



The Doll's House by Hendriek Ibsen 
Well Presented. 

The Bolster Doisteri presented last 

Saturday evening in llowkei A uditoi iuin 
Miss Monetise Neilson in tin- drainaiie 
recital Of "The Doll's House" hy Ken- 

drick [been. 

The piihlic was invited to attend the 
reading, hut bccance ttf the stoiiny 
weather, only 2tM) were pleseilt. 

The play is one of the most lamoils 
•Oiks Of the ureal Swedish playriu'ht. 
It was written when the woman's move 
meiil was in its inlaney. It deals with 

the Borrow and mltnnderet ending which 

tricot in married lift when the wife has 
no share in her h ushand's Inisiness. The 
heroine. Dora, was presented superMv 
K> Mts> Neilson. 



PICTURES OF NATIONAL 
FORESTS SHOWN AT ASSEMBLY 



Prof. Waugh Telia of Scenic Beauties 
of Forest Reservations 

At Assembly last Thursday, ProfCCtOl 

Waagh u'a^'- an entertaining address 

on "Our National Forests." He illus- 
trated it with many line lantern slides 

in natural colore. 

He ttretttd the importance ol the 
forest reservations in conservation of 
water and also in providing pleasure 

groonds for millions of the oltiaens of 

the United Slates. Kive million people 
\isitedthe torests last year, many of 
them camping out for extended vaca- 
tions. In the West there are a somber 
of permanent camps bnili by munici- 
palities for the use of their citizens. 
Professor Wnagn. said thai tht foresl 

tcMivalions in the Last are fully as 
beautiful as any in the West. He 
showed pictures of Batters forests, and 
then several scenes of the college forest 
on Mi Toby. He said that then- est 
many beautiful spots right around Am- 
herst which should he visited hy every 

college student, and bs urged more use 

of the college forest. 



NOTE 

The Two Year Freshmen were given 
I reception last Saturday night hy 
President and Mrs. Hiitterlield. Mr. 
and Mrs. I'helan, ami Misses Skinner 
and Hamlin were present. Refresh- 
ments of applet, cakes and ice cream 
were enjoyed hy the guests. 



< >n a wet Held, sgalnsl t team I hat 
outweighed them 90 pounds per man 

from end to end, the Massachusetts 

aggie grldstera palled the long end of 

1 18-0 SCOTS lent Batnrday at Connecti- 
cut Aggie, The ttulmeggers were ex- 
ceptionally anxious to win, as they 
tevei had defeated their Hay State 
rivals. When the Maroon team entered 
the locker rooms they found signs cov- 
ering the walls which read, "Heat 
Mass. Aggie" and similar optimistic 
phrases. I'.ut Kid Core's pupils w< i, 
more t han I match lor I hem. 

Mass. Aggie kicked off and immedi- 
ately took the ball away from ' ounce! 
lout. Inside <>f three minutes a pass 
from Heal to hfarshmau took it aerom 

the Nutmeg's go;,l line and a moment 
later .liiiiinie dropped across a drop- 
kick from (he l."> vai.l line loi the goal. 

For tn* remainder o! tha half the ball 

stayed in Connecticut territory, Massa- 
chusetts' goal never being threatened, 
Tunic y got away some pretty punts 

s/hiofa completely outdistanced those of 
his rivals. 

In the tCOOad half it looked almost as 
though weight might tell against agil- 
ity ami knowledge of the game. For 

several successive slays the Connecti- 
cut eleven haltered t hi: .Mainon line for 
gains of four or live yards. Hut the 

aggie ohesring section (which, by IN 

way, outnumbered that of the home 
team) staved with the players. Time 
alter time it looked as though the 

heavy hackiield of tht Connection! 
team could not he stopped by anything 

that Massachusetts bad on the lield. 
lint nowhere in the game were the 
stay in« tpialities and the thorough 
knowledge of football which the Hay 
Stale aggregation possessed more evi- 
dent than at this juncture. Finally, hy 
a mixture of rushes and penalties, tht 
home team managed to get the pigskin 

within lAyarda of M. A. C.'s goal. And 

tlien came the surprise of Hie game. 

The Connecticut quarterback called for 
a forward pass. Instead of going for- 
ward it went almost straight up and by 
some freak of fate it landed safely in 
tbe arms of a Connecticut player who 

was iu^-i erecting tht goal line. It was 
all ever In a minute and C. A.C. had 
made its lone score ot the game, miss- 
ing a place-kick for goal on the next 
formation. The ipiarler drew to aolott 
with the M. A. C. team rushing the ball 
towards tht Connecticut goal line. 
Early in tht last period Orayeon, In t 
wide end run, crossed tbe home team's 
goal for the last time. It was a fine 
(day and his interference worked like 
machinery. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



The results of this initial content 
against a heavier team which had al- 
ready played two games and whose one 
ambition seemed to he to trim Mass. 
Auirie brought to the campus a feeling 
of confidence. The students had been 
barred by secret practice from watch- 
ing the eleven in action but those who 
made the long trip to Storrs last Sat- 
urday and those who have heard about 
the game since feel that prospects for 
a successful season are very bright. 
The liue-up: 



Mass. Aooikh 
Marshman, le 
Pierce, le 
Salman, It 
Myrick, lg 
GImmb, lg 
Alger, c 
No we re, rg 
Mohor, rt 

Alicli'. rt 

Ferranti, re 
Ileal, qb 
Tumey, lhb 
(irayson, rhb 
Harrows, rhb 
Sargent, fb 



(Joan. Aooiks 

re, Uadavitch 

rt, Juralowicz 

rt, Sinneman 

rg, Ashman 

c, Patterson 

lg, Sphlivichert 

lg, McAllister 

It, K. Kddy 

le, M. Kddy 

qb, Colicii 

rhb. Kyan 

rhb, Snideman 

lhb, Hurley 

lhb, Donohue 

fb, Daly 



McGeoch, fb 

Touchdowns— Marshman, Grayson, 
Hurley. Point by goal from touch- 
down — Heal. Heferee — Halloran of 
Providence College. Umpire — Herry oi 
Spriuglield College, 
lock of Hoston Tech. 
periods. 

vScore by periods: 
1 
Mass. Aggie, 7 

Conn. Aggie, 



Linesman — Wood- 
Time — 15 minute 



2 





3 4 

tf-13 
6 0-6 



Sidelights. 
AgK»e co-eds showed their loyally by 
coming down to root for the team at 
Storrs. They went down in a Heo speed 
wagon, and although weary from their 
seventy-live mile jaunt, they were able 
to yell with true Aggie spirit for the 
team. 

* • * • • 

Co-eds were not the only group of 
Aggie undergraduates sitting on the 
bleachers, however. Some lifty of the 
sterner sex also were present when the 
leferee's whistle started the game. 

* * • • • 

"Cap" Grayson's team were agneeably 
surprised at the sight of the M. A. C. 
bleachers. They showed it by making 
their first touchdown mi less than three 
minutes of play in the first quarter. 

* • • • • 



Tbe touchdown, by the way, was a 
beauty. "JiirumLe" Beal at quarter 
tossed the pigskin neatly to "Willie" 
Miarshiuau. The latter leaped up in the 
air iu true basketball style, caught it 
ami fell down over the line with it for 
a six point tally. 

* • • • • 

"Jimmie" made it seven by drop- 
kicking the ball right over the crossbar 
between the goal-posts. 

* • * * * 

"Cap" made the other touchdown for 
Aggie later in the game, when he ran 
around tfee Nutmegs' left end with 
perfect interference, and wasn't stopped 
until the last white line was crossed. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION TO 
START WITH NEXT ISSUE 

A competition of Sophomores for pos- 
itions on the (Joi.i.koian Hoard opens 
with the next issue. Both the Editor- 
ial Stall' and the Business Department 
will elect new members. 

The competition will extend through 
the final issue of the term. The Fresh- 
man competition will not commence 
until the second term. Candidates for 
the Business Department may report to 
Owen E. Folsom '23 at the Phi Sigma 
Kappa House, and candidates^ for the 
editorial staff to John M. Whi'ttier "23, 
at the Kappa Sigma House. 

The rules are to be essentially the 
same as those used in 1021), as follows: 

For eligibility to election to tb« bus- 
iness staff, a mini mum of 16 credits 
will be required. These may be ob- 
tained by ollice work, routine work, or 
by obtaining advertising. One credit 
will be given for each two hour's work. 
It is stipulated in the rules that at least 
one credit shall be earned for the ob- 
lainance of advertising. One point will 
be given for each column inch of 
new advertising or each two column 
inches of renewed ad vcr'.isinjc. 

The editorial department requires a 
minimum of 20 credits. One credit will 
be given for reading one of several 
books used by the Uural Journalism 
department. A quiz based upon this 
reading will be given to the competitors 
at the end of the ten weeks. If the 
candidate shows a sufficient knowledge 
of the subject, he will be credited with 
one point. A maximum or live credits 
will be given for otliee work or proof 
reading at the rate of one point for 
each two hours. The majority of the 
credits must be earned by news articles 
turned in and actually used. The ma- 
terial for these must be obtained inde- 
pendent of the assignments made to the 
regular staff. Credit at the rate of one 
point for each six column inches of 
new material and for each seven inches 
of "rewrite" material. One general 
assignment will be made to the compet- 
itors each week. The best article of 
those turned in will be printed and the 
author thereof will receive the credit 
for it. 

Each competitor for the Editorial 
Staff must hand in published material 
pasted on paper to facilitate the total- 
ing of credits. Headlines count noth- 
ing. 

When a candidate obtains the mini- 
mum requirement in credits, it merely 
renders him eligible for election. The 
board reserves the right to withhold 
election. 

Elections will be held immediately 
following the last issue of the term. 



FREEH 
A Pair of 

Stetson Oxfords 

Imported Tan Scotch Grain 
or Black Norwegian Calf. 

To trie flayer, eitker M. A. C. or Amlierst, 
making the first touchdown in the M. A. C- 
Amherst game, SATURDAY, October 21. 



E. M. BOLLES 



The Comoy Pipe 



KAPPA EPSILON TAKES OVER 
FORMER THETA CHI HOUSE 



We have a large and direct importation oi Comoy 
Pif>es. The House of Comoy fcrobahly occupies the 
largest Briar pipe factory in the United Kingdom, and 
their pipes and other products are known for their 
quality in a land where good pipes are common. 

Our stock of the widely-known 
and appreciated Dunhill Pipes is 
the largest and most complete 
ever shown in Amherst. 

The Dunhill pipe needs no introduction to the large 
army of Dunhill smokers. Its cool, sweet smoke is too 
well known. 



Saturday the Kappa Epsilon Frater- 
nity spent the day moving into their 
new home, the house recently vacated 
by the Theta Chi Fraternity. The 
bouse has been completely renovated, 
both inside and out, and is in the best 
of condition. The Kappa Epsilon Fra- 
ternity, formerly known as the Com- 
mons Club, has in years past occupied 
the suite of rooms on the top floor of 
North College, but recently the mem- 
bership has become so large that the 
quarters could not adequately accom- 
modate them, so it was decided to take 
over the new home. 



We also have Meerschaum Pipes, 
Three B. Pipes in great variety, 
and all Smokers' Needs. 



Connecticut had a bad day of it all- 
around. Suffield Academy beat their 

second team in a drizzling rain, after we . Yale Divinity School, 
got through with their Varsity. "The Dormitories. 



'22.— F. S. Tucker Is studying now at 

His address is 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



Rise at 7-00 



Breakfast at 7-10 

Good time, you better believe. Ask the fellows who patronize 



Chapel at 7-30 



YE AGGIE INN By the Campus Entrance 



LARGE ORGANIZATION THIS 
IN YEAR R.0. T. C. AT COLLEGE 



Program Includes Much Riding for 
Underclassmen. 

Three times a week now may be seen 
the new recruits on the drill field going 
through with the mysteries of the new 
cavalry drill. With about 150 men 
enrolled in the Freshman class, about 
HO .Sophomores, and some 30 upper 
classmen, four troops lind ample nun 
to till their ranks. A squadron of four 
troops makes an impressive array, and 
when in ceremony two troops are 
mounted, some spectacular reviews may 
be anticipated. 

Captain lirady is again taking charge 
of drill, assisted by Captain Shufelt, 
and Major Kobbe has charge of the rid- 
ing groups. Winter instruction in 
minor tactics for underclassmen will be 
the same as last year, and Juniors and 
Seniors will have advanced instruction. 
The sand box will be available for use 
as soon as a place can be found for it, 
and will supplement map work to some 
extent. I'olo this year will be in out- 
side hours, but it is hoped that a team 
will be formed and several matches ar- 
ranged. 

The si mli'iits are very anxious to see 
a ritle team organized again Ibis winter 
under Captain Shufelt's instruction, 
ami a pistol team has been talked of. 
Although there was no team last year, 
the success of the team of the year be- 
fore makes such an organization ex- 
tremely valuable in an advertising 
sense. 

Hiding, both for service and for ex- 
hibition, will be stressed for upper 
classmen, and as the privilege of taking 
out a horse for pleasure riding is their's, 
it will undoubtedly prove a popular 
amusement. 



FRESHMAN ELEVEN TO PLAY 
ROSARY HIGH IN FIRST GAME 



Loss of Three Men Physically Dis- 
abled Has Weakened Team, 
But Not Permanently. 

The physical examination of the Mili- 
tary Department has slightly dimmed 
i he hopes of the Freshman football 
team by putting Baker, Murphy and 
I'rey on the sidelines due to physical 
disability. All of them were first string 
men and their positions will be hard to 
till. However, the team is fast getting 
into shape for their opening game with 
Kosary H. S. of Ilolyoke on October 20. 
Tlu-y were to have played the lirst con- 
test with West Springtield this Friday 
but at the last moment their opponents 
bached out. They have four games on 
the schedule, all of which are played 
away from home. 

The games are as follows: 

Oct. 20 Kosary EE. B. 
Oct. M Northampton H. S. 
Nov. 3 Deerfiehl Academy 
Nov. 11 Williston Academy 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Kt'UNunahlc I'riees. 
Informal* u Specially 

1" Ho. 1'rospect St.. Amherst. Mdm. 

T*l. BBB-M 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



—OK — 



EXPERIMENT STATION OF COL- 
LEGE SECURES NEW FARM 



THIS YEAR'S ENROLLMENT 

The enrollment of the College as of 
Sept. 20, 1S>22, was as follows: 
Forn Vkak Cot uhk 

Men Women Total 

Fresh men, 10K 20 1M8 

Sophomores, HM 6 D4 

Juniors, 80 6 M 

Seniors. 83 7 00 



Totals, 428 39 
Specials, 7 4 

435 43 


407 
11 

478 


Two Vkak Coubbe 




Seniors, 117 
Juniors, IM 
Vocational Poultry, 10 




203 





Much Needed Research Work To Be 
Carried On Here. 

There was recently added to the Ex- 
periment Station the William 1'. brooks 
Kxperiinenlal Farm, named by theTrus- 
tees in honor of the former Director of 
the Station. 

The farm lies immediately mirth of 
the present station land. It is well 
suited for experimental use, and will 
be used to carry on some much needed 
research work on onions and tobacco. 

It is a very old farm, and part of its 
land has been in cultivation over a cen- 
tury and a hall. It also has some land 
only recently cleared, and a small piece 
of about an acre which has never yet 
been cultivated. The farm today is in 
a highly productive state. 

Problems of research which will be 
investigated on this land include 
Btudies of the effect of the single-crop 
system on the yields of tobacco and 
onions, studies in insect and plant dis- 
ease control, and studies of the proper 
fertilization of tobacco and onions. 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICKS 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCOKI'OKATKI) 

273-270 Blfb St., Ilolyoke 

Tml. WB2-10B3 



S. S. HYDE 

<>i>tl«jl«ta* oiui Jeweler 

y Pleasant Street (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Brokm Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Hig Hen Alarm (locks and other ItHluhle Makes 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst ... Mass. 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing, Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

liny your i>resRing ticket from lt.<iaiii/.iif '2;i 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

ncrcss.m aslaa*. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Home Broa. Neckwmar 

Order your next Suit or Overcoat here now. 
Beit HleettODJ of WooletiH in the latest pat 

teres aleajg ea head. The highiniaiity of our 
work ix apparent on fancy gajaaaelS Try us! 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor end Haberdasher. 

II Amity St. Next to Weatem diion Tel. Office 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 



Tel. 489-W 



V. I). HOMANS, 

Prop. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Rmpalrlny Whllm U Wall 

NKW I'ltlt'KH 

Men's Whole SoIch. Kulihei Heels . . $2.50 
.Men n Half Solex. Kuhlier MeeN . . . $1.75 
Men's Rabbet Soles. Kuhher Heels . . $2.25 

Men's Half Soles $1.35 

Work Guaranteed— AMIIKKST Hoi SK 



Delta l'hi Gamma is planning a bacon 

hat for all the four-year irirls to Monti t 
Tobj on Columbus day. The party 
will leave on the 2-30 car, ami come 
back on the 7-00 o'clock car. 



YOUR MONEY IS WORTH MORE HERE 

No matter whether you are buying a suit, overcoat or pair of sox, 
we can give you more real valje than the average merchant. 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Heavy-weight Overcoats, $30.00 to $50.00 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Suits 

Kirschbaum Suits from .... 

White Oxford Shirts 

Heavy All-wool Plaid Shirts 
Moleskin or Khaki Riding Breeches 

Golf Hose from 

Light-weight All-wool Golf Sweaters from . 



$35.00 to $42.50 

$25.00 up 

$2.00 and $2.50 

$5.00 

. $3.75 

$1.75 to $4.00 

$5.00 to $12.00 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over Thirty-five Years. 



October the 14th is Candy Week 

and are running special 

"APOLLO" CLASS A at $1.25 per box 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 






'» 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOAKI) OF EDITORS. 



luviN.i W.Si.Ai-r. 9J Bdltor-ln-Chtef 

|,i niK.it It. Arrinuton '28 Managing Kdltor 

ABSOCIATK KlMTOKB. 
John S. Ki-Ai.'24 ABB't Man'g Kdltor 

A i .BEltr K. W A. oil >M Athletic Kdltor 

tOLOMOM COSSM '23 

John M. Whittirk'28 

L. FRANCIS KKSNKI.V '24 

Rom M. VVipon '24 

i.KwiH ii. Kbits '25 

< nutl.K.H F. Ol.nKlt, .lit. '2.'. 



Bobinbbb Department. 
Owen E. Folbom '2S Business Manager 

Rohkrt K. BlBBB ■ '24 Advertising Manager 
CUVBOBO I.. Mun '24 t'lreulatlon Manager 

llllNAI.ll W. I.KW l»'S 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered »s second clan matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act 
•f October. 1917 authorlied August 20. 1918. 



Coming to Terms. 
Harvard. Yale, and Princeton, the 
"Hit; Three" in athletics, at last are pro- 
posing a policy, concretely stated, 
which if carried out will mean a drastic 
change in collegiate sports begiBBtag 
with int. In order to l»rin» out the 

defalk the fall report <>f the presidents 

of the three institutions lias been 
printed below. Curtailing; <>f football 
schedules, elimination of pie-season 
practice, and dcliannent of the "tramp 
athlete" or transfer students arc essen- 
tial changes. These new regulali'Mis 
have a valnaMe siynilicanee in promot- 
ing wholesome college life. Profes- 
sional football will come to a close, and 
natural enrollment on merit will resell. 
What Mass. Aggie has always stood (of 
is voluntarily accepted as the ideal to 
be aimed at In future athletics of tome 
of the leading colleges. 

I. — "Financial assistance or induce- 
ments: 

The university committee on eligi- 
bility shall in advance of competition, 
require of eacli candidate for competi- 
tion in any sport a detailed statement 
of the source of his financial rapport, 
including any sums earned during va- 
cation. In the case of each athlete 
who is shown to have received financial 
aid from others than those on whom lie 
is naturally dependent for support, the 
committee shall then, in advance of 
his competition, submit the facts to the 
committee of the three chairmen (re- 
presenting the three universities), which 
shall decide upon his eligibility. 

In cases in which the motives for ex- 
tending aid to an athlete are not clear 
to the committee of the three chairmen, 
that committee shall take into account 
failure on the part of the athlete to 
maintain a creditable record in his 
academic course in character, scholar- 
ship and willingness to meet his obliga- 
tions, as evidence that a continuance of 
financial aid to the athlete OB grounds 
Of character, scholarship and conduct 
seems unwise, and that therefore the 
committee may have to declare him in- 
eligible. 

In interpreting rules land 2 below, 
the committee <>t the three chairmen 



shall take into consideration the mo- 
tives of those who gave the aid and the 
motives of those who received it. 

1. No man who lias ever teceived 
any pecuniary reward or its equivalent 
by reason of his connection with ath- 
letics-whet her for playing, coaching 
or acting as teacher in any branch of 
sport or engaging therein in any ca- 
pacity-shall represent his university 
in any athletic team or crew, except 
that the committee of three chairmen 
may permit such participation in inter- 
collegiate athletics by men who might 
lechmically l»e debarred under the let- 
ter of the rule, hut who, in the judg- 
ment of the oommltee, have BOl com- 
mercialized their athletic ability nor 
offended against the spirit of the fore- 
going provision. 

Committee Must Appbotx. 

'2,.— No student shall represent his 
university in any athletic team or crew 
Who receives, from others than those on 
whom he is naturally dependent for 
financial support, money by gifl or 
loan, or the equivalent of money, such 
as board ami lodging, etc., unless the 
source of these gifts or payments to him 
shall he approved by the committee of 
three chairmen on t lie ground that 
they have not accrued to him primarily 
because of his ability as an athlete. 

IL— Scholarships: 

Awards' of all scholarships, prizes, 
and of all loans made by the university 
and the terms and the names of the 
red pleats of all scholarships and prises 
shall he published in the catalogue of 
the university. 

III.— Athletic status of the so-called 
transletieil student : 

Any student who transfers to Har- 
vard, Vale or Princeton from another 
college or university after this agree 
meiit goes into effect shall be ineligible 
to represent Harvard, Vale or l'rinccion 
in any sport in which he represented 

bis former college or university on any 

university or Freshman team while 
playing against opponents not members 
of that institution. 



VI. Football games: 

1. The training of teams shall not 
begin at the university Off elsewere prior 
to the week before the university opens. 

g, The number of intercollegiate 
games shall be reduced to a number 
.-.insistent with the shortened season 

prescribed in the preceding paragraph. 

\\. No p> ist -season contests, or con- 
tests for the purpose of settling section- 
al or other championships, or involving 
long and expensive trips, or extended 
absence from the university, shall be 
permitted. 

4. The Freshman team shall not be 
absent from the college for more than 
two games in a season. 

6. The efforts of the central board of 
Officials to uphold the fearless adminis- 
tration of the rules and the mainte- 
nance of the highest standards of sports- 
manship are endorsed heartily. 

VII.— Athletic schedules: 

In making Of schedules effort shall be 
made, so far as possible, to arrange con- 
tests only with teams representing insti- 
tutions employing similar standards of 
eligibility and similar training methods. 

Vlll.— Athletic publicity: 

The matter of publicity shall be sub- 
ject to constant supervision and study 
in an effort to lessen undue emphasis 
upon athletics in general and football 
in particular. 

IX.— The foregoing regulations shall 
go into effect Jan. I, IflSsV' 



Town Hall, Amherst 

rjyt j May Murray, Vincent Cole- 

1 llUrStltiy man ;i i, .1 Courtenay Foots in 
"Fascination." l.vcry Mae 
Murray production Is a guar- 
antee of ;t beautiful and lav- 
| ten production. ToldwttbaU 
Mat. 3, K\ <-. 1 1, ,- romance of old Spain. 
6-45.8-30 j New , Comedy 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



Mat. 3, Kve 
6-45 8-30 



Tom Douglas and Marjorie 
Seaman in"Fre« Air," from 
the kteturdai Evening Poet 
Story by Sinclair Lewis, au- 
thor <>f "Main Street." It's 
an automobile picture. 
Sport Review. "Stamina" 
I reel Mack Sennett Comedy 

Constance Binney and Jack 
Mulhall in "The Sleep- 
walker." Story of a con- 
vent-bred lilrl who is sudden 
ly plunged into iatrtsuea pro- 
voked by the financial ludis- 
crotlona <>f bet mo th e r . 

News 

Larry Semon in "His Home, 

Sweet Home." 



Marion Davies and Forrest 
Stanley in "Beauty's 
Worth," by Sophie Kerr. A 

brilliai t C edy in which a 

simple Quaker maiden turns 

into a BOCtety belle. 

Pathe Review, lT I Comedy 



College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 



Hair Bobbing 

Facial Massage 

Head Treatment 



Mi si I'av Own EXPBBSMS. 

1 7.— Proselyting la prep a r a t o r y 
schools: 

The three uimersil ies wholly disap- 
prove of all propaganda either through 
special inducements Of thorough dts- 
paragemenl ol other institutions to in 
duce boys in the schools to yo to a par- 
ticular institution. The defraying of 
part or all of the expenses of visiting a 
university by anyone except the persons 
on whom a boy is naturally dependent 
may lie interpreted to disqualify him 
from represent lug that university in any 
Intercollegiate sport, if, in the Judge- 
ment of the committee of the three 
chairmen, such aid was given to induce 
the recipient to enter that institution. 
V.— Coaching system : 

1. It should be the aim of each Uni- 
versity, as far as practicable to have the 
Coaching of all teams done only by 
members of the regular stall'. 

2. No coach shall receive for his ser- 
vice any money or other valuable con- 
sideration except through the university 
authorities. 

8. While under contract no coach 
shall write for publication on the sub- 
ject of athletics without first submit- 
ting for approval by the university au- 
thorities any articles intended for 
publication. 

4. The provisions of paragraph! 8 
and 3 shall be incorporated in any con- 
tract hereafter made with an athletic 
coach. 



Food for Thought. 
"Why go to college'.'" is not the only 
question that should be fairly reviewed 
in t tie mind of the average man, but 
''Am I fitted and cajiahle of assimilat- 
ing the necessary knowledge which the 
college man should acquire to receive 
the maximum benefit from the large 

expense involved-.'" Today all efforts 

seem lo be exerted in the one direction 

.>i inflneneiBgboystoattsad a collegiate 

institution and convincing parents that 
such a course is to be desired. Asa 
result there is not room in our colleges 
for all those who seek admission, and 
this is not because too many men are 
going to college as that the wrong kind 
of men are going. 

Of course all young persons who 
really want an education should have 
it. but it is a different kind of an edu- 
cation than given in the classical Amer- 
ican college that most would get the 
greatest advantage from. The Ameri- 
can colleges patterned on the English 
colleges Of Oxford and Cambridge are 
crowded to the doors. 

Trade schools maintained and oper- 
ated by the large industrial enterprises 
for the education of employees, the 
purely vocational institutions, and the 
V. M. C. A. colleges of the practical na- 
ture are receiving a large influx of those 
interested in the enlargement of their 
capacities to perform better work. It is 
in these latter institutions that a pro- 
portion of the collegiate inclined stu- 
dents belong. Kvery man should be ed- 
ucated, but few are mentally or morally 
benetitted by a four years' stay in the 
more abstract colleges. 

It is true that purely vocational insti- 
tutions are well patronised as well as 
the classical college, but what of the 
institution that comes "in between" as 
we might say? There are some institu- 
tions of this middle type among which 
M. A. C. falls which have not received 
the consideration they are justified in 
having. The extremes are crowded, the 
mean is only normally used. Perhaps 
this mean is the solution of the prob- 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 
Eevrything All "Write" Here 




no matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Pens, 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc 
Every article is warranted, and our 
prices are as low as you will find any 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing;. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

How to get acquainted— 
Attend a club night dance. 

Every other Wednesday, starting Oct. 25th 

Enjoyable e\ eninir spent with con- 
genial roans p e op le guaranteed. 

Every FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Beginning Sept. 29th. 

Popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone Tfil Northern pt"" 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order • $35.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suits Pressed 50e Military Tailoring 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1*>22. 




ISO STORE CAN SERVE TWO MAST1KS 

€ACII store must choose between price and quality. Selling to the very larsiest 
possible . inmbers, quality must oft be subordinated. For quantity and 
quality do not always mix. Knowing that true quality best serves Collcile 
men, the steadfast WALSH policy is to confine all efforts to your demands. 

Ever and always, CONSULT WALSH 



lent of education. Time will tell. Ii 
the aim of college traininy la a breadth 
of knowledge eoveriai the (real Belda 

Ol literal ore, science, history, and art as 
the lirst object, and the mastery of some 
one subject as the other result, then 
M. A. 0. tils the case with a tolerably 
excellent degree of perfection, and is 
worlhy of a greater attendance in the 
future. 



Music in the Air. 
With t he air full of music and enter- 
tainment every Bight, it seems too had 
that the college cannot eojoj some of 
it. Already several men on the cam- 
pus have set up radio seis where every 
oigbt a small group gatbera to smoke, 

talk, and listen to the WYX program 
sent out from Springfield. 

The plan should work equally well 
for a large troop as it does for i small 
oue. Social Union entertainments 
come hut rarely, and as a consequence 
the only time the college can congre- 
«ate for enjoyment is on the average Ot 
once a month. 

The Bpriagfleld prograai is one of 
admitted excellence, ami the college 
should not feel that it is allowing a 
class of entertainment any less heneli- 
cial or delightful than our (ilee Club Of 
Social Union recitals, when they allow 
a radiophone out lit to he installed. 

Whether .Social [Talon funds might 
he appropriated tOWarda the purchase 
of an adequate receiving set wiihanam- 
plilier ol magnitude such that music 
would till the Memorial Building hall, 
or whether popular subscription nigh) 
he the means of procuring the set, 
would be a question to be settled later, 
but at present the need is very decided 
for some form of inexpenaive entertain- 
ment through the week, ami the com- 
parative low cost and almost negligible 
upkeep of a good radio receiving set 
which would more than repay its coal 
in pleasure and in making of fiiends 
among the undergraduates, should 
make such a proposition worthy of 
serious consideration. 







NEW APPOINTMENTS TO 

PROFESSIONAL STAFF 

Dr. Charles P. Alexander, Assistant 
Professor of Kntoinology, 12(1 Pleas- 
ant street. 

Miss Mary K. Hartley, Instructor in 
Home BeonOBsloa, 60 1'leasaiit street. 

Herbert 1,. Collins, Instructor in 1'ysi- 
cal Kdiication, :!.". Worth Prospect 
street. 

Philip K. Pom, Instructor in Zoology, 
42 Lincoln avenue. 

Boberl 1). llawley, Supervisor of Kx- 
hibits and Kxtension Courses, f> 
Hitchcock street. 

Frank «. Kokoski, Analyst, Kxperi- 
ment Station, Northampton road. 

Mis. Marie B. Marsh, Matron, Women's 
Dormitory, Adams House. 

Job a .1. Smith. Analyst, Veterinary 
Science. !l Phillips street. 

Clan' B. Snyder, Instructor in Vegeta- 
ble Cardening, 17 Fearing street. 

Lewis W. Taylor, Instructor in Poultry 
Husbandry, Poultry Plant. 

Mi>s Marion L. Tucker, Kxtension As- 
sistant Professor of Home Kconom- 
ics, 46 Pleasant ■treat, 



Cbompsoif $ Cimclp Calks 

Why not a < l:i|'l> -Kustiiian Itailln Set III your 
Maternity house .' I he 1,,-hI y„„ can buy for the 
money. Come in and talk it over with "Dave " 
the radio man. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



PRIVATE OANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mill* Studio, i, Poa« 4fMt-H, P. O. Block 



FRESHMEN ENTERTAINED BY 
PRESIDENT LAST FRIDAY 

President and Mrs. P.utterlield wel- 
comed the Freshmen at a reception in 
their home. last Friday evening, A 
large number of the Freshmen were 
present. Misses Skinner and Hamlin. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hand, ami Mrs. tiore were 
among the quests. Staging of the col- 
fa songs was enjoyed daring part of 
'he evening Refreshments of ice cream 
and cake were served. 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT TO BE 
HELD ON OCT. 28 THIS YEAR 

World Aggie Night this year will be 
held Saturday eveniim, Oct. 28, and il 
is expected that the usual meeting of 
Aggie alumni will be held in different 
cities ami towns throughout the United 
States. The Washington Alumni Club 
bare already notified the Alumni Oflice 
ol their intention lo have a big get-to- 
gether of M. A. C. alumni at the 
Capital. 



DELTA PHI ALPHA PLEDGES 

Delta Phi Alpha Fraternity an- 
nounces the pledging of the following 
men : 

Kmil J. Oonrta '2"» 
Samuel Culler ii»i 
J.ouis Qoren 'ju 

Joseph I, cedes '2H 
Leo Novick '*(! 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Alpha Gamma Bho announces the 
iging of Locke James "24. a transfer 
this year from M. I. T. 

because of an omission in the last 
edition of the Cot.i. iiiiw, we wish to 
announce the pledging of .Stephen Har- 
ris hy the (}. T. V. fraternity. 



NOTICE 

The following pfel in | for the 11)24 
In-hs will be taken at Mills' Studio, 
next Sunday morning, Oat. 15. 

10-00 a. M. Kappa (.annua Phi. 

10-16 \. m. Kappa Sigma. 

10-30 \. m. ( oi.j.i;<;ian Hoard. 

1I1-4.J a. m. Informal Committee. 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*. Drumm, etc.. Re heading 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Htg.. BpctecteM. 



Local Agent. 
B. A. PENN. 12 Woodside Avenue. Amherst. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 41&-W) Hadley. Mass 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Awav 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
Sec them in our window 



F»a«;«3's» Shoe JSto 



r«3 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKALKItH IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



Our Overcoats make warm friends of 
those wbo sell them and those who wear 
them. 

Overcoats 

Topcoats 

Norfolks 

The new and popular Norfolk Suits 
are the latest. We have them and they 
are the real Norfolks. Drop in and get 
fixed up before the game. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER — exclusive 

Amherst House Mock 



OVEK ADAMS' DSUG STORE 



The Mmmdbmm Collegian. Wednesday, October 11, W2._ 




Save Up 



Your Pennies 



and 



Go to 



T 



THE BKST IN 



M\SS PRESS ASSOCIATION 
HAS LUNCH AT DRAPER HALL Drug StoreJUrchandue 



Unique Luncheon Composed Wholly 
Of M. A. C. Products. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Tin. Kexall .Store 



TI.eMasHiM-lmsotls PrtM aaaofllatioo 

WM entertained at Drapai Hall at 

lOBcheoa last Mu.ula.v by the faculty. 

Tb« Vssoriation is on its annual aXCUr- 

tlon.aad Hopped ofl tow aftar atrip 

0W the Mohawk Trail. This fTOUp 
npTMenU tlM journalistic Irat t-mity in 
Massachusetts to a large eMHil, as n 
U eompOMd oi editors Of daily ami 

weekly p»p«» throughout the "late. 
The luncheon itself was worthy of 

notice as it was unique in that tho food 
(01 every course was raisc.l right lore 
on the campus, and hcsi.les that the 
whole menu would... akc a hungry man's 

mouth water. 
Crisp M. A.c .-elcy wi<l« craoken 

followed the sou,), and then btowaed 

and parsley-sprinkled, roast whole M. 

A. C, chickens were btOOght on ami 

M Wad at the table, Drawing and gib- 

let sauce complemented the birds, ami 
[01 vegetables, mounds of mashed M.A. 
C. potaloei »Bd buttered If. A.C. tur- 
nips were brought on Little at. a.< • 

.named onions were much appreciated. 
Bnd roll, with M. A.C. butter and M. 
\. ( . jelly Idled out the main portion 

of the meal. 
Sparkling W* cold cider that bubbled 

in the pitchers, served with s.,uash pie. 

also If. A. C. raised ami made, and If. 
\. ('. OOttagJ chee-c completed the 
iggifl luncheon. 

The menu card given to all t he visitors 
,,n,,l also to state the collets pur- 
pose : the percentage of students from 

tDe different eoaatiee, expanaea ■ eta- 
deal will have at oollege, and laforaM 
tion ragardlag student labor. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 



The Store of Quality and Service 

invites your attention 
to oiu line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We carry 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 

— IN — 

Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



—THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for tirstclass 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

U l'leasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 

CANDIES AND FRUITS 



sing lece: 

Main Street 

Quicl< Laundry 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



ABIGAIL ADAMS HOUSE HAS 
NEW MATRON FOR THIS YEAR 

Mrs. Marie 1'.. Marsh came to the 
Auyie tacullv iMl week to be .natron 

of the Abigail AdaaM Hooee. 

Mrs. Ma.sh ie eminently fitted to be 
:i wisean.l sympathetic house mother, 

for she has had a rich, varied expe- 
rience will. jroOBf people, both as a 
teacher ami as a social worker. 

A native oi Boatoa, Mis. Marsh has 
travelled a good .lea), bavins: lived 
abroad at various times, and eomlBg 1" 

us after a summer in England. 

Mrs. Marsh lived a number oi veals 

i„ Cambridge, where her husband ..<•- 

copied the chair of Comparative l.ile.a- 
tnn at Harvard. Mu- has two sons and 

a daughter. 

she is a graduate "t the school of 
Social Economy <>i Wanhlngtea UaWer- 

siiy in St. boms, and has taken a grad- 
uate course in institutional u.ana-e- 
M.eiit at Simmons College. 

|.\,i several veals she has been house- 
mot her at t he llatheway BroWB School 
for (.iris, a preparatory school in Cleve- 
land. 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and pron.|dy done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money bj buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



After Every 

Meal 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pail 



— on- 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Ammteur Developing and Printing 

Hills Studio-Phone 456-R 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGING 
TEAM IS SECOND AT ST. PAUL 

On Monday the Dairy l>ei>artment re- j 
ceived word that the Dairy Product i 
judging team, consisting of llievvn. 

Heath, end Goldstein, TO, bad taken 

second (dace at the National Dairy 
SboW at St. Paul. Minn., at which they 
were iu.l-inu. with eight other team- 

competing. Brewei was also high 

scorer in judging market milk. A 
complete aniiouncuiei.t of the results 
will be known bj next week. 




The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



C-4* - 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



M. M. RICHARDSON 23, Manager 



T. T. ABELE 23 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



W. S. DIMOCK '22 



The only store in town owned and operated by undergraduates. 



Send 



in 



Your 



Subscription 



to 



the 



Collegian 



NOW 



H. E. WEA THERWAX 22 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Huilding, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non-AtliKtii Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The Collegian, 
Hockey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Ag^ie Squib, 
Musical Clubs, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 

C. S. Hicks, Ceneral Mgr., 403-M 

I\ P. Rand, Manager 136 R 

Roger B. Friend, President 720 

Perry C Partlett, Manager. 8325 

John M. VVhittier, Manager 170 

Charles \V. Steele, Manager 8325 

Irving W. Slade, Kditor 170 

Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 

Philip B. Dovden, Manager 

(lustav Lindskog, Manager 

T. T. Abelc, Editor 

Thomas I,. Snow, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, (). K. FolsOBB, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard P. Smith, Manager 

Y. M. C. A., Frederick B, Cook, President 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



S30 

«33<> 

720 

83'4 
83'4 



BUY YOUR 



SHOES and HOSIERY 



From our store if 



WANT TO SAVE MONEY 

We guarantee you good shoes at lower prices. 

SHOE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

Four skilled shoe makers lined up and 
ready to repair your shoes while you 
wait, on the basis that you must be 
satisfied. Try it, you will like our service. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

ON Vol :• WAY TO THE POST OFFICE 

DAMERST ® FOTOS, Prop. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



oid Deerfieid Fertilizers Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 



"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGG1NS, INC., South Deerfield, Mass 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$l.1u l>y mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 






The Massachusetts 



Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



THE BEST IN 



MASS PRESS ASSOCIATION 

HAS LUNCH AT DRAPER HALL Drug StoreMerchan^se 

HENRY ADAMS & CO 



Unique Luncheon Composed Wholly 
Of M. A. C. Products. 



Save Up 



The liexall Store 



Your Pennies 



and 



Go to 



The MMMObiuetta Prats AM©ct»tlon 
was entertained at Draper Hall at 

lull( . lll . llll | M | Monday b* the faculty. 
The Association is on its annual excur- 
sion, sad stopped off hew ati-T atrip 

,,v,r the Mohawk Trail. This group 

represents the journalistic fraternity in 
Massachusetts to a large extent, as it 
is eompoeed ol edltore of daily and 

weekly papen tbronghOUt the state. 

The' luncheon itself was worthy of 
notice as it was unique in that the food 
for every course was raised right here 
on the campus, and hesides that the 
whole mom wouldmake a hungry man's 
month water. 

Crisp M. A.C. eelery with crackers 
followed the soup, and theuhiowncd 
and parsley-sprinkled, roast whole M. 
A. C chickens were hroii-ht on and 

M-rved at the table. Dreeelng and glb- 

],•( sauce complemented the birds, and 

for vegetables, mounds of mashed M. A. 

C. potatoes and huttered If. A.C. tur- 
nips were brOOgbl on. Uttle M. k. C, 

erca.ned onions were much appreciated, 

aBdt olls with M. A. C. bnttei and M. 

A. C. jelly lille.l out the main portion 
of the meal. 

Sparkling lee cold cider that bubbled 

in (he pitchers, served with s.,uash pie, 
also II. A. C raised ami made and M. 
A. ('. cottage cheese completed the 

Aggie luncheon. 

The menu card given to all the visitors 
served also to state the college's pur- 
pose: "he percentage of Students from 

the different eouut lee, expenses ■ stu- 
dent will have at eollegc. and informa 
tion regarding student labor. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEOEO, CONSULT US 

W. B.~DRURY 

10 Main Street. 



Tuft 



The Store of Quality and Service 

iDVltM JTOUT attention 
lo our line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We cany 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 

— is — 

Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 



ABIGAIL ADAMS HOUSE HAS 
NEW MATRON FOR THIS YEAR 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



— TttY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirst -class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

It Pleasant St.. Amherst, Mass. 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 

SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



orange: store 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Ama ,eur Developing mnd Printing 

Hills Studio-Phone 456-R 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pail 

— on — 

Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



Mrs. Marie B. Marsh came to the 

Aggie faculty last week to be matron 
of the Abigail Adams House. 
Mrs. Ifarafa l« eminently Btted to i>e 

a «ise an. I sympathetic DOOM mother, 
foi sbe has ha-1 a rich, varie.l expe- 
rience w'ni> young people, '»>tii as ■ 
teacher end a> a social worker. 

A native of Boston, Hts. Marsh has 
travelled a good donl, having lived 

ftbroad at various times, ami ( lin| to 

ns after ■ smnmer in England. 

Mrs. Maish lived a ntimhcr oi years 

in Cambridge, where net husband do- 

copied the chair of Comparative l.ileia- 
tnre at Uarvar.l. She has two sons and 

a daughter. 

She is a graduate of the School of 

Social Rconomj of Washington 1'niver 

B |t 3 in St. I.onis, and has taken a grad- 
uate course in Institutional manaue- 
ment at Blmmons College. 

For several years she lias beOB house- 
mother at the Hathaway BrownBebool 
lot (.iris, a preperatotj school InCleTe- 

land. 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 

Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suit* Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Tel. 9-J 



DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGING 
TEAM IS SECOND AT ST. PAUL 

On Monday the Dairy Department re- 
ceived word tl'at the Dairy Products 
lodging team, consisting ol Brewer, 
Heath, ami Goldstein, S-'y. bad taken 
■•cond placa at the National Dairy 
BboW at St. Paul. Minn., at which they 

were judging, with eight other teams 
competing. Brewet was also bigfc 

scorer in judging market milk. A 
complete announcmenl ol tlie results 

will be known by next week. 




The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



C-*»jz 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11, 1922. 



T. T. ABELE 23 



M. M. RICHARDSON '23, Manager 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



W. S. DIMOCK '22 



The only store in town owned and operated by undergraduates. 



Send 



in 



Your 



Subscription 



to 



the 



Collegian 



NOW 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

" Treasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfielo. Mass 



THE NEW M. A, C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$i.io by ni.iii. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



H. E. WEA THERWAX 22 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Iluilding, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

Non-Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

The ( 'ollegian, 

U(k key Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical ( lubs. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Tslssfross 

Richard Melleu, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 

C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 

1\ P. Rand, Manager 136 R 

Roger B. Friend, President 720 

IViry <;. Hartlett, Manager. 8325 

John M. Whittier, Manager 170 

t'harles \V. Steele, Manager 8325 

Irving W. Slade, Kditor 170 
Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 
Philip B. Dowdt'i), Manager 
Gustav Lindslcog, Manager 
T. T. Abrlc. Kditor 
Thomas I,. Snow, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, < ). K. Folsom, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard & Smith, Manager 
Y. M. C. A., Frederick 1$. Cook, President 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Managi-r 



53° 

S33<> 

720 

»3'4 
8314 



BUY YOUR 



SHOES and HOSIERY 



Prom our store if 



WANT TO SAVE MONEY 

We guarantee you good shoes at lower prices. 

SHOE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

I our skilled shoe makers lined up and 
ready to repair your shoes while you 
wait, on the basis that you must be 
satisfied. Try it, you will like our service. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

ox voir \va\ TO rm; post OFFICE 

DAMERST $ F0T0S, Prop. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 11. 1922. 



ARE YOU READY FOR COLD WEATHER? 

The best outfit for campus weather or cold fall mornings is a heavy plaid flannel shirt and corduroy 
riding breeches- they give enduring service. Get the habit of making this your clothing headquarters 
and you will only be following the lead of those who know where to get what they want. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS £ GAULT 

College Outfitters. 



GLEE CLUB TRYOUTS 

Continued from p**e 1 



Second Basses— Bennett '23, Whittier 
>99, Sandow "23, C4old '23, Noyes '24, 
Henneberry '2tt, Buckucmt "2«, Burn- 
ham '2o\ 

Anyone who can play an instrument 
other than a mandolin is asked to come 
out. It will be the policy of the orcheH- 
tra this year to learn at least four con- 
cert pieces as well as to play for danc- 
ing. If possible there will a banjo 
quartette formed. 



C0NSTRCT10N NOTES 

Two more bowling alleys are in con- 
struction in the basement of the Me- 
morial Building, to accommodate lovers 
of bowling this year, and from all re- 
ports they will be ready for use in 
about four weeks. These will take up 
the space to the right of the old alleys 
which was more or less of an eyesore 
all last year. The pool and billiard 
tables have also been inspected this 
summer and are ready for use. 

Construction on the new chemical 
building, Goessman Laboratory, is pro- 
gressing, and the exterior work of the 
basement floor is practically finished. 
The scaffolding on the east wing side of 
the tirst floor is being removed, and it 
is expected that the workmen will start 
cementing in a few days. 



r* 



RESOLUTIONS 

Whereax, it has pleased God in his 
infinite wisdom to take from this life 
our beloved brother, Dr. James B. 
Paige, therefore, 

lie it Etuhti that we hereby express 
our deep sense of grief and loss at hiH 
death, and our sincere sympathy for 
his relatives in their great sorrow, and. 
Further, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be published in the Mttssttchuxettx 
Colleyhin. 

The Q. T. V. Fraternity, 
J. Gilbert Pakbonh 
Norman D. Hii.yaki> 

For the Fraternity. 



ALUMNI 

'19— Mr. and Mrs. Win. C. Langroise 
announce the marriage of the daughter, 
Norman Fay, to Mr. Raymond Thurston 
Parkhurst on Sunday July 30 at 
Moscow, Idaho. At home after Oct. 1 
at Woodworth apartment. 

'15.— H. H. Archibald is principal of 
the Natick High School, after nerving 
in that same capacity in the Bridge- 
water Uigh School. 

'16.— A daughter, Elizabeth Hitch- 
•cock, was born to Mr. and Mrs. William 
S. Coley of Westport, Conn., on June 25. 
Mr. Coley is now teaching chemistry 
and physics in the Bridgeport High 
School. 

'19.— Mr. and Mrs. George N. Peck of 
Barre announce the arrival of Arthur 
Howard on Sept. 23. 

'22.— John G. Lowery is teaching 
chemistry in the Mt. Ida Sohool for 
girls. 



C&rptn-ter & Morehous<t, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherat, Mam 



F P O \f GILBERTS 




D E At ji G .V K T E 



* 



"Word Mongers'W 
"Chattering Barbers" 

"Word -roneers" and "chartering barbers," Gilbert called 
those of his predecessors who asserted that a wound made 
by a magnetized needle was painless, that a magnet will 
attract silver, that the diamond will draw iron, that the 
magnet thirsts ancTdies in the absence of iron, that a magnet, 
pulverized and taken with sweetened water, will cure 
headaches and prevent fat. 

Before Gilbert died in 1603, he had done much to explain 
magnetism and electricity through experiment. He found 
that by hammering iron held in a magnetic meridian it can 
be magnetized. He discovered that the compass needle «s 
controlled by the earth's magnetism and that one magnet 
can remagnetize another that has lost its power. He noted 
the common electrical attraction of rubbed bodies, among 
them diamonds, as well as glass, crystals, and stones,, and 
was the first to study electricity as a distinct force. 

"Not in books, but in things themselves, look for Knowl- 
edge," he shouted. This man helped to revolutionize methods 
of thinking— helped to make electricity what it has become. 
His fellow men were little concerned with him and his experi- 
ments. "Will Queen Elizabeth marry— and whom?" they 
were asking. 

Elizabeth's flirtations mean little td us. Gilbert's method 
means much. It is the method that has made modern 
electricity what it has become, the method which enabled 
the Research Laboratories of the f reneral Electric Com- 
pany to discover new electrical principles now applied in 
transmitting power for hundreds of miles, in lighting homes 
electrically, in aiding physicians with the X-rays, in freeing 
civilization from drudgery. 

General^Elecftric 

general Office COmparty ScHenectaJy. MV 






Coil»... 



oll to|fk , 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



No. 3 



JAMES B. PAIGE, B. St, D. V. S. TEAM MAK,NG N0 promises prof, graves of yale talks 



Student, Veterinarian, Politician, and 
Teacher. 

James Iireckenridge Paige, B. 8c, 
I). V. S,, who died Oct. 5, was bom in 
the year 1851. lie was a graduate of 
thin college, going oiil with the class 
of 1882, one of the most t anions classes 
in the annals of (his insiitmion. He 
was professor, as well as the head of 
the department of Veterinary .Science 
in this college from the year 181H) until 
his death. lie served as a member of 
the State Legislature in 1901 and 1904 
ami was Acting-Dean of the college 
from 1900 to 1911 during the absence of 
Dean Mills. 



Dr. Paige was connected with the 
college for over 4(1 years. A member of 
the elass of 1882, he has always been in 
closest touch wilh the activities of the 
tinlents, alumni and faculty. As a 
student he took part in athletics and 
never ceased to have a real interest in 
our sports. But lately it was a com- 
mon sight to see him coaching a band 
of youngsters in baseball, evidently 
enjoying the game as much as the chil- 
dren. He belonged to Q. T. V. ami 
was an active fraternity man. Ho was 
particularly proud of bis collection of 
student publications which, I believe. 
is absolutely complete. 

llewasa great worker. His activi- 
ties look many forms. He loved es- 
pecially to work wilh his hands, and in 
i his he was extraordinarily versatile. 
It was a delight to visit him in his work- 
shop, where be wrought in wood and 
metal. He connived an ingenious 
machine to count the bees in a hive; 
he was an expert at restoring antique 
liirniture; he turned baseball bats for 
the cliques of little lads whom he loved 
no well; this last year of protracted 
illness he busied himself with pottery, 
these and many other things he did 
with skill and precision. It was the 
>atne with bis work as a teacher ami 
-cientist. He had the gift of being 
able to accomplish a great amount of 
Continued on page 7 



ON OUTCOME WITH AMHERST 



Record Crowd, Including Large Num- 
ber of Alumni, Expected to Wit- 
ness Second Annual Contest. 

Next Saturday sees t he second annual 
football classic between Aggie and 
Amherst since the breaking off of foot- 
hall relations about 15 years ago. The 
teams seem to be evenly matched al- 
though they have not played any of 
the same teams, so that no accurate 
judgment of their comparative worths 
can be made. The Mass. Aggie coaches, 
when approached by our reporter as 
the paper was going to pies*, stated 
that they were "neither optimisiic nor 
pessimistic". Naturally interest is at a 
high pitch and speculation as to the 
outcome is rife, but, with Amhci^t 
playing football on Alumni Field for 
the lirst time in history, it is certain 
that there will be a good crowd on 
hand. 

Many alumni of both institutions are 
planning to attend and the seating fa- 



ON FOREST CONSERVATION 



0S-ti4-f- * 



RICHMOND H. SARGENT TO 
HEAD 1923 BASEBALL TEAM 

Due to an oversight (he announce- 
ment of the election of Richmond II. 
Hock) Sargent to the captaincy id base- 
ball for the coming season was omitted 
I torn the last issue. "Iluck" has been 
active in many lines while at college. 
He was a member of his class football, 
baseball, baskethall, and rifle teams 
during his Freshman year, has often 
been class captain, has played varsity 
football and baseball, was a member of 
lie Informal Committee, and chairman 
Of his Soph-Senior Hop Committee. He 
has also been a mainstay of the Aggie 
band. He is a member of the Kappa 
Sigma Fraternity. 




K. S. CLAW '2:i Amherst Right Tackle 

cilities will be taxed to the utmost. 
Already some of the graduate cohorts 
are beginning to assemble. Monday 
there was on the campus a man named 
(lark who played end on the team that 
beat Amherst :\H years ago. And still 
Continued on page 2 



Ilow our opp 


ments fared last Sat- 


urday : 




Amherst 13 


Unioii 


Tufts 6 


Williams 


Batai 7 


Colby 7 


Cornell 00 


X. H. State 7 


Stevens 


Hamilton 


Wabash 90 


Michigan Aggies 



Impresses Students with Need of 

Guarding Our Forests and Other 

Natural Resources. 

In a short talk at chapel last Friday 
morning Dr. Henry S. Craves, Dean of 
the Yale School of Forestry, whose 
father taught mathematics at M.A.C. 
from 1882 lo 1990, urged that more at- 
tention be paid to the conservation of 
our natural resources, particularly to 
the forests. "We have been accus- 
tomed," he said, "to think of our natu- 
ral resources as unlimited. We nre 
just beginning to realize that they are 
not unlimited." 

To illustrate his point he told two 
stories. In Wisconsin the state form- 
erly owned about fifty thousand acres 
of forest land. Then the legislature 
was persuaded that by holding this 
bind as state property it was preventing 
people from carrying on agricultural 
projects there. Accordingly, the fifty 
t bousand acres were thrown open. 'To- 
day that land is practically worthless ; 
on all of it there are hut 21 families. 

Several years ago there was in south- 
western France a tract of one million 
and a half acres of exceedingly poor 
land. The government look control of 
it and carried on a reforestation project. 
Today, that bind is contributing much 
to agricultural industries. It furnished 
a great deal of limber that was invalu- 
able during the Ureal War. 



DEAN LEWIS AWAY FOR SIX 
MONTHS LEAVE OF ABSENCE 



Plans Include Visits to Large Uni- 
versities of Both America and 
England. 

As much as we appreciate bow de- 
seiving Dean Lewis is of his recently 
granted leave of absence, it is with a 
feeling of sincere regret that we >ee 
him depart from the campus until next 
April. 

The lirsl of this week, Dean Lewis 
left Amherst for Cornell, where he will 
spend the remainder of this month in 
studying and investigating the relation- 
ship of Cornell to other state institu- 
tions, especially in regard to the work 
carried on in agriculture. After com- 
pleting his work at Ithaca, Dean Lewis 
will go to New York City where he can 
study the work being carried out in Ihe 
new department of Agriculture intro- 
duced into Columbia. From Columbia 
he will go to Harvard and spend a few 
days there investigating the study ami 
methods used in the Department of 
Education. 

Hy the middle of November, Dean 
Lewis expects to be well on his way to 
Kurope, and he will be accompanied on 
the trip by Mrs. Lewis and their son 
John. The purpose of the Dean's 
Continued on page 8 



WORCESTER TECH HELD 
SCORELESS BY VARSITY 

23-0 Tally Tells Story of Good Show- 
ing Made Against Worthy 

Opponents. 

The Mass. Aggie gridsters walked 
away with their second consecutive 
victory here last Saturday against the 
Worcester Tech eleven. Captain tiray- 
son contributed eighteen points out ol 
1 be Iweniy-lhree, while the visitors 
tailed to tally. In the third period 
Ontario, Worcester halfback, broke bis 
wrist and was forced to leave ihe game. 

Grayson kicked oil' and Ihe Tech ag- 
gregation bucked Ihe line for two liisl 
downs and made anol her on a penalty: 
but from then on the Maroon had every- 
thing its own way. The White bats, 
who wore the while for t he first time, 
t his season, held Ihe institute pla.Mis 
on downs and forced litem to punt to 

Barrows. Tnmoj rotnrncd the punt at 

once wilh one that far surpassed its 
predecessor in length. Almost at once 
(irayson recovered the ball mi a fumble 
on the :ifj-yard line. An otl-ide penalty 
on Worcesler gave Ihe tioieiles first 
down and they rushed the line for 
another. A f ler i'liot her poaalt] on Ihe 
visitors Grays airied*thc ball over 




Captain "D\mi." Orayoom l!»'23 
M. A. (.'. Bight Halfback 

the line and Heal follower! with a per- 
fect goal. "<'ap"' kicked again and 
Worcester tried lo rush the ball up the 
field but was forced to punt. Again 
Continued on pafn 2 



R. F. MARTIN NEW PRESIDENT 
OF THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

The Roister Doisters have elected for 
the coming year the following oflicers: 
President, Robert F. Marl in 'S-',: \ 
president, H. Karle Weaiherwax '24; 
Manager, Gustaf K. K. Lindskog '2'.',; 
Assistant-manager, Allan Dresser '24. 



tm 



I 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



WORCESTER TECH DEFEATED 

Continued from page 1 

returned end tat ball went over Hie 

visitors' »<>al line. The quarter emleil 
with the ptgtkla ta t he enemy's lerri- 

tnlV. 

The seeond period was charaeteri/eil 
hy the aerial work ol hot h teams. Kaeh 

side groundad three iii tneeetilOB. Tb« 
M. A. ('. aggregation finally resorted to 

line tactics and walked down the liehl 
lor another touchdown l>y (iraysoii, and 

again BeeJ dapllcated with the toe- 
work. The hall seesawed around the 
middle of the gridiron tor a few 

minutes till lieal eau«ht a Worcester 
punt well hack in his territory, which 
he ran hack ahont twenty yards. On 
the next play the lirst completed for- 
ward of the name, Heal to (iraysoii. 
netted Ihe home team ahoul :{") yards 
and once more the quarter ended with 
the visitors' goal in danger. 

Soon after the beginning of the 
second half I lie Aggtt team jol away 
a long punt and Crosby, at end in place 
tit Marshinan, fell on the hall well down 
in Worcester territory when the receiver 

fumbled. (Seal maeoitvered the ball to 

the center of the (ield and tried foi a 
three-point tally l»y (he drop-kick 
method hut Ihe wind carried the ball 
and he missed l>\ inches. The line held 
like that proverbial stone wall and the 
visitors were forced to punt to Ileal. 
M. A. ('. lost the hall on an incompleted 
forward liul Marx recoveied on a 
fumble. ftlcGeoefa not tbrottgb for 
some pretty runs ami Sargent, playing. 

at end for t he lirst lime in bit colleglftte 

career, showed up very well. With the 

ball ob Worcester toil Captain Grayson 

made his thiid touchdown after a long 
end run. lieal kicked the goal. The 
remainder of the period was spent in an 

exchange oi kicks with Tomey holding 
lbs upper hand. Several of his drives 

were of 60 and 00 yards ami all of them 

well-placed. 

In Ihe laatSQUarter the teams seemed 
mors evenly matched and the hall 
stayed in the middle of the lield for 
several minutes. The period was 
shortened live minutes by Ihe mutual 

agreement of tbs captains and coaches 

and it looked as if the final score was to 
be '.21-0. Hut , with more of t he punting 
iMine.t he" A <.'ates"d rove their opponents 
back into t he shadow of their goal posts 
and when they attempted to kick to 
safety Marshniati got tbroOgfa and 
tackled Terry behind his goal for a 
safety, adding two points to the total. 
Also this period was the scene of the 
second and last completed forward. 
Heal threw the hall to the Captain true 
as an arrow for a gain of 88 yards. Also 
Tuiney managed to wrap bis arms 
around one of the visitors' passes and 
hun» on. 

The game showed l lie results of the 
long hard workouts that the men have 
been through and the student body Is 
full of confidence and back of t tie team 
to the linisb. 



Touchdowns- (iraysoii :',. Points on 
try after touchdown, Heal A. (Drop 

kicks). Safety. Perry. Beferee, Young 
of l'ittstield. Umpire, Job neon <>f 
Springfield. Linesman, Peterson of 

Colgate. Time three 18 and one 10 
min. periods. Substitutions: M. A. C 
—Crosby for Marshinan, Abele for 
Myriek, ftfudgetl for Abele. t.leason for 
Sowers, Sargent for Fen ami. Taylor 
for Sargent, Bike for Taylor, Marx (or 
lowers, Giles for Grayson. KeGeoen for 
Barrows, Garretson for Tomey. Wor- 
cester— Johnson for Guthrie. 



THE AMHERST GAME 

Continued from page 1 



they come. The team and the coaches 
are looking for an even break and the 
student body is praying fOI belter. 
The home team will probably line up 

ta follows: Ifarshman, le; Balmoa.lt; 

Myriek, lg; Alger, t\ Sowers, rgi 

Honor, it; Ferraati, re; Heal,, qb; 

Tumey, lhb; (Iraysoii, rhb; Harrows, 
fb. Our representative could, not get 

the lineup oi the Purple warriors hut 
it is expected thai their regular men 

will all play as there are no reports of 
in juries since the Amberst-l'iiion game. 

APPEAL FOR TRACK MEN 



Sum maty: 
Mass, Aooik. 

Maishman, le 
Salman, It 
Myriek, In, c 
Alger, c, re 

Now els, I g 

lfohor, rt 
Perracti, re 

Heal, qb 
Tumey, lhb 
(iraysoii, rhb 
Harrows, fb 

Score by perisds, 
M.iss. aggie, 



WOBCKSTBB TSCH. 

re. Scott 

rt, bice 

ry, Adams 

c, Boberts 

lg, Hansen 

It, Wilcox 

le, Berry 

qb, Latimer 

rhb. Qnthris 

lhb, Morrison 

fb, Perry 

12 3 4 Ttl. 
7 7 7'2 23 



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A wonderful assortment in all the new shades in both plain colors 
and those with contrasting backs. You must see these in order to 
appreciate how much we can save you. Priced as low as $4.00. 

Wearplus Ties, all that the name implies, $1.00 and $1.50 

Now is the time to pick out that Hart SchafTer & Marx Overcoat. 
The assortment is complete and the prices cannot be beaten. 

$30.00 to $50.00 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over Thirty-five Years. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



Present Schedule Gives Five MeetB 
Next Spring. Dashes and Hur- 
dles Especially Weak. 

Men are wauled, and needed, to come 
out lor track. 

A BCCt —either a handicap or an in- 
ler-clasK meet will held the second week 

in November. Track, with lis fourteen 

events, offers an opportunity for every 
one to try out for soinet hint,'. For the 
eontlng •pHOft there is gtenl need of 
dash men, 100 ami 220 yards, (o till the 
hole left by Captain "Jne" Sullivan. 

Though Aeheson wilt be keenly missed 
in the 440. Irish and I'eircewill run this 
year. In the SS0 MacCready and Alger, 

who worked logetbereo well last iprlag 

are on hand. For Hie mile there is 
Captain Roger Friend, whose work in 
this event last season was very valua- 
ble. In the two-mile, Stevenson should 
outdistance most of his opponents. 
Without doubt cross country will briny 
to litfht note capable milers and two- 
niilers. 

Much work must DC done to produce 
men for the high and low hurdles. Sal- 
mon, who has transferred toM.LT., 

was developing into en excellent high- 
hurdler, and "Lev" Woodworth who 
transferred to Cornell Medical School 
was our mainstay in the lows, in the 
jumps new material Is nee. led as barker 
is the only man left. The Broad is a 
little better off as Mac( ready and 
Tumey are still in college. Chase and 
Paddock are left for the pole-vault, and 
it is understood that there are men in 
the entering class with experience in 
this event. 

Little work will be done with the 
shot and discus this fall, as the type of 
men for these events are usually out for 
football. Tumey and Salman of last 
sprinu's team will be on hand for these. 
The javelin is an event, which, though 
comiDg in only one meet last spring, 
nevertheless will be in the New Eng- 
land*, this year. Men must be devel- 
oped for this attractive event. 

A tentative line-up of the schedule is: 

April 28. Amherst at Pratt Field; 

Mayo, Connecticut Auuie at Storrs ; 

May 12, hasternsat Springfield; May 10, 

New Eaglaada; May M, Trtaugular- 

New Hampshire and Vermont at Burl- 
ington. 



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combination when worn with our Profile or Plaid Shirts. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Mock. 

The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes. 



The Comoy Pipe 

We have a large and direct importation of Comoy 
Pifres. The House of Comoy Iprobahly occupies the 
largest Briar pipe factory in the United Kingdom, and 
their tpitpes and other products are known for their 
quality in a land where good tpi^es are common. 

Our stock of the widely-known 
and appreciated Dunhill Pipes is 
the largest and most complete 
ever shown in Amherst. 

The Dunhill pipe needs no introduction to the large 
army of Dunhill smokers. Its cool, sweet smoke is too 
well known. 

We also have Meerschaum Pipes, 
Three B. Pipes in great variety, 
and all Smokers' Needs. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



reshmen : 



In order to have a complete record of the brief years at Aggie, you should start an M-Book at once. Watch it grow 
until it becomes the most highly treasured chapter in the history of your life. We have something new to offer in this 
line— something that you should not fail to see before making a purchase. There's a book for every pocket-book. 



I 



INN 



FRESHMEN BOOKED AGAINST 
FOUR GOOD TEAMS THIS YEAR 



Expected to Make Good Showing at 
Northampton on Friday. 

The Freshman football (earn is work- 
ing overtime this week in preparation 
lor their lirst gaflM of tin- season which 
takes place Friday ot this week wilh 
the last Northampton Blgb team on 
their grounds, The team proved ihem- 

■elvea superior to the Amherst nigh 
School team in their recent gaOBfl, ami 

u is estimated thai they oatwelgh the 

Flush hy several pounds to the man. 

Coach Collins has been hiisy the past 
two weeks perfecting an aerial game 
which he feels sure will more than off- 
let the weight handicap of the oppon- 
ents. The (-rudeness of t he olTen.sc was 
notireahle the past week and much 
time has heen spent in bolldtag up this 
mportant factor ot the game. 

The probable line-up for the Friday 
^aine as jjiven out hy Coach Collins is: 
liowers and Sliedd, c: McKay ami 
.loiies, t ;Thurlow, Nairn and Qavta, g; 
Coahlg.e; Uuckley, qb; Grayeoe, lhb; 

Gnstafaoa, rbb; and Anthony or White, 

111. 

The schedule has been completed and 
i> as follows: Oct. 2(1, Northampton 
High ai Northampton; Oct. M, Rosary 

HiKh at Holyoke: Nov. :{, Deeilield 
\cademy at Deerlield; Nov. 11, Willis- 
toii Seminary at Rastbamptoa. 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM TO RUN 
IN AT LEAST THREE MEETS 



Team of 17 Had First Trials Sat- 
urday. 

There are 17 men out for cross- 
'"untry and in their lirst trials .Satur- 
day they showed up well. Stevenson, 
one of (he mainstays of the squad, is 
running very well this fall, and bide 
(air to equal or break (be record hunt; 
up by George L. Slate, '21, two years 
Included in the list are: Tanner. 
Newell, Tisdaie, MacCready, Hallett, 
Hates, and Gordon, all '2H; Stevenson, 
Hill, Gifford, Isaac, Lamb and taring 
li nil "24: and Hurhoe from '2o. The 
schedule is: — 

Sot, 4, Worcester Tecb at Worcester. 
5»OV. 11, New Knylamls at Boston. 
Sot. 17, Amherst on the Amherst Long 
Oreen Course. 

It is hoped that it will be possible to 
I n<{e a run for tbe 2Mtb of this month. 



FOUR FRESHMEN HIT THE MUD 
TO APPEASE REVENGE OF '25 

Varied Program Includes Near De- 
struction of Sophomores' Plat- 
form and Morale. 

The pond-party season was officially 
opeasd last Friday noon, when the 

merabere of tbe sophomore olaea pre- 
sented a veil-balanced act, with foor 
deatbly-frlgbtened rYoefa making up 

the east and wilh a broken platform on 
the hank of the pond fee a Stage, The 

cast ot character! was propelled to ihe 

pond on hands and knees to 1 be I line ol 

three-quarter inch boards ably applied, 

Wilh Ihe arrival ol the parade at the 
reviewing stand tire lirst number was a 
picture of the participants. Then it 
was a liyht to see bow many could 
crowd on to the none too strongly built 
platform, creeled by the French Alchi- 

icct George Bealeaa. As ■ result of 

the mad rush to tbe catapulting plat- 
form one of the main joisis was not 
aide to keep the Mini ol the forces in 

static equilibrium equal to sero,sol( 

calmly broke. Fortunately m> one was 
thrown off , but it served to clear the 

platform from Ibea on. The ire! man 

l<> secure samples of ihe water for 
chemical analysis was (.rant. The 
water dampened his spirits, hut also 
served to resuscitate him from his 
frightened condition ami ii is said Ileal 
he will probablj recover. 

(Jrant was followed by Nichols, who 
showed a ureal willingness to do as hid. 
and as a result was not hurled in quite 
so hard. Nnylcr. tbe next to whirl 
tbrottgb space, was no I so inclined to 
sin» and cheer; but a few well applied 
taps of the paddle warmed him up to 
his work and he really seemed to enjoy 
i he water. 

The last act on the program was fur- 
nished by Belmore, who did his piece 

very well. He was thrown t he larthest 
and the hardest, but he did not go In 
unaccompanied. The hat of Stage- 
master Love also look a iterillsleg, and 
was retrieved :»t the expense ot a 
wetting. 



A Pair of 



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Imported Tan Scotch Grain 
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To the flayer, cither M. A. C. or Amlicrst. 
making the lirst touchdown in t lie M. A. C- 
Amlierst game. SATURDAY. Oct. 21. 



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PROF. OSTRANDER IN COURT 

Prof. J. B, Osiiander. meteorologist 
of the Experiment Station sad head of 

the Mathematics Department was re- 
cently asked to testify in a Springfield 
court concern! n| the weather on the 
morning of .Ian. :!<> or 31 in order lo 
prove whet her previous evidence ^i veil 
in t he court was truthful. 



ITS A HAPPY PEELING, ISN'T IT 

To know that your shoes have been 
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We depend upon satisfied cus- 
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The work is done by the Goodyear 
Welt Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRAND0NIC0, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - Mass. 



The Colonial Inn 

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October the 14th is Candy Week 

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COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOAUD OF EDITORS. 



UYIM f.lUNll EdUor-ln-Chlei 

I., mm »• Arr.naton '28 Managing Editor 

ASBOOIATK EDITOKS. 
,e» ii. IUA..-24 Ass't Man's Editor 

AI.HEKI K. Wacom 'M Athletic Editor 

gOI.OMOV < <>ll IS V 

JOHN M. WHITT1F.U '23 

I,. I-KANOIS KKNNKI.V '24 

Kuril M. VV(mh> '24 

Uwu ll. Kkhii '25 

ClIAUI.KS K. IM.IMU. •!»• "#> 



Business Department. 

Owkn K. Foliom '23 BuslneM Manager 

ROSBM K. SiFKKK '24 Advertl.ins Manager 

QUWWOUt I.. B»U>«« "»l Circulation Manager 

DOHAU) W. I.kwib'26 



mysteriously and other teams have 
found them helpful. This has not been 
due to underhandedness on the part of 
the student body, but almost entirely 
by carelessness. When fellows are 
coming out of the movies or when they 
are home over vacation they get talk- 
inn about the team and let slip remarks 
that are better kept quiet. One will 
say "Didn't the ougbty-ought play go 
good this afternoon "'"and entirely aside 
from his mistakes in English he is let- 
ting slip the fact that we have an 
ougbty-ought play that night amount 
(0 something. Or one will say, "Didn't 
Jones go well on that off-tackle play 
this morning?" and some eavesdropper 
will immediately discover that we have 
a man named Jones who is good in off- 
tackle plays. He will write to Coach 

Smith of University and 

say, " I happened to find out today 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

■ntered a» Mcond-claia matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Autism for mailing at epectal 
rate of postage provided for In section 110.1. Act 
of October. 1911 authorized August 20. 1W8. 



A World Aggie Night. 
World Aggie Night is beginning to sig- 
nify something to the alumni. Kaeh 
year the alumni gathering in the various 
towns and cities of the United States 
Bad other places, such as PortO Kico, 
Cub*, Hawaii, and Mexico, creates a 
great deal of enthusiasm for the college 
and its work. Alumni look forward to 
the event and make it a point to travel 
long distunes that they may attend 
the reunion. 

From the lirst the idea was received 
with pleasure ,<>n the closing dale of the 
Memorial Hali Campaign Fund. The 
initial success showed the possibility 
of continuing the custom year after 
year. Three World Aggie Nights have 
only added to the satisfaction derived 
from the lirst meeting, and each year 
the moveine.it gains impetus and 
greater acceleration. 

Qood fellowship. Aggie geniality, col- 
lege pep, and an all-round good time 
are features which can be withstood by- 
few men. and these are just the char- 
acteristics of a World Aggie Night. . 

Is it not peculiar, however, that the 
students of the institution fox which all 
this loyalty is professed, the students, 
who are the very life of the college 
scarcely take any note of the occasion, 
scarcely hear of it in fact f While the 
alumni are making merry .feasting, ban- 
queting, the student body turns to its 
accustomed tasks of a Saturday night, 
"fussing,'* movies, novel perusing etc. 
Why should not the whole Aggie broth- 
erhood participate equally In the fes- 
tivities? College is the place lo plant 
the seeds of a World Aggie Night. 



that the Mass. Aggies are using Jones 
in an off-tackle play," and coach Smith 
will tell bis men to be on the lookout 
for just what we may be planning to 
use. The coaches are trying to guard 
against too much familiarity with 
minor details which the onlooker does 
not need and which he cannot use. It 
is not that they distrust the student 
body but they are taking no chances 
in a season that has started out as well 
as this one. 

Another thing is the fact that, if the 
student body is admitted, there is 
nothing to keep outsiders out. Willi 
the large Freshman four year and two 
year classes there is no one in college 
who can tell whether or not any one 
man is a member of the student body 
or an alien. For example, the other 
day there was a practice to which the 
student body was admitted. In the 
crowd, all unknown to Hie students, 
was a former lackle of a rival team. 
For about ten minutes he looked o\er 
the team before he was discovered by 
someone who happened to know him. 
Without a doubt he wrote to his coach 
and said, "I just happened to be pass- 
ing the Mass, Aggie gridiron the other 
day and dropped in to look things over. 
They are using such- and- such forma- 
tions and so- and- so looks especially 
good.' - This is another thing that the 
coaches are guarding against. 

It is for the good of the team, and 
therefore for the good of the college, 
that the secret practices have been in- 
stitutod. It is our duty to back up the 
rules and see to it that they are en- 
forced. 



him through college is not allowed to 
add to his store of earnings in the or- 
dinary way, but must eat into his little 
pile more and more until alter four 
years' study he is ready to embark up- 
on the sea of life with a clear con- 
science, an abundance of book know- 
ledge, some experience, and an empty 
pocketbook. On the other hand, the 
carefree lad who knocked at the doors 
Of his Alma Mater empty handed, 
either by thriftlesslness or misfortune, is 

given every opportunity to work his 
way through college, with certain re- 
strictions of course. In the case of the 
unfortunate youth the system is per- 
fectly justifiable; in the case of the 
thriftless youth the system is abomin- 
able. If every one were given equal 
chance, who would have all the jobs ou 
the campus— the man who had saved 
up enough to goto college or the other 
group? It is certain that both groups 
leave college in the same linancial 
position. 

Certain restrictions were mentioned 
in connection with the second group. 
Peculiarly enough these restrictions 
are the cause of great antipathy toward 
the private benefactors of the students. 
After a student has diligently proved 
bis condition to be such that work is 
necessary in order to continue bis col- 
lege career, the trouble is bat half 
over. A petition for a job in the Dining 
Hall oftentimes leads to the janitor- 
ship of Memorial Hall, and vice versa, 
an expression of a desire to take care of 
the Memorial Hall ends up in a waiter's 
coat and apron. As far as possible, 
why not satisfy the requests of aspi< 
rants to prevent general dissatisfaction ? 
Several instances of the above type have 
been noted this year 

Petitioners are often held needlessly 
in suspense for weeks, first encouraged, 
then asked to wait without a definite 
answer time after time. Irritation of 
this sort leads to a seini-Bolsuevistic 
frame of mind. Greater speed, accu- 
racy, and efficiency would straighten 
tilings out and set tbem on the best 
possible basis consistent with the sys- 



Town Hall, Amherst 

bjh ■ Asset Ayrei. JscK Molt ami 

Thursday Walter Him in -Bought 

and Paid For." from the 

— famous play bf Q«o. Brosd- 

tmrst. a rrest stats tilt 

Mat. 3, Kve. made into a greater picture. 
6-45. 8-30 News Comedy 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



tielene ChadwicK ami Rich 
ard Dii in "The Glorioua 
Fool." from the story 1» 
Mary Roberta Kineliart. A 
1 Blde-siiUtting, sure-tire lilt. 
Sso.t Review." Winter Pep" 
Butter Keatun in"TheCop«" 



~ . Mabel Normand in "Mead 

SatlirdaV Over Heeli." Mabel nlava a 
wild little scrotal from Italy 
in Hits comedy of liroadway 

1,fe - - w » 

Pathe Newt 

| reel Sunshine Comedy 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



. • 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve 
6-45 8-30 



Wallace Re id. Theodore 
Roberts and Mary MacLarea 
in "Acrois the Continent. 

Sec Wallie IIIISSll 1 1 1 *- COSSt 
to coast antO record: Drive 
his car through a niglng 
prairie lire! Ilace deuth and 
the< iv. Miami Express threats 
a pitch-Mack tunnel. 
Screen Snapshots 
•.'-reel Century Comedy 



College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 



Hair Bobbing 

Facial Massage 

Head Treatment 



II. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 
Eevrything All "Write" Here 



teni in vogue. 



Secret Practice. 
We have noticed an undercurrent of 
dissatisfaction In the student body the 
last few weeks on the subject of secret 
practice for the football team. Some 
of the men think tbey are being 
"g.VFP eti " oUt of 8ometuin K because 
(hey can not watch the team in action. 
The Physical Education Department 
has a met hod in its madness, however. 
The last few years the best plays that 
the team has had have leaked out 



Employment. 
•'Work, work and work some more." 
Only too well do a large number of 
M. A. C. students realize the full sig- 
nificance of Prof. Hasbrouck's advice, 
perhaps not altogether in the way it 
was intended to be given, but primarily 
so at least. Perhaps the work with 
the brain was included, perhaps the 
work of the kinaesthetic senses com- 
prised the greater half; yet one thing is 
certain, lo gain employment at college 
no large amount of mental labor is 
necessary. 

In the good old days of Adam Smith 
in order to gain a livelihood it was im- 
perative to combine brain and brawn if 
one wished to rise in the world. Each 
person was dependent on bis own 
peculiarities, or may be resources, for 
sustenance. The poor man was at the 
bottom because he did not have the 
ambition to climb up, and furthermore 
if he did have a spark of ambition, no- 
body stood nearby and tried to fan it 
for him. 

How different today. The man who 
has saved up carefully enough to put 



COMMUNICATION 
To riiK Editor or tuk Coixaena: 

Like most readers of its Coi.i.koian. 
I have to depend upon the reports for 
accounts of athletic contests played 
away from Amherst. By discounting 
the reports about 35 per cent and using 
my imagination to picture the play of 
the opposing team. I generally manage 
to piece out the game and sometimes to 
account for the score if it happens to be 
against us. Lately it has been increas- 
ingly difficult to do so. Last season, 
had not the coach told me he had a 
losing team, I shouldn't have known it 
from the Coi.i.kgian until the consola- 
tion expressed after the Tufts game in- 
dicated that all had not been glorious 
victory before that redeemiug day. 
This fall the Com.kc.ian is not handi- 
capped by any absurd patriotism that 
calls foT the shielding fo a losing team. 
Can't we, then, look for impartial and 
honest reports of games? 

The Connecticut game was a real 
battle, from all accounts of eye wit- 
nesses. But in reporting the game the 
Collegian failed to display the same 
sportsmanship demanded of all Aggie 
teams. How long since we have felt 
obliged lo account for the lone tally of 
a worthy opponent as "some freak of 
fate'".' How long since all the agility 
and knowledge of the game reposed in 
our team? In the days when we an- 
nually sent a hopeful eleven to defeat 
against Dartmouth what a wail would 




no matter what you want to write on 01 
about. For the home, the office, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Pens. 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc 
Every article is warranted, and oni 
prices are as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

How to aet acquainted— 

Attend a cluli night dance. 

Every other Wednesday, starting Oct. 25th 

Enjoyable evening spent with con- 
genial young people guaranteed. 

Every FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Beginning Sept. 29th. 

Popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 7(>1 Northanipt- 



T. S. PEKINS 

Salts made to order - $35.00 to S45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suits Pressed r-0c Military Tail«>ii; 




HICKEY-FRKKMAN TUXEDOS 

£TTKICTL.Y conservative, uh the finest dress garment* nlwnys are! Whut i\ man gets in a 
^" Hiekey-Freeinan Tuxedo is the finest hand-tailoring that money ran emimiaiid needle- 
work as delicately done as an etching, the dignity and inspiration of grrat workmanship ! 
We're not given to superlatives, lml again pronounce these snpeih llt( M VI HI I M \.\ 
productions: The Finest Tuxedos Made. Prices lower than you suspect. 

Let "TOM" show them to you to-day. 



have (jo ne up from the Coi.i kgian ;i! 
any such ■lighting story of the (jame 
from Hanover as your account of the 
Connecticut game! 

In the second half the Cosneellent 
leatn inarches down t he field and scores 
on a forward pass from the 16-yard line. 
But what a grudging account of it: 
"It looked for a time as though weight 
would tell Strains! ability and knowl- 
edge of the l;;i me .... Finally 
. . . . they managed to get the 
ball on our 15-yard line. The Connect- 
icut quarterback called for a forwaid 
pass. Instead of going forward it went 
almost straight up. and by some freak 
of fate it landed safely in the arms of a 
Connecticut player who was just cross- 
ing the goal line." 

The pass, then, must have gone for- 
ward at least 20 yards, which seems lo 
have been far enough. And if it was a 
weird throw, was there no agility dis- 
played in catching it? But suppose 
luck, which is a factor in all games, did 
play a pari, does the Coi.i.kgian ever 
record its assistance to an Aggie team.' 
Why slur the enemy so".' Why tind 
amusement in bis ambition to win, 
with one of bis strongest learns, against 
an enemy be has yel to defeat.' We 
have been in the same position, and 
our futile efforts have won praise from 
more couricous opponents than we 
prove ourselves. 

Now the year is just starting. Can't 
you Coi.i.kgian fellows draw up a jour- 
nalistic Magna Cbarla, declare your in- 
dependence of this patriotic buncombe 
thai demands puffs instead of fair re- 
ports, and give us the story as it hap- 
pened ? If you must sometimes depend 
on the account of the football manager 
or a similarly biased obsetver, doesn't 
decency dictate scrupulous ciliiing of 
his report - .' I'll guarantee the 
athlete would respect you more for 
it. And at any rate the essential thing 
is that we in the college and those out- 
side for whom the Coi.i.kgian is pub- 
lished should be able to feel confidence 
in the fairness of its news column. 

L. M. Lyons IK. 



To thk Editor of tiik Coi.i.kgian: 

One of l he classes at If. A. C. has 
now the system of forming the class 
nominating committee by having each 
fraternity elect one member. No sys- 
tem more vicious could be devised. 
Whatever the theoretical good, the re- 
sults are bad. 

The lirst effect is to make each fra- 
ternity a political unit. As soon as the 
class allows fraternity representation 
on its committees, so soon do the fra- 
ternities assume political power. 

A second effect is bad politics. The 
system causes political bargaining of a 
vicious sort. It has twice come to the 
notice of the writer that members of 
me fraternity have approached mem- 
bers of another fraternity with a definite 
tier of votes in exchange for votes for 
ne of its own men. There was no con- 
deration of the fitness for the otlice 
I the candidates or for their deserving 



of the otlice. It was simply a "You 
vote for me, and I'll vole for you" prop. 
osilion. 

A third effect is interfraternal Strife. 
The fraternities become out-and-out 
competitors in the field. A candidate 
'i reives no voles from one group of 
men on the sole fioasdi that he is a 
member of a certain fraternity. Fra- 
ternal groups are likely to indulge in 
"clipping tiom behind". 

A fourth effect is the loss ofeJaSI 
unity, morale, and spirit. Insiead of 
having a class meet ;is ■ group with the 
progress of the class in view, a das* 
meedug becomes a political camp 
divided into fraternal factions, each 
seeking|(o place itsown men in position. 
The class itself is lost sight of, and 
there is no incentive to try to place the 
right men in the right position. 

I>o we want fraternities to become 
poll t leal units, do we want selfish class 
politics, interfraternal strife, and dis- 
integrated classes.' Do we want our 
(lass officers to be fit for the oflice or do 
we want them to be fraternity repre- 
sentatives? Do we want sly politics of 
open-handed dealings ".' 

The remedy".' Fleet a nominating 
committee from the class of men who 
are honest men, who can show good 
judgment. The class of IfJH has its 
present class olliceis constitute a nomi- 
nating committee for the next election. 
The system works nicely. It is not rec- 
ommended as ideal, but simply lo 
show that there are practical systems 
which give good results. 

The system ot having one member of 
the inmi'iiating committee from each 
fraternity takes I he emphasis of unity 
off Ihe elaai and places itotithelra- 
lerniiy where it does not belong, ll 
places a value on political bargaining. 
It disintegrates the class. Its evil is 
inlinilely greater than any supposed 
good. It should be abolished. 

This is in no way intended to discredit 
the fraternities. The writer is a fra- 
ternity man and a firm believer in fra- 
ternities. 

k. B. hn»D, IMS. 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

Theta (hi will hold "open house" on 
Friday Oct. 20 from \\ to 10-IK), v. m. 



Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

Cigars and Cigarettes— Special pi ire per carton 
on < igarettett. 

Schrallt's Chocolates and other h-mling lines. 
Cracker* and Canned Good* 

Cboitipson's Omclp Calks 

foine in and hear some of the latisl liitis by 
Kddie (antor and A! .lolgon. latest Fox Trots 
by Ted Lewis' Bead and Hay Miller's Orchestra. 



M. A. C. ENTERTAINS 65 OF 

HOME ECONOMICS ASS'N 

The New Fngland branch of the 

Ilium Kcaoraloa Association of America 

chose M. V. ('. as Ihe place <>l their 
first outside-ot BoStOS meeting this 
year, and last Saturday ti.'i officials and 
members toured the Aggie campus and 
lunched at Draper Hall. 

Miss Antoinette Knot, who lias ehaige 
of Ihe teacher's training department in 
the Home Economics oouree at Blmmons 

College, was the principal speaker at 
the discussion in Memorial Hall alter 
luncheon. 

The I heme of this meeting was "The 
Contribution of Fcoiiomics to Hon.e 
Economies." In past years the differ- 
ent phases of the subject of home 
building have been discussed, but Ihe 
present idea is lo teach something of 
ihe reasons for the prices of food si tills ; 
when to buy and where; wb\ certain 
markets are better than others, and. 
in general, more of tin* outside world's 
connect ion with home life. 

President Buttci field spoke on Ihe 
"Contribution of .Sociology (o Home 
Fcoiiomics" and Miss Jefferson OB the 
theme for the year. 

The Extension sad Home Boonomiea 

Department members of ihe Association 
and the Board here on the campus had 
charge of the arrangements for Hu- 
mecting, and offered its eiilcrtainmeiil 
the lour of ihe campus and a demon- 
stration by Prof Thayer on "Flower \i 
rangenients." 



MT. H0LY0KE AFFORDS GOOD 
OUTING FOR COLUMBUS DAY 



DAIRY PRODUCTS TEAM MAKES 
FINE SHOWING AT ST. PAUL 



Team Places Second, with Brewer as 
High Man in Milk Judjiug. 

Details of the placing of our team at 
the National Dairy Show at .St. Paul 
last week showed that the Dairy 
Products Team, consist tug of Brewer, 

Beat b and Goldstein, took second place. 
The first four of the nine teams compet- 
ing were as follows : 

1st Ohio 

2nd M. A. C. 

:$rd Iowa 

4th Nebraska 

M. A. C. was the only Fasten) Team 
entered, and made a very creditable 



Students and Faculty, with Profs. 
Gordon and Osmun, Have Educa- 
tional Trip. 

Pro fe s sor "Doe" Gordon proved him- 
self to be an admirable guide and prac- 
tical geologist on Columbus Day, when 
he engineered a hike foi students and 
faculty to Ml. Holyoke. About W men 
left the car al South lladley and 
headed for the mountain house over 
i lie mad. (In ihe way various stops 

wire made, to see just how I he i in- 

tain came there, a short while ago "geo- 
logically speaking". 

Shortly after noon the party 
scaled the south slope, (where I hey met 
Profe ss o r Oamaa with another parly) 
and were soon ealing lunch in the lee 
of Hie tiptop house, with Ihe broad 
Connecticut in full view below. This 
grand View Of IBS river, from Ml. Tom 
ou the south to Ml. Toby on Hie noiih, 

afforded the professor ample ebanosto 

tell a short story of the whys and 
Wherefores Of lbs formation of the 
whole valley. 

After availing Ho msclves of Hie tel- 
escopes and other facilities of the 
mountain house, I he men turned their 
laces toward Ihe north and the village 
Of lladley. and made the descent in 
record tunc. After hunting for and 
lindiiig many fossils in t he clay deposits 
on the banks of the river, they returned 
to Aiiihcrsl, voting the day a complete 
success 



GRADUATE CLUB ELECTS 

DAVID POTTER PRESIDENT 



Thirteen New Graduate Students 
at College This Fall. 
At a meeting of the Graduate dab 

held Wednesday, Oct. 1, in the Micro- 
biology BoUdlng, the following oflosfl 
were elected : President, David Potter; 
vice-president , Fleanor Chase ; secretary 
and treasurer, Mary Gervejr; chairman 

oi the Program Committee, Boy c. 

Avery ;chairinan of the social coininillee 
J. Kaymond Sanborn. 

The following new students have 
enrolled in the Graduate School this 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 

"BIDE-yVWEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good thing* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 416-W; lladley. Mast 



showing. In addition to the team plac- fall: 

ing, Brewer was high man in individual Herman II. Krase. New York University 

milk judging, so that two cups will be Stanley \V. lironiley, M. A. 0. '22. 

brought home, this latter one and the Chung-ting Chao, University of Nan- 
team's for second jdace. king. 

The Fat Stock Judging Team, with Fleanor F. Chase, M. A. C. '22. 

Brewer, Heath and Ifudgett, placed Nathan I. Fpstein, M. I. I 

fifth, with honors in Jersey class judg- Oliver S. Flint, M. A. C. ]8. 

ing where they placed second. Merwin I'. Ball, Amherst College. 

The team placed lifth in total Mores, Julia P, Hodgdon, Smith College. 

and Brewer placed sixth with his indi- John F. Johnson, North Carolina 
Vidua! score. State College. 

The M. A, C. teams placed fifth in Kaymond A . Mooney . M. A . C TH. 

Hie general score, and of the twenty Grant B. Snyder, Ontario Agricultural 
teams the first five placed as follows: College. 

North Dakota, Oregon, Iowa, Purdue Charles Raymond Vinton, M. A. 0, '22. 

and M. A. C. Marion Wetherell, Vassal College. 



OVER ADAMS' DRl'« STORE 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1»22. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



M. A. C. GRADUATE GIVES 
HARVARD CREW A POINTER 

The Harvard rowing 8WW OOWehes 
h ivc adopted for training' purposes the 
rooking seat invented l>y l>r. Joel E. 
GoldtOWSllS 'M of Hie t r "i:in Bofti Club 
Of Boston, hi place of the Sliding seat 
formerly used, it was announced re- 
cently by Boberl Btrrlek, cbatanaa of 

the lowing committee. The new seat, 
which is designed to train oarsmen to 
keep their hacks erect in practice, has 
been lilted to an einhl-oar shell and 
given a success! ul trial on I lie Charles 
river. 



SHORT COURSE. 



Capt. Bangs Only Scorer Against 
Springfield Frosh. 



COMMISSION MAY HAVE GREAT 
INFLUENCE ON FUTURE OFM.A.C. 



S. S. HYDE 

a Pleasant Htreet (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

I-.il; Hen Alarm! !<>< Us :tnd other Keluible MukeH 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Ke:in<m:il)lc Trices. 
Informal* a Specialty 

IS BO, I'rospeetSt.. Amherst. USSI 

Tml. BBB-M 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

It Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Fine Groceries 
Candies ano Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



You can save from 



$3.00 to $5.00 a paii 

— on — 

Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



Although Hie Two Veai football team 
showe.l ;i depHted improvement over last 
week the Springfield freshmen easily 
disposed of them bj a 22 to 8 score last 
Saturday. One ol I he hriyht lights OJ 
the name was the work of Shaw, the 
Springfield left end. He kicked three 
drop-kicks from the 35, 40 and 4.". yard 
lines respectively and did most of their 

pnntlng< 

Springfield started off In the tirsl per- 
iod of the geSDS when Shaw dropped 
over two lield coals in succession. Aggie 
came hack like a whirlwind and Captain 
BengS broke thronga IbC middle Of the 
line ami sprinted 4(1 yards for a touch- 
down. 

The boms team started out to clean 
up in the second period ami made their 
liisl touchdown after recovering a punt 
that had been blocked by one of Aggie's 
own men. Shaw scored his third kick 
at Ike beginning of the second half and 

in (he final quarter Sehnaldl picked np 

I punt that Harnacle had fumbled ami 
raced 40 yards for their final score. 

Captain Bangs was easily the heel 

player of the Two Year team, while 
Shaw surpassed anybody else that was 
on the field. The line-up: 
Sim:i\<.hki.i> r'i:<»n. 
Shaw, ie 
Matthias, It 

German, (Capt.) Ig 

Elliot, c 

Demurest, Davidson, Ig, 

Bond, Wilxin, rt 

Canal, Brooks, Detrieh, re 

le, Peiroe, Croeroa 

Perschke, qb «|b, Bancs, Uarnaclc 

BoTsoa, Bebnaldt, Ihh "lib, Trull 

Kitchuey, rhb Ihb, Henry 

Noflle,fb fb. Hisbce 

Touchdowns — llancs,Schnaidl, Noftle. 
( ioals from t he lield-Shaw 3. Ueferee— 
Uoemo. Umpire— llerron. 



Says Prexy, in Telling of Possibili- 
ties of New Governor's Commission. 



At chapel Monday mornlng.Freslo'en! 

llutterlieldsaid/'Uneoi thethincswhich 
we must take into account in connec- 
tion with out v-atchword for the year, 
"The Forward Look. "is t heiuvesi Ration 
commission appointed by the (iovcrnor 
tliis summer to study the nee ds of 
higher education in Massachusetts. 
Upon its report the future of M. A. C. 
rests to a iargS decree. Them are now 
in this state 17 OOllegee, 11 normal 
schools and three textile schools. 
Many of these institutions have been 
obliged to torn away Students. Then- 
are many possibilities as to the report 
of the commission. It may advise the 
Legislature to found a state university, 
either in connection with M. A. C. or 
entirely separate; it may advise that 
some of the normal or textile schools 
be made into colleges, or it may propose 

an altogether or different plan." 



THE BEST IN 

Drug Store Merchandise 
HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Hexall Store 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



Two Vk. \k. 

re, Brings 

rl, 1'oiler 

r«, Hastings 

e. Outhouse 

Ig, Bllgh 

It, Adams 



CHEMICAL ASSOCIATION 

MEETING HERE SATURDAY 



28 MEN MAKE CREDITABLE 
SHOWING FOR AGGIE BAND 



THE 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



The M. A. C band was organised for 
the year last Thursday morning, Oct. 
12 under the leadership of Bobert D. 
Fuller '23. The following men are in 

t he organisation : 

Cornets— B. tfoyes, G. 8. Aldrieb.S. 
Burboe, G. D. fcfeserve, T. Henneberry, 

K. W. Medlennen. and .1. It. Williams. 

Saxophones— U. 11. Woodworth, S. 
Anthony, l\ ('. Fairbanks, b; Wheeler, 
ami ('. Johnson. 

Trombones- 1.. F. Kennedy, A. \Y. 
Ames, 11. Fraser, I!. Bnckhoet, F. 

Caless. 
Drums— W. D. Rhodes, C. Grant, B, 

Ilermance and 11. Stopford. 
oboes- D. Homer and F. Maxson. 
Horns -U. Bates and E. L. DonglaSO. 

Clarinet— J. Temple. 
Flute— Ci. Perry. 

Cymbals— O. Stone. 

The band rehearses every Wednesday 

evening in the Social Union rooms, 

North College, Director Fuller expels 
to have his men all "tuned" up for the 
Amherst came next Saturday. 



Banquet and Speeches at Draper 

Hall. Five Colleges Represented. 

A meetinc of (he Connecticut Valley 

Section of the American Chemical So- 

eiely, of which Dr. J, B. Chamberlain 

is president and Prof. Paul Berex, sec- 
retary, van held here last Sat imtay. The 
members of the society attended the 
football game la the afternoon and 
afterward a banquet at Diaper Hall. 

During the-baaquet, President Butter- 
field and Dr. .1. B. Lindsey spoke. 
Nominations were made for candidates 

from t hie section for office in the Nat- 
ional Society. 

At 7-45, at the Meinoral Building, 

Dr. J. G. JJpsnan, Director of the Hen 
Jersey Kxpeilmeni station, gave an ad- 
dress on the future use of nitrogen. 
About IH) members of {the society were 

present at the meetinc. among them 
were representative* of five eollegee— 

Amherst, Smith, Trinity, Wesleyan, and 
M. A. C. 



Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 

The Store of Quality and Service 

invites VOW attention 

t.> .mi line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We caliv 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 



IN — 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Amateur Dmvmloplng and Printing 

Hills Studio— Phone 456-R 



INDEX NOTICE 



THREE HOUSE DANCES HELD 
IN PLACE OF INFORMAL 

The informal that didn't materialise 

famished material for three fraternity 

house dances last Saturday afternoon 
and evening. 

Alpha Sigma Phi, held the first 
dance in three years, and sixteen 
couples danced from toiir-thirly until 
nine. Supper was served by Bias, ami 
the fraternity orchestra furnished 
music. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, with the Dunbar- 

Woodworth combination, had a dance 
attended by fifteen couples. The notes 
of "DiddleV marimba were appre- 
ciated bot h !\v t he dancers and by an 
interested croup of "stags" outside. 
Alpha Gamma Bho ran an evening 

dance only, from 7-80 until 10-00. 
Punch and cake were served to the 
fifteen couples attending, and a town 
orchestra was obtained to furnish 



Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prompljr dene. 

Work called for and delivered. 

Saw money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



The following pictures for the MWH 

In<li:r will be taken at Mills' Studio, 
next Sunday morning, Oct. 22: 

10-00 a. St.* Senate 

1(11.-, " -Adelphia 

10-80 " — inlerfraternily Conference 

io-4'i " Kappa Epsllon 



After Every 
Meal 






music for dancim 



Instead of the social scheduled for 

Wednesday evening at Grace Church, 

Mr. Parke and Mr. Ward are inviting 
those who are confirmed to Ibe Holy 
Communion at 7-45, and all Episcopal 

students to ft bieaklast at B-80, in Grace 
House, on Sunday. Oct. 89. 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

FRESHMEN— Why not let a $1.25 Rubber Chemistry Apron save a fifty dollar suit? 



THREE DAY FLOWER SHOW 
TO COME NOV. 10, 11, AND 12 

November 10, 11, and IS, Friday 

nicht, Saturday, and Sunday, will be 

red-letter days for t he Kloiiciilt uie I »«• 

partment of i he College. They are 

plsnntng to hold an up-to-daic Bower 
Show in French Hall on tBSM dates, 

which it is hoped «iii equal or eclipse 

the line shows which were held here 
several years ago. 

Members of the Northampton and 
Holyoks Florists' and Gardem is' Club 

will also he on hand with some exhibits 

to augsseat those of the college. The 

students will have a large part in ar- 

raagiag the decorations : ,nd exhibits 
for ihis show, watch will girt people ■ 
good chance to see just what the col- 
lege is doing in this line of work. 



RESOLUTIONS 

\\ liiri'n.s il has pleased <o>«l in Ins in- 
linite wisdom to rOBSOVS from OOI earth- 
ly sicht our beloved bioilur Kiwin 
.lar.line Hock, be il 

Besefeed, thai am of ike Make Gem- 
ma lti«i) Fraternity, do express our 

deepest regit I at the 

teeased brother, and do herebj extend 
our nincere and heartfelt sympathy 

to hiH family in this, tkeli daj el sor- 
row ; also, be It lurt her 

Reeeteed, thai a copy of these reso- 
lutions I.,- si ut to hie family; tkai « 

copy be SeWI to the M ■ 

legesm, and tea on ih, 

pcimanchi record* of the Fraterni' 

i.i i hi i. i; \ aaixofwv, 

Boat 'in B • . i 

Rl< ii \ i.i. r \i *\ i i i . 

For the Fralen 



NOTICE 

Dr. Heeley will uive hie annual •• | 
of lectures on Hyciene to tin I i. -Inaen 
and student l.o.lv on Die fallowing 
dates : » »« i . 24. tfk M . KoV. l,~ 



'88.— Cnrey In leewled in tlie city 
department of eagfaeeriag in >pnnu- 
liebl. 



DR. JAMES B, PAIGE 

Contlnned from p»gn 1 

Work wit h little a|iparei|t effort. 

Hut he was most skill,.,) j„ | lis ,|,. a |. 
IngS with men. He wasame.it teacher, 

not alone by his ikoroogfa knowledge 
and his ability to Imparl it tootbera. 

lie taught men how to live. One of 

nts favorite expressions was: "There i- 

a principle involve. I. •• \v| lt .„ ,,,,,,. |, ( . 

discovered the principle by which he 
should be guided, nothing could divert 

him from his course ,,( action II,- 

walked uprightly. Such virtuee bet - 

reyed to his students. | Ms judgment 

ot human nature IS S UM J almost infalli- 
ble. When he was SCTVini as Dean of 

,l "' , '" 11, ■ i Senior who the previous 
term had failed in nlmoei gj peroeni of 

his eours, •.. came to t he ll \) t( . l . u , nrrangc 
bis schedule. When hastepped to the 

d.'sk the Dean handed him a .aid which 

, "' k ""■" ■> Ma. Thestudaul found 

written on it Sestet blag liketliis: "Con- 
dition exam, in OaWtae a, must be 
Hid Oct. Hi; Oettoitlea exam, iii 

t'ouise it, must ha pwaagd Oct. 24. No 

cuts allowed from aWj v. Iiedllled . 

laalwdlBg chapel. Incase of any 

sfriagasaeal ..1 tkeakove,you will with- 
draw troea eollei The boy was start- 
led, in- leit how.vet nrlth a "Thank 
\..u. air,* 1 as ii,, Dean replaced his sard 

in Ike lile. Mteiwaid | asked the doc- 
lot what would happen it the boy 

•ad hap.-i , x. raiee. 11,- simply 

said IH will not mi NS one". Ve;.i> 
•Iter I la letter from this 

youag man in which !„■ said t hat the 
moment he stepped b. .,,„,. |) r Pnige 

Sag Ike sard waa Ike tuning point 

• ■I Ins hi kums |,,,w many 

men were lluis intliiem ,.l by the doc- 
tor's 1nor.1l teaeklag. Vrndokaow thai 
the Inauoaec koch on 
As n ataaV rtnariaa, as a 

p.'btieiaii. S* a teacher, be made many 

in. nek b.. .hi*. , great heart. 
"Kail ranks and elasssa 

of people. He kstwd lunch and was 
inn. h heJaVUd tffe have lost a creal 

friend, 

Umnao* hUoKimitfa. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial lUtikling, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non-Athlttic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The (.'ollegian, 
Hockey Assoi iation, 
Masketball Assoi iation, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Ao^ie Squih, 
Musical ( lulis. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, Cleneral Mgr., 403-M 

K. P. Rand, Manager 136 R 

Roger B. Friesd, President 720 
Perry (J. Hartlett, afsmget S325 
John M. Whittier, Manager 170 
Charles \V. Steele, Manager S325 
Irving VV. Slade, Editor 170 

Ernest T. I'utnain, Manager 
Philip II. Dow/den, Manager 
Ciiistav Lindskog, Manager 
T. T. Abeie, l-'.ditor 
Thomas L. Snow, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, <). K. lolsom, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard B. Smith, Manager 
Y. M. C. A., Frederick B. Cook, President 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



«33» 
53° 

S330 
720 

»3'4 
»3«4 



BUY YOUR 



and HOSIERY 



From our store if 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 

th Men's Shoes from $5.00 up 
Sec them in our window 



IPcxic^'s* {Shoe Store 



WANT TO SAVE: MONEY 

We guarantee you good shoes at lower prices. 

SHOE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

Four skilled shoe makers lined up and 
ready to repair your shoes while you 
wait, on the basis that you must be 
satisfied. Try it, you will like our service. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

ON voir WAY TO THE POST OFFICE 

DAMERST ft F0TOS, Prop. 



WINCHESTER 



jackson & cutler sporting and Athletic Goods 

DRV AND FANCV GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office $1.00 

SI.IC by mall. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING C0. 

The Winchester Store 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 18, 1922. 



SHEEPSKINS 

The best way to combat cold weather is with a sheepskin on your back. Oar winter shipment has just arrwea 
and comprises some wonderful coats with Wombat, Coon and Possum collars. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



Where College Men Trade. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Many Dogs Disappear On Mount 
Toby Columbus Day. 

Delta Phi Gamma, with the Fresh- 
man girls as guests, held a hot-dog 
roast and bacon hat M Mount Tohy the 
at it-moon of Columbus Day. They went 
by trolley as far as the foot of the 
mountain and tramped from there to the 
sugar e imps. The weather was ideal 
for hiking and the mountain was beau- 
tiful enough to justify all the line things 
Professor Waugh said of it in his As- 
sembly lecture of the previous week. 
The girls sang for a while after they 
reached the camps; then the ipiestion 
"When do we eat" was heard and 
speedily answered. Not long afterward 
it began to grov. dusk; so they stalled 
down the mountain, hiked as far as 
{forth Amherst, and took the car back 
to the "Abbey." 



The Freshman girls were entertained 
by Miss Skinner in her home last Sun- 
day evening. A supper was served , and 
then Miss Skinner told of her trip to 
Europe 'his summer. 



The Bolster Doisters have lately pre- 
sented to (he Memorial Building a new 
labia for use in the reception room. 



Reception to Juniors. 

The Senior Class of the Two Vein 

course gave a reception to the entire 

junior class last Friday Bight in the 

Memorial Building. The reception lasted 

from MO to MO and dancing was |en- 

joyed form '.Moll. The patrons and 

patronesses were Mr. and Mrs. John 

I'helan Mr. John B. Ilanna, Mr. William 

K. French, and Miss Ed BO L. Skinner. 



THURSDAY ASSEMBLY 

Lev. Reload D. Sawyer of Ware, who 
has served in the pastorate of several 
.•lunches in Massachusetts, and is now 
pastor of the Congregational church in 
Ware, will address the student body in 
Assembly tomorrow. During the last 
deoodO Wev- Mr. Sawyer has been of 
BOOB inliuenee in the polities of our 
state. In 1012, he was a candidate for 
governor, and two years later was 
elected to the State Legislature, in 
which body be has served since then. 



'15.— Doran is the proud father of a 
bou horn a couple of weeks ago, Thomas 
by name. 

'1°.— During the summer Ralph T. 
Howe was appointed to the position of 
Secretary to the President at N. B. 
State College, and adds one more to the 
list of M. A. C. men at Durham. There 
is now quite a colony there, with live 
resident members of the college staff: 
Doran 16, Tirrell 'P.*. Emery "2D, Sulli- 
van '22 and Howe '10, besides Prof. Me- 
Nutt who used to be on the M. A. C. 
I acuity, although not a graduate. 
There are also several M. A. C people 
distributed throughout the state doing 
extension work. 

'21. -Chick Holloa is with the Hanip- 
doa County Fanner's Exchange with 
headquarters in Springfield, 



'21- Harold Allen and Miss Kmily 
VanLennep (both '21) were married last 
month and are now living on a farm in 
West Springfield. 

'21.— Lawrence Pratt is in the Chem- 
istry department of the U. S. D. A., 
Washington, 1). C. 

'21.— C. Donald Kendall is running a 
couple of dairy farms in Grafton. 

'22.— Hobart W. Spring is looming the 
banking game at the B. I. Hospital 
Trust Co., Providence, K. I. 

•22.— s. F. Calhoun is with the Logan 
Johns.. n Co., Ltd., Boston. 

'22- <L B. White anil II B. Wenlsch, 
both of the class of '22, send word from 
Bremen of their arrival in Germany. 
They are out seeing the country. 

'22. — Pickup is teaching at Hillside 
school for boys, in Greenwich Village. 



DEAN LEWIS AWAY 

Continued from page 1 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



Two Year Freshmen Elect. 

The Junior Class of the Two Year 
course have elected the following otti- 
cers to serve for this year: Everett 
Miller, of Fairhaven, president; Aller- 
ton Johnstone of Pasadena. Cat., treas- 
urer; Dorothy Haskell of South llad- 
ley, secretary. 



Fall Baseball Discloses Some Prom- 
ising Material. 
Owing to the inclemency of the 
weather last week, the regular baseball 
practise did not take place, but after 
the clouds had blown away Thursday 
afternoon a few men came out just to 
get their arms warmed up. The regu- 
lar names of the World Series were not 
ployed. Fach day of practice some new 
promising material is discovered and 
for this reason alone, the Fall practice 
is proving a worth-while institution, if 
for no other. 



The Horticultural Department held a 
picnic last Saturday at a pleasant grove 
in eastern Amherst and invited the 
members of the other departments to be 
their guests. Wives of the faculty 
members brought lunch and the De- 
partment of Horticulture provided 
abundant supplies of apples, pears, 
grapes, celery, cider, and hot coffee. 



visit abroad at this time is two-fold; he 
wishes to study the new ex tension 
movement in learning which is now be- 
ing rapidly pushed forward in F.ngland. 
This work is similar to much of the 
work bolag done by certain colleges in 
this country, - the teaching of the 
working-men by maintaining evening 
.-lasses for laborers such as those now 
being experimented with especially in 
some of our larger mill cities. Both 
Cambridge and Oxford are leaders in 
this sort of work in Boglaod. 

The second main purpose of Dean 
Lewis is to finish the translationof a 
Welsh novel which he has been work- 
ing on for some time, and his visit to 
Wales will aid him in polishing up 
parti Of the translation. He will also 
visit the ITiivcrsity of North Wales, the 
home of Mr. Zimmern who visited us 
last year. An interesting part of the 
trip to look forward to is watching the 
.vents in the probable election of a new 
premier in England at some not far 
remote date. 

Dean Lewis will make his head- 
quarters in Chester, England, and 
though he may make a few side trips 
to the Continent, his main work will be 
confined the Islands. He will return 
the latter part of March and so be 
ready to resume his cuties immediately 
in April. 



"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass 



Two new members have been added 
to the Cabinet of the Y. W. C. A. to till 
vacancies caused by the resignations of 
Helen Snow and Hazel Logaa. Dorothy 
Turner '23 is to be secretary, and AimCe 
Geiger '24 is to serve as chairman of the 
Publicity Committee. 



ALUMNI 

•71.— George Leonard has recently 
been retired from the District Court of 
Springfield where he has been clerk for 
thirty eight and one half years. He 
was o member Of the first class to be 
graduated from M. A. C. and was a 
member of that famous Aggie crew 
which defeated Harvard, Brown, and 
Amherst in the early '70s. He par- 
ticipated in nearly all ^collegiate ath- 
letic activities while at Amherst. 

'07. -Clinton C. King is a practicing 
attorney with offices in the Court Sq. 
Building, Springfield. 



Unitarians and Universalists ! 



UNITY CHURCH 



Invites you to its 



STUDENT RECEPTION 

Wednesday Evening, Oct. 18 

AT T-30 P. M. 



Light refreshments, music, dancing, and a good opportunity 

to become acquainted. 



C&rpfivter & Morehous*, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Plact, Amherat, Moot 





Vol. XXXIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



No. 4 



OCTOBER 28 IS DATE SET 
FOR WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 



Thirty Meetings Held All Over the 

World Will Bring Together 

About 700 M. A. C. Men. 

World Aggie night is to he observed 
Oct. 2H with about HO meetings in states 
as far apart as California and Massa- 
chusetts, Montana and Louisiana. Meet- 
ings will he held, too, in Mexico and in 
CobO. More than 700 will attend i Ins. 
meetings, it is estimated. This num- 
ber does not include alumni in New 
York or Washington, where the meet- 
ings have been postponed, Washing- 
ton's till Nov. 20, New York's till Nov. 
11, the day on which the M. A. C. fool- 
ball team plays Stevens. 

Speakers are to he sent from M. A. 0, 
to the meetings in Massachusetts, Con- 
necticut, and Hhode Island. On the 
evening of the 28th at 0-4.1, there will 
he a supper at Draper Hall for the 
alumni who come to Amherst for the 
New Hampshire game aud the meeting. 
At this meeting there win be speeches 
and discussions. 



PHILIP B. D0WDEN ELECTED 
SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT 



FIRST GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
TO BE AT CONWAY NOV. 24 

The Musical Clubs' season is to start 
considerably earlier this fall than it has 
for several years past. Manager Snow 
announces that he has arranged for the 
first concert to be given in Conway, oa 
Friday, Nov. 24. Concerts at Hat lie].] 
and lladley wil! follow soon after. 

With rehearsals being held semi- 
weekly the dec Club has got well 
underway with three of (heir selections. 
The complete program will be an- 
nounced later. The orchestra has; held 

but two rehearsals, but is making good brood of football duiing his whole slay 
progress. flood Freshman talent has 



Officers Elected After Assembly to 
Serve Until Next Term. 

At a recent meeting of the senior 
class, class otlicers were chosen to serve 
until February as follows: 

President, Phillip It. Dowdcn of Sand- 
wich ; vice-president. Luther B. Arling- 
ton of Florence; secretary, Gilbert li. 
Irish of Turner, Me. ; treasurer, Melvin 
II. If al let t of Boekloed; captain, Ver- 
non I). Mudgettof Lancaster; sergeant- 
at -alius, Howard Hates of Cohasset; 
historian, Kleanor W. Hatenian of Arl- 
ington. 

"I'hil" Dowden has been prominent 
in class activities and athletics during 
his three years at Aggie. I'hil is man- 
ager of basketball and captain of team 
"C" on the gridiron. He has been 
class vice-president, and is serving now 
on the Informal Committee. He is a 
member of Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 

Luther Arrington "Arrie," hasserved 
la various capacities on the Coi.i.k.oian, 
Index., Freshman Handbook, and dee 
C:uh, besides holding previous class 
otliee. He is a member of Alpha (Jain- 
ma Kbo. 

"Cil" Irish is a reliable trackman, 
having spent three years on the squad. 
He was a member of the 102:5 fades 
board, the Freshman Show, and the 
Banquet Committee. He served as 
1 1 asB secretary as a Freshman. He is a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha. 

"Mel" Hallett has been prominent in 
track work, on the 102:1 Index Hoard, 
ami in the cast of the Freshman Show 
as a Freshman. He now represents 
ThetaChi on the Intel fraternity Confer- 
ence. 

"Batata" Mudgctt has played a food 



AMHERST ELEVEN SUCCUMBS TO TERRIFIC 

ONSLAUGHT OF M. A. C. WARRIORS 10-6 



Whirlwind Comeback Prolonged During Whole Second Half Tells 

Against Weakened Amherst Line. Grayson and Beal 

Both Score for Aggie. 



turned out for both clubs, which should 
help materially in the success of at least 
part of the season. 



in college, and recently did good work 
Continued on page 8 



CHURCHES OF AMHERST HOLD 



W. C. GROVER AND L. H. KEITH 
ELECTED TO MANAGERSHIPS 



INFORMAL SEASON OPENING 
SATURDAY AFTER THE GAME 

Final arrangements have been made 
for the tirsl Informal of (he \car, to hi 
held in the Memorial building directly 
after Saturday's contest with New 
Hampshire. Wood worth's orchestra 
will he the musical drawing eaid, and a 
cabaret supper will be served downstairs 
in the building as was the custom last 
year. 

Tickets have been on sale fttaot 
terday morning. They are tJf.M, Bad 
may be obtained from Folsom, Huckley, 
Heal, or Dowden of the Senior class, or 
from J. L. Williams, the .Junior mem- 
ber of the committee. It is hoped that 
the men's support of lata flltt Informal 
will insure a successful season for this 
most typical of Aggie dances. 



In the elections held at last Thiirs- 
GET-TOGETHER SOCIALS days assembly, Walter ('. Grover '25 

, „ r , i n ,, won the managership of varsity track 

Last Wednesday evening all the , ' , 

, , r 4 i . t , i .',. , * I and Lewis II. Keith '25 that of varsity 

' hurdies of Amherst held Get-lo- . 

,. u . , „ , ,. . , . , I baseball. Grover comes from Bernard- 
get bar Socials" for the students of , ... . B 
, ,. ., M . . stun and iH a member of Phi Sigma 
both colleges. Many Aggie students i .... * ■> • i 

,. 1 , i u i Kappa. Keith hails from bridgewater. 

went to the various churches and had I ' ' 

, .... . ,. , j Besides winning his numerals as mana- 

splendid times wherever they went. 



Games of various kinds were played 
and thorougly enjoyed. Refreshments 
of ice-cream and applet were generously 
passed round to apease the appetites 
aroused by the games. Qood fellow- 
ship ran high, as always at such gather- 
ings. 

The churches welcome the participa- 
tion of the students in all their services 
and social events. It is hoped that more 
■ ullege men will avail themselves of 
these opportunities, for there is much 
to be gained at all these meetings and 
gatherings. 



gar of Fraabmaa football, a« is also a 

member of the Collegian Hoard. He is 
a member of Kappa Sigma. 



OUR OPPONENTS' SCORES 

LAST SATURDAY 

N. H. STATK 0. Army 33 
BATES 6, MAINE H» 
STEVENS I, Springtield 23 
TUFTS 7, Norwich Q 
MICH. AGGIES 7, So. Dakota 



L 



RURAL PROBLEMS DISCUSSED 
AT LAST ASSEMBLY, OCT. 17 



For the Mist time in o\ cr t weiity years 
the Aggie eleven defeated Amherst 
last Saturdry. It was I be lirst football 
game between the two institutions that 
has ever been held on Alumni Field, 
and ihe result was as satisfying as the 
fact that we were able to entertain our 
visitors on one of the beat "liilirons in 
the east. Over 6000 spectators watched 
the annual battle between the two rival 
institutions which resulted in a lit II win 
for the home team. Tin- coaches ex- 
pless thelnsclw-s as il -.sal lifted with 
Ihe results of the aeiial olleiisc which 
the Maroon altemplcil and they have 
nothing but praise for the stubborn de- 
fense of the Purple. Il was a hard, 
clean, contest llom Ihe start to Ihe 
dual whist le. wilh Ihe ultimate OBtOOBM 
always in <|iiestion. The teams wen 
• -vi-iily notched in Ihe first hall but in 
the last two periods the Attics plaiulv 



Rev. Roland B. Sawyer Shows How 
Aggie Men Can, and Should, 
Aid in Their Solution. 

Hev. Roland B. Sawyer of Ware, at 
last Thursday's Assembly, gave us a 
very interesting discussion of the rural 
problems »n I his state, and how Aggie 
men can help solve the problem when 
I hey graduate and go out into country 
life. Being a minister, Mr. Sawyer had 
to have a text, so he etiose one from 
Poor Uicbard's Almanac, "Experience 
is the best teacher". 

The speaker lirst outlined the rural 
problems, showing that in this stale 
during the last 20 years there have been 
3000 farms abandoned and 5(1% of the 
agricultural acreage lost. He said that 
it was up to us, with the four years' 
training in scientific agriculture given 
us by the state, to retrieve this loss and 
put agriculture on a scientific basis. He 
t'en outlined three ways in which we 
could apply the knowledge gained from 
our experiences here and from the ex- 
periences of men in public life. 

The first thing for us to do when we 
get into a farming community is to re- 
habilitate farm life by putting it on a 
profitable economic basis. The farms 
can and must be made to pay better 
wages to farmers than the cities do, if 
men are going to work them. Oar 
American civilization depends on a 
large and contented rural population ; 
so we must make the farmers contented 
with a high economic status. 
Continued on page 8 




Jamks A. Bkai. '23 
M. A. r. (Quarterback. 

outmatched their opponents from the 
otherend of thetown. In the last three 
periods the JefTmen never had the ball 
within four chalkinarks of the Aggie 

gool. 

Grayson kicked off promptly at 2 l"i 

P.M. ami the Amherst team worked 
the hall rapidly down the held with a 
series of end-runs. Then two forward 
passes from Nail, one to Kyle and the 
other to Leetc, brought the pigskin to 
the Aggie 20-yard line. Two more 
passes were grounded and Nail tried 
a dropkick from the 80-yard line, (tu- 
bal! t->ing to Ihe right of the posts. 
The ball was brought out and Tumey 












J 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



immediately k irke d. The real of th e 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



period was taken up with punts and 
neither got! was threatened. In the 
Moo&d quarter Amherst lost G yards on 
oil-side and then attempted a forward 
pass. When this was urounded, Nail 
punted to Beal on the latter'* 20-yard 
line. Tumey attempted an end run 
bat was tackled for a loss and the next 
play saw the I'urple scoring. Tumey 
then dropped hack for a kick Imt Leete 
hroke through a poor defense and 
(•locked it. The ball rolled back of the 
Maroon goal and Clapp fell on it for a 
touchdown. KeiiKswig, with the sun in 
btteyee, missed the goal. 

The kiekoff was followed by another 
session of punts and on one of these 
Adams fell on a fumble. Hut the Sa- 
brinas were unable to advance the hall, 
so Nail dropped hack for a drop kick. 
l'Yrranli hroke through and blocked 
the attempt and then picked up the 
rolling hall and started down the grid- 
iron wit h a clear Held. Hut I.eele was 
hot on his heels and overhauled him 
after Fenanti had advanced the hall 
over half the length of the field to the 
12-yard line. Three tries were made to 
pierce the Amherst line but the Sa- 
hrina defease was impregnable, and 
Heal dropped the pigskin between the 
posts for a triple counter from the SO- 
yard line. (Mi the following kickotl 
Mctieoch received and ran back for a 
ua in of over 20 yards. Hill intercepted 
t forward and then made a couple of 
long gains tor the Jeff men. The Am- 
herst team was forced to punt, how- 
ever, and Tumey returned. JUIeOfl 
misjudged the ball and Marshinan fell 
on it in the nick of time. The i|iiailer 
ended with the score 0-8 In favor of the 
visitors. 

In the second half it seemed as if the 
millcitim had come. Amherst kicked 
off to Heal, who, advancing the ball 
several Tarda, was about to he upset 
by three I'urple men. In the nick of 
lime, however, he shot the ball in a 
perfect lateral pass o»ei to his team- 
mate (itayson, standing in wail far over 
near the sideline. Willi almost a per- 
fect open field ahead of him the captain 
raced up the field with his opponents 
Hocking at his heels, and was not over- 
hauled anti] he had passed over-10 yards 
of ground. 

This play, one of the most spectacu- 
lar of the day, proved to be the turning 
point of the contest. With this in- 
centive to victory, nothing would stop 
the Aggie team. The Maroon 

eleven marched down the field at will. 
Time ami again McGeoeh tore through 
the Amherst line for substantial gains 
hut, with the ball on Amherst's 5-yard 
line, Leete intercepted a forward pass. 
The I'urple warriors immediately 
kicked out of danger, but once again 
the Agates carried it into the shadow of 
the goal poBts. Hut this time the for- 
ward was incompleted and once again 
Xail punted out. Captain Urayson tore 
off a 30-yard run around the end and 
Tumey and McGeoeh made a couple of 
short gains through the line and then 
the period ended. 

The last period was one that will 
never be forgotten as long as football is 
played at Aggie. The Amherst Ho* 
held and Heal tried for another field 
goal but the ball was blocked. Am- 
herst punted, but nothing could stop 
that Maroon aggregation. In three 
plays the hall was back on Amhersts' 
fourth chalk mark. Captain Grayson 
took the ball and it looked as though 
he would be tackled in his tracks. Hut, 
with a remarkable exhibition of broken- 
field running, he got to the side line 
and walked the tightrope from there to 



the goal line, making the winning score 
Beal dropped the ball 
point. From 



of the game 
over for the additional 
here to the final whistle the ball was in 
I'urple territory. Grayson inlercepted 
a forward pass and McUeoch tore 
through the line for another gain and 
another score was in the oiling when 
the final whistle blew. 
The lineups were: 



M. A. C. 




AMHKKST 


Marshmau le, 




re, Kirk 


Salman, It 




rt, Clapp 


Myrick, lg 




rg, Williams 


Alger, c 




c, Leete 


Nowers, rg 




lg, Hoeuau 


Mohor, rt 




It, Adams 


Fenanti, re 




le, Kyle 


Heal, qb 




qb. Jillson 


Grayson, lhb 




rhb, Heusswig 


Tumey, rhb 




lhb, Nail 


McGeoeh, fb 




fb, Hill 


Score — Mass. Aggie 


10, 


Amherst 6. 


Score by periods : 








1 


2 3 4 


Aggie, 





3 7 


Amherst, 





6 



Touchdowns— Grayson, Clapp. Point 
from goal after touchdown— Beal. Field 
goal — Heal. Iieferee— Bankart of Dart- 
mouth. Umpire — Keegan of Pittslield. 
Linesman — Johnson of Springtield. 
Time — 15 minute periods. Substitu- 
tions — Mass. Aggies: Sargent for Fer- 
ranti, Bike for Marshman, Mudgett for 
Myrick, Barrows for Grayson. Amherst: 
Wilcox for Kirk, Dunbar for Boenau, 
Sylvester for Leete, Vail for Williams. 



GORDON'S YANKS WIN TWO 
GAMES IN WORLDS SERIES 



Doc Makes Beat Hit of Game Him- 
self. Other Hitting Looks Good. 

More fall baseball practice was held on 
Tuesday and Wednesday of last week. 
Tuesday another game of our "World's 
Series" was played, the Yankees again 
proving their superiority over their op- 
ponents the Giants by the score of three 
to nothing. This is the second straight 
win for the victors and one more will 
make them the champs. 

Wednesday several men turned out 
hut many deemed it too cold for a game, 
so the men were given batting and 
Holding practice. It is hoped that the 
practice will continue for two or three 
weeks more, or until cold weatbei pro- 
hibits it. 

The Yanks' victory over the Giants 
last Tuesday could not be mentioned 
without a word regarding Capt. "Doc" 
Gordon's home-run. It was a long hit 
which went well past the Memorial 
Building. "Doc" is a fast man as he 
went around the bases in record lime 
last spring, and he had taken his seat 
on the bench before the ball was re- 
trieved. Some good hitting is being 
done and the prospects for the spring 
are as good as can be desired. 



SARGENT '23 TAKES PLACE 
OF W00D0RTH IN SENATE 

At last Thursday' s assembly, Rich- 
mond H. (Huck) Sargent '23 was elected 
to the Senate to fill the place of Lev- 
eretl S. Woodworth. Huck comes from 
Buxton. Me., and has made a good 
record at Aggie. Besides serving on 
several class athletic teams, he has 
been class captain, a member of the 
Band, and both the Informal and Soph- 
Senior Hop Committees. He now stars 
on both the varsity gridiron and dia- 
mond and has been chosen next year's 
captain of baseball. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Sole agents for the best and largest line of ready-made 
clothing in the world. 

Hart Schaflner & Marx Clothes 

are made with all the care possible from the best fabrics that 
money can buy. AND — their guarantee makes possible the 
greatest clothes value you can find. 

Overcoats from $30 to $50 
Suits from - $35 to $45 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for over Thirty-five Years. 



Freshmen : 

In order to have a complete record of the brief years at Aggie, you should start an M-Book at once. Watch it grow 
until it becomes the most highly treasured chapter in the history of your life. We have something new to offer in this 
line — something that you should not fail to see before making a purchase. There's a book for every pocket-book. 



i 



INN 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 

With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



PaKe'® Shoe Store 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



ALL OUT 



"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mai 



£&rp{ivtcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mam 



FOR MEDF0RD 



The Comoy Pipe 

We Kave a large and direct importation or Comoy 
Pit>es. Trie House of Comoy probably occupies the 
largest Briar tpipe factory in tbe United Kingdom, and 
tbeir £itpes and otker products are known for tneir 
quality in a land wkere good pipes are common. 

Our stock of the widely-known 
and appreciated Dunhill Pipes is 
the largest and most complete 
ever shown in Amherst. 

Tne Dunhill pipe needs no introduction to tbe large 
army of Dunhill smokers. Its cool, sweet smoke is too 
well known. 

We also have Meerschaum Pipes, 
Three B. Pipes in great variety, 
and all Smokers' Needs. 



NOVEMBER 18 



CHANGES ANNOUNCED FOR 
CROSS-COUNTRY SCHEDULE 



Time Trials Last Saturday Showed 
Up Well. 

Time trials over tbe full cross-coun- 
try course were held last Saturday by 
Coach Derby's men, and some encour- 
aging figures were made. Tbe time of 
Stevenson '24 was extra fast, nearly 
equalling the record for tbe course. 

Some changes have been made in the 
schedule as published last week, and 
the correct schedule as now arranged is 
as follows: 

Nov. 4— Worcester Tech at Worcester. 
Nov. 11— Wesleyan at M. A. C. 
Nov. 14 — Pending with Amherst on tbe 

Amherst Ix>ng Green Course. 
Nov. 18— New Englands at Boston. 



FRESHMEN DEFEAT FAST 

NORTHAMPTON ELEVEN 190 



Display Ability and Good Material 

In First Game of Schedule. Play 

Rosary High Saturday. 

The Freshman Football aggregation 
journeyed to Northampton last Friday 
where tbey won tbe first game of tbe 
seasou against the Northampton High 
School eleven by the score of 19-0. Al- 
though his team won the game by a 
safe score, Coach Collins was not satis- 
fied with the game as a whole. The in- 
ability of tbe line to do its job well and 
the poor running of the backfield 
caused the loss of many valuable yards 
in tbe first half. 

The second half brought some im- 
provement. By the aid of the good 
work of Tulenko in tbe line and White 
in the backfield tbe Frosh greatly out- 
distanced tbeir opponents as to ground 
gained. Northampton did not get tbe 
ball inside the Frosh 50-yard line in the 
second half, which only shows that tbe 
boys got some of their fight back and 
showed the Bluff that tbey were capa- 
ble of. 

The first score came in the third quar- 
ter, as the result of a criss-cross play, 
Sbedd taking tbe ball over. Jones 
missed tbe goal. Tbe second tally was 
made after a series of line bucks up the 
10-yard line when Buckley look the ball 
across tbe line. Jones' kick was blocked. 
A brilliant run by Grayson after catch- 
ing a punt on the opponent's 45-yard 
line netted the final score in tbe last 
period. Jones kicked the goal. 



Saturday tbe Frosh will go to llolyoke 
where they will play the fast Hosary 
High team. It promises to be a hard 
game and this week will be spent in 
preparation for it. Coach Collins con- 
templates an entire change in line-up. 

Gordon, as quarter for the losers, han- 
dled his team well, but tbey lacked the 
power to stop the onslaught of the 
visitors. Captain Lucier played a good 
game at fullback for Northampton, 
also. 

The line-up: 

AUG1K KKKHIIMAN. NOHTII AMI'TON IIMill 



Bower, le 
MacKay, It 
Tulenko, lg 
Couhlg, c 
Gavin, rg 
Jones, rt 
Sbedd, re 
Buckley, qb 
White, fb 
Gustafson, rhb 
Grayson, lhb 



le, Farrell 

It, Conies 

lg, Sbeehau 

s, Willard 

rg, Burrows 

rt, Winn 

re, Bissallion 

(|1>, Gordon 

rhb. Kly. 

fb, (Capt.) I.ueier 

lhb, Coleman 



Keferee— Kennedy. Umpire— Lucier. 
Timer— Dunn. Linesmen, Augus and 
Dunn. Time— 4-ten minute periods. 




POULTRY DEPT. SCHEDULE 
ANNUAL SHOW NOV. 24-25. 

The Poultry Department has decided 
to bold its annual Market Poultry and 
Egg Show at Stockbridge Hall Novem- 
ber 24 and 25. These dates were chosen 
in order that eggs and roasters for 
Thanksgiving might be sold. Tbe 
Poultry Show is held each year as part 
of the market poultry course. Work 
connected with tbe show is done by 
the students taking the course. Some 
person not a member of the M. A. ('. 
faculty, prominent in market poultry 
work, judges the exhibits and gives 
demonstrations. Last year Dr. Ben- 
jamin of New York City, formerly with 
the Poultry Department at Cornell, 
acted as judge. Tbe judge for this 
year has not yet been decided upon. 

At a staff meeting last Saturday, the 
members of tbe Poultry Department 
talked over ways and means for hold- 
ing the annual Market Poultry and Ejtl 
Show. Tbe Department holds its stall 
meetings every Saturday morning at 
nine o'clock. Reports on extension 
work and on the production and con- 
dition of tbe birds at tbe poultry plant 
and on the experimental farm are read. 
Business is transacted and live problems 
confronting the Department are dis- 
cussed. 



Plenty of "pep", but no 
-Jazz"! 

Young men's clotbes. 

Quality of design as well as 
quality of fabrics and tailoring. 

Koukks I'kkt Company 

Broadway Herald Square 

at 13th St. "Four at 35th St 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 41st St. 

NKW YOUK CITY 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other k«<»I t Ionics to <*ut. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel.416-W) lladley. Mass 

The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 



Tel. 489-W 



P. I). HOMANS, 

Prop. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Rmpmlrlng While U Wmlt 

NKW I'HK l.s 
Mm'* Wtiol.-Sol.-N.ltuM.erll.-HM . . $2.50 

Men's Half Bole*. Rubber Heals . . . $1.75 

Mcn'H KuMx-r Holes, KuMicr Heels . . $2.25 

Men's Half Sol.-i $1.35 

Work Ouaranteed-AMHKICKT HOI KK 



a 



October the 14th is Candy Week 

and are running special 

APOLLO" CLASS A at $1 .25 per box 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIA^ 

Published etery Wednesday by the 
Students of the MasnachutetU Ag- 
ricultural College. ^^^^^_ 

BOA HI) OF EDITORS. 



lmnm W.S..A..K-23 Editor-in-Chief 

!,, , i.ku It. Arkinuton '28 Manning Editor 
ASBOCIATK EDITOKS. 
,. •>tn<M A88t Man'B Kditor 

■OUMtOM < OlIKN "23 

JOHN M. WH ITT IKK 23 

I,. H'KANCIS KUTMBOTtt 
Kuril M. Wool> '24 

Lkwii ii. Kbits "26 

ClIAHI.KH f. OI.IVK11. .IK. '2r. 

BUSINESS DKPABTMEWT. 
Owhn E. Foi-iOM '23 B> l .lnei.M»n«.r 

Kohkk, K. Stf.kkk W Adverti.ln* M»n«er 
inn-it-!.. .tr.i.KN'24 <ir<ulatlon Manager 

|»HNAI.I> W. U»i»' a 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at ••cond-rlaw matter at the Amherat 
Po.t Office. Accepted for mailing at ...ecla 
rate of nonage provided for In section 1103. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized Augnst 20. 1918. 



The New Football Era. 
K.»r the I'mhI lime in twenty years the 
Mass. aggie football lot" »ent lhe Am - 
lurst eleven to defeat. For the second 
time in i:. v.iirs the two teams have met 
hl .,„ :umllil l football flash. The old 
bloodthirsty rivalry which caused the 
Initial break in athletic relations has 

goM t,,t,ver. Last Sat unlay 's game 
proved that a strong spirit of sports- 
manship permeates both student 
bodies. Football, lhe most enthusias- 
tic game, calling forth energy in its 
Boat strenuous form from the partici- 
pants, and working spectators to the 
BlgOOM piu-h of excitement, failed to 
arouse a. lisamecablefeelimi on either 

side. . 

As a proof of the fine spirit with 
which the teams played, it can be 
pointed out that neither team received 
any serious injuries. Kven in the 
slowest and least spirited games, in- 
juries are liable to result and when a 
a team is -'out for blood" serious in- 
juries are OommoB. This does not 
mean that every member of the rival 
,.l,.vens did not play his hardest, for 
they did. Williams of the Amherst 
lean, plaved an excellent and danger- 
ous yame even thonuh suttering from 
an injured neck and a Iour deep gash 
in the side of his throat. 

The opposing student bodies did not 
eve each other with distrust across the 
gridiron, bol swapped cheers and songs 
with only one intent-to cheer their 
teams on to victory. The greatct 
confidence was lodged in the Aggie 
s tands,perhaps even between the halves 
when Amherst stood ahead, as shown 
by material support the Aggie rooters 
were willing to K ive. This came is 
sure to go down on the athletic annals 
of Agk'ie history as one of lhe most 
important as well as successful footba'l 
names ever played. 



Maintaining College Attendance. 

Should men be Bonked out of col- 
lege? There are some who answer in 
the negative and claim that everybody 
who is able to got in college should 
stay there. Give him another chance 



| they say, he Burely will make good 
this time. 

There are very few who are not 
guilty of thiB last attitude. Fraternity 
representatives visit professors to find 
the standing of their younger members 
and in ease of low marks the professor 
is apt to be pestered with appeals to 
pass the delinquent at least. Appeals 
to the lower authorities failing, the cry 
is next carried to the president who is 
the final power in each case. Some- 
times his investigation into the situa- 
tion will result in the student in ques- 
tion reinaininii in college, more often 
it will not. There may be times when 
some higher authority is brought to 
bear on the president who then has no 
choice in the matter. The latter result 
is entirely wrong and due, if true, to 
the state controlled college system. 

At present the state is not over-sup- 
plied with students. The percentage 
of students who flunk out as Freshmen 
has been constantly increasing, in fact 
it has increased so much as to be alarm- 
ing. This may be due in part to the 
lowering of the entrance requirements 
one year ago. If the college aut horities 
planned to flunk 60 percent of the 
neophytes as some college authorities 
do, then the whole matter would not 
take on such serious aspects; 

"erhaps the upper classmen do not 
impress it upon the Freshman that it is 
necessary to study and study hard to 
obtain a degree. Perhaps they have 
passed through the more crucial stages 
of their college career, and forget the 
(litliculties encountered. At any rate it 
is up to the Sophomores, Juniors and 
Seniors to encourage the Freshmen to 
greater scholastic efforts. 

What effect does the situation have 
on flunking men from college t From 
the professors viewpoint none whatso- 
ever. If a student is unable to attain 
the required proficiency in any course, 
be should be flunked. If it is a (|iies- 
tion as to whether a man should go out 
of college or not, base the answer on 
hard accurate facts, not sentimentalism. 
If the facts are not accurate, then it is 
possible to observe a tolerable leniency 
befitting the occasion. 

The fundamental principle, however, 
is to maintain the college standaids, 
the maintenance of attendance al- 
though vital is of secondary importance. 
If the college does not interest enough 
high school graduates to maintain a 
healthy growth, then the subjects 
offered must be extended and carefully 
calculated so as to meet the require- 
ments of the coming generation. 



If. 



If we only had a college song on a 
par with that possessed by Amherst 
College, how much better our own 
mass singing would be and how much 
more satisfaction we would derive from 
singing! Those Amherst songs cer- 
tainly sounded fine from our bleachers! 

JOHN B. HANNA TO BiAilN NEW 
SERIES OF LECTURES NOV. 2 



On Thursday, Nov. 2, Mr. John B. 
Manna will begin a series of six discus- 
sions on "Christianity and the Indus- 
trial Reconstruction". This course is 
offered without credit and without re- 
quired readings and is open to all who 
are interested in the practical applica- 
tion of religion to the problems of our 
industrial life. The first session of the 
class will be held in French Hall at 7-00 
p. M., and the place and hour of subse 



COMMUNICATION 

To tiik KmroH ok tjik Coi.i.koian : 

From observation of the Mass. Aggie 
scores from a distance it looks as 
though the team was fighting at least. 
Have some one in the office write me a 
short note, if you haven't time,, giving 
me some idea of the scrap and the 
bunch you have. 

Frankly when I started this letter I 
didn't intend to make it longer than a 
paragraph, but every time 1 concentrate 
„n football for a few minutes 1 look 
back upon my experience at Aggie, 
and link it up with the thing in which 
I am most interested now, business. I 
noticed in the Collegian there is still 
great need of more material and 1 am 
tempted to loosen up a few itleas or sell- 
ing points in regard to men going out for 
the team or actually playing on the 

varsity. ■ 

I remember having several "bull fests 
back in 1919 with one of your class- 
mates who was a strong non-athletic 
man and who was particularly unfavor- 
able toward football. "What is it going 
to get you,anyway,"he frequently asked. 

The experience will be of no use after 
you graduate and the training you are 
going through now will only develop 
your body to such an extent that, when 
you get out of school and in business, 
perhaps, the over-developed body will 
simply be a handicap 

Ab I look back on the expeiience, 
here are some of the things football did 
for me and will do for other men : 

Football develops determination, the 
will to do and to win. 

It instills courage. To tight against 
great odds, to keep on fighting when 
your followers think you are licked, to 
come out of the game beaten by score 
only hut determined to win the next 
game- that's courage aud that's foot- 
ball. 

Football creates confidence. It 'ests 
man's ability, craftiness and endurance 
against the same qualities in many 
other men. With these qualities devel- 
oped from experience, the football man 
goes into the game sure of making a 
tackle, sure of catching a punt and 
certain of making the gain. When 
the season is over that sure feeling 
Htays and demonstrates itself in other 
work. It gives confidence to do. 

Football developes the body and the 
mind, the training builds the muscles 
and strengthens the system. The con- 
centration on the play, the signals and 
the objective make for quick and clear 

thinking. 
Of what use are these things to the 

football man in later life? They are 
exactly the basis for success in any 
line of work. A man may have other 
good quaities, "but determination, 
courage and confidence, with a strong 
body and a clear mind will take bim 
down the middle of the field for a goal 
against many odds in any line of busi- 
ness or in any profession. 

It is an honor to be on the Varsity, 
but in the last analysis it is a greater 
honor to be a member of the second 
team and to be the cause of developing 
a winning Varsity football team with- 
out the glory but with the bard aud 
thankless expeiience of doing your job 
well. That's football! 

Sincerely, 

"Red" DAitLixti. 



Town Hall, Amherst^ 

That. Meithan. Theodore 
ThtircHav Roberta and Lou Wilton In 
lnUrStlcty f.'yJV LeadinB CUi«tn." 

Here's the comedy drama 
knockout of the season! Writ- 
ten by Ceo. Ade. Americas 
funniest humorist. 

Newt Comedy 




BUKBEKKY WOOL COATINGS 



Mat. 3. Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Alma Ruben*. Harmon 
Ford and Normon Kerry In 
"Find the Woman," by Ar- 
thur s.oneis Roehe. one of 
the most thrlllliiir.enirro8sinii 
and fascinating mystery pic- 
tures ever filmed. 
Sport Review. "CeaUurt of 

the Field." 
2-reel MaeR Sennett Comedy 



Gatton Glatt and Gladys 
Coburn In "God's Cruci- 
ble," from Ralpb Connor • 
great story. "The Foreigner. 
Newt 
2-reel Sunshine Comedy 



Monday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45 8-30 



Kannle Hurst's great Satur- 
day Evening I'ost story. Just 
Around the Corner." with a 
cast including Slrfrid Holm- 
quist. A beautiful story of 
New York's tost tide. 
Pathe Review 

2-reel Sunthlne Comedy 



College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 



Hair Bobbing 

Facial Massage 

Head Treatment 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 
Eevrything All "Write" Here 




no matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Taper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Pens, 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc. 
Every article is warranted, and our 
prices a^e as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

How to net acquainted— 
Attend a club night dance. 

Ever) other Wednesday, starting Oct. 25th 

Enjoyable evening spent with con- 
genial young people guaranteed. 

Every FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Beginning Sept. 29th. 

Popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lesion* by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



Lost: — Monday afternoon on the way 
up-town from the library, the barrel of 
a small Conklin crescent-filler fountain 
pen. Will the tinder please leave at the 



i k Dean's office or the Abigail Adams 

qaenl meetings will be determined by »™ a ou 

1 , Uouse . 

members of the class. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suite made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suit* Tressed 50c Military Tailoring 



l^ilfil 




3 



T is a very great privilege to have Burberry Overcoats to offer you, aud you in turn 
should feel that it is a very great privilege to be able to buy such coatsiu Amherst. 
Kurberrys manufacture or control the production of an immense variety of materials, 
woven from the choicest yarns, and unobtainable from any other source. Both patterns 
and colorings of Burberry cloths are di£iiiigui*>lud by refreshing origiuulity and good taste, 
their unique beauty and artistic charm being combined with unrivalled weather-resistance, 
light weight and durability. 

When yon buy a coat, buy one that you can be proud to own— a Burberry from WALSH 






ROISTER DOISTERS TO GIVE 
PRIZE FOR BEST 1-ACT PLAY 



Contest Starts Now with Rules Sub- 
mitted Below. 

At a recent meeting of the Uuister 
Doislers it was decided to further the 
interest in dramatics at M. A. C. by 
offering a prize of $25 for the best one- 
act play to be submitted to a selection 
committee before April 1. 

It is hoped that the play can be pre- 
sented the evening of High School 
Day, and that such a performance he 
an annual affair from then on. 

Following are the rules of com- 
petition : 

m I. KB. 

1. The play is to be original with 
the student. It is to be in one act and 
to run not more than thirty-five minu- 
tes when produced. 

2. The play must be mailed on or 
before April 1st, 1923, to Professor 
Frank P, Hand, North Amherst, Mass. 
ft must be signed with a nom de plume, 
and in a sealed envelope accompanying 
the manuscript must be submitted a 
paper giving both the assumed aud 
real names of the author. 

3. There shall be three judges ap- 
pointed by the Flay Committee of the 
Koister Doisters. 

4. The Roister Doisters reserve the 
right to reject all entries or to select a 
play tor the prize without the obliga- 
tion of producing the play. 

f>. The Koister Doisters reserve the 
right to present the prize play without 
royalty. 

6. The prize shall consist of twenty- 
live dollars in gold. 

7. The contest is open to all regular 
four year students of M. A. C. 



MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN FOR 
M. A. C. C. A. TO BE THIS WEEK 

The Christian Association of the col- 
lege has made plans to conduct a cam- 
paign for new members during the 
coming week. The campaign will last 
from tomorrow afternoon after Assem- 
bly until the coming Assembly. The 
leaders of the campaign expect to in- 
terview all men of the four year course 
within this time, 

The organization formerly known on 
the campus as the Y. M. C. A. has been 
recognized in an autonomous form un- 
der the name of the M. A. C. Christian 
Association. " The purpose of this 
organization is to make effective in the 
"liege, in this community, and in the 
world the standard of character set 
forth in the life and teachings of Jesus 
Christ." A man may become a mem- 
bef by subscribing to this purpose. It 
ucerely hoped by the officers of the 
V. that as many as possibly can will 

in the Association when ihey are ap- 
proached on the subject in order that 
this year, as never before, the organiza- 
tion may mean something to everyone 
concerned. 



THETA CHI HOUSE-WARMING 
FRIDAY OPENS NEW HOUSE 

Theta Chi Fraternity otlicially opened 
their new home at 79 Pleasant Street 
on Friday afternoon and evening, Oct. 
2(1, from 3-10 i». m. on, with a house- 
warming well attended by both students 
and faculty. 

The new home, which is directly 
across the sweet from the former 
bouse, was purchased from Mr. Qeorge 
B, Cogswell in July. It is a ten room 
bouse of recent construction, and well 
adapted to fraternity needs. 

All who came were given a chance to 
inspect the rooms, and refreshments ot 
punch and cookies were served. 



JOHN CROSBY OF ARLINGTON 
PRESIDENT OF CLASS OF 1925 

The Sophomore class held its first 
class meeting of the year in Stock- 
bridge hall immediately after Assembly 
last Thursday and the election of class 
officers for the year took place. Tin- 
results announced were as follows: 
President, John Crosby, of Arlington; 
vice-president, Hussell Seaver, of Fast 
Hridgewater; secretary, Linwood Far- 
rington, of Chelmsford; treasurer, 
Kdward Ingraham, of Millis; historian, 
.hi mes Hat al, of Lawrence; captain, 
Charles Mc'ieoch, of Providence, K. 1. ; 
M-rgeaiit-at-aims, Herbert Marx, ol 
liolyoke; on the Honor Council, Milton 
Taylor, of Chatham. 



REV. JAMES E. WARD TO TEACH 
ON "CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY" 

The Kev. James K. Ward, locally known 
as the "parson." will begin a series of 
discussions on Thursday evening, Nov. 
2, at 7 o'clock, in Memorial Hall The 
theme of the course will be "The Chris- 
tian Philosophy of Life." A part of the 
course will be devoted to a discussion 
of the faiths of mankind. Mr. Ward 
conducted similar courses last year on 
the campus with marked vigor and 
originality of thought. Further an- 
nouncement of the topics for discussion 
will be made next week. 



THETA CHI HOUSE PARTY 

Theta Chi Fraternity held a success- 
ful house-party in their new house on 
Saturday, Oct. 21, immediately after 
the Amherst game. Fifteen couples 
were present. The chaperons were 
Mrs. Crane from Mt. Holyoke and Miss 
Sampson from Smith. 



OVERlADAMS' DRUGlSTORE 



NOTICE 

The following Index pictures will be 
taken at Mill's Studio next Sunday, 
October 29. 

10-00 a. m.— Lambda Chi Alpha. 
10-15 a. m.— Kappa Gamma Phi. 
10-30 A. m. — Q.T. V. 
10-45 A. m.— Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

The four class pictures are to be 
taken after the next Sunday Chapel, 
Nov. 5th, on Stockbridge steps. 



Cbompson's Gmclp Calks 

liny a name hag to carry your hooks In. \N I 
have Hold a number of them for tlii* ihiiim.kc. 
Only 11.9. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

Cigarx ami CigarcttcM 8|>eclal pi ice |iei carton 
on CliiaielteM. 

SclirarTt'u < hocolates ami other leading lines 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 



ONE-CENT SALE ! 

Thursday, 

Friday and 

Saturday 

Nov. 2, Nov. 3, Nov. 4 
HENRY ADAMS & CO. 



Suits 



Overcoats 



Topcoats 



We have a fine selection of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes, and right 
now is the best time to invest in a new Norfolk or topcoat. If you 
want to look right and feel right 'tis Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 

YOU WANT 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MENS OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block. 

Let us fit you out for the Game and Dance, Saturday. 



Trie Best Kind of a 

KICK-OFF 

tkat you can make at trie beginning of your 
college year is to tell your newsboy to bring 
you each evening the 

Boston Evening transcript 



TlhTMareachusetts ColIegTan, Wedneidgy, October ^5,^»22. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 25, 1922. 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pret.ing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Ituy your nreMliiR tlrket from R.GMMM'M 

FULL D*ESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all ttaa 

MMif flxlnic*. TO RENT or FQR SALE 

Home Brom. Nmokwmar 

..-.i-r vinir next Suit or Ovareoat ban »» w - 

H Z '.'I ,^n Wool.-,,* III tba lat-H. pat- 

', , h ■ iwavH .... hand. The high a«»MtyofoM 

work W apparent M funry |WMM I ry M 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdaihar. 

11 Amity St. Next to Weatern Union Tel. Office 



SENATOR CHAMBERLAIN TO 
SPEAK HERE IN ASSEMBLY 

The speaker in assembly tomorrow 
will be Senator William S. Chamber- 
lain »f Springfield. Mr. Chamberlain 
bas been a member of the Senate for 
the last eight or ten years and during 
that time haw served on some of its 
most important committees, lie is a 
thoroughly educated man and an enter- 
taining as well as a forceful speaker. 



INDEX COMPETITION STARTS 
NOW FOR ALL SOPHOMORES 

All 1MB men vUhlaf lo oompota for 
positions on the I9S0 IMGI bo«rd rtpo* 

to A. f. Gay at the Theta Chi House to 
learn the conditions of the competition. 
Men are needed for Literary, Art, Busi- 
ness and Photographic d*pwtme«td. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO %92S 



S. S. HYDE 

optloUtn ««c* jeweler 
<i Pleasant Street (up one fllulit . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

HlK »en Alarm (lotks ami other K.liaMi- Makes 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

ftELECT CATERING 

at RmmmM* Trices. 

Informal* a Specialty 

IS S<> I'rospect St.. Amherst. Mass. 

fe/. 566-M 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The Social Union entertainment 
which was to have been held on Decem- 
ber first has been postponed to Decem- 
ber K. 



Money was collected at Assembly last 
Thursday to pay for music stands for 
the band and for cloth for the while and 
red hats the Freshmen will wear to 
form an "M" on the bleachers at the 
New Hampshire game. 



ITS A HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT 
To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 

The work is done by the Goodyear 
Welt Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



M 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-claBB 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

|| Pleasant SI., Amherst, Mass. 



There will be a rehearsal of the band 
Wednesday evening at T-M P. m. in the 
Social Inion Rooms. Every member of 
the hand should be present. 



The Graduate Club will hold an in- 
formal dance and card party in Memorial 
Hall, November 11 at 8-80 v. m. for the 
faculty and graduate students. Tickets 
maybe obtained from any member of 
the graduate school at fitly cents per 
couple. 



JOHN G. READ 

192-4 

has bought out the agency for 

Local Photographs 

formerly held by 

E. F. BLISS, JR. 

Pictures of everything on campus. 

"Get it from Johnny." 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B.~DRURY 

10 Main Street. 



Fine Groceries 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pail 



— on — 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMINGS, Northampton 



The past week the college was the 
recipient of a picture of the crew that 
rowed in the Hatfield Kegetta in 1H70 
attains! the Amherst College Juniors, 
that famous race with which every M. 
A. C. man is familiar. This picture 
was the gift of Frank P. Toole. 

The crew consisted of: V.V. Eldred 
'73, stroke; S. A. Duncan '74. number 
OM;Q. B. Allen '71, number two; G. 
1$. Leonard '71, number three; H. B. 
Simpson, It, number four; K. ft. Hardy 
'74, bow and captain. 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 



Aim 



ith 



Hills Studio -Phone 456-H 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SING LE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



ALUMNI 

'11.— Kolaml II. Patch is Trofessor of 
Floriculture at the Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College. 

13.— R. A. Lundgren has just been 
placed in charge of the agricultural 
department of Harwich High School. 

15._Seth W. banister is teaching 
academic subjects at the Norfolk 
County School. 

IS. — A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 

Ernest Ritter of Hard wick, Oct. 9. 1981. 

H) —smart P. Batchelder is teaching 

agricultural science at Reading High 

School. 

•21.— H. J. Sampson is biology in- 
structor at Harvard. 

'22. — Paul L. Burnett is teaching at 
the Vermont State School of Agri- 
culture. 

•22.— "Bill" Peck, is in the fruit 
growing industry with his father at 
Stow. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for tad!. 



The Store of Quality and Service 

invites your attention 
to out line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We carry 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 

— IN — 

Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly ami pn.mply done. 



Work called for and delivered. 

Saw money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 

Tel. 9-J 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



-OK- 



College Footwear 



in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studlo.b Pone 456-R, P.O. Block 



A native Chinese priest, the Rev. 
Harvey Foo Ding Huang of Hankow, 
will preach especially to students at 
One* Church next Sunday morning. 
He is a graduate of Boone University, 
Wuchang, and is now studying at the 
Episcopal Theological School in Cam- 
bridge. The corporate communion of 
the Episcopal students at Aggie will be 
at 7-45 and breakfast in (irace House at 
n-20. All are invited. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS | 

ITOO&POH vi i D 

273-279 High St., Holyoke 

Tml. WB2-WB3 




The 

Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

As students, we wish to serve you in every way, so if you want something we don't carry 

just tell us and we will carry it. 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 



T1TH $35.00 worth of 
' good Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal mixture, 
well fed with good roughage, 
you ean produce at current 
prices $135.00 worth of milk. 

These feeds to he found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealers stock. 

CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO. 

New York Chicago 



2 3% Protein 



40% Protein 




JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KItS IN 

DRV AND FANCV GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 by mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non-Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The Collegian, 
Hotkey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 
Richard Mellen, Manager 1 7 5— J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



F. V. Rand, Manager 
Roger B. Fiiend, President 
Perry (I. Bartlett, Manager 
John M. Whittier, Manager 
Charles VV. Steele, Manager 
Irving VV. Slade, Kditor 
Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 
Philip B. Dowden, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 
T. T. Abele, Kditor 
Thomas L. Snow, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, (). K. Folsom, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard 1$. Smith, Manager 
Y. M. C. A., Frederick B. Cook, President 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



136-R 
720 

170 

170 

8336 
S3o 

8330 
720 

83»4 
83M 



BUY YOUR 



SHOES and HOSIERY 



From our store if 



WANT TO SAVE MONEY 

We guarantee you good shoes at lower prices. 

SHOE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

Four skilled shoe makers lined up and 
ready to repair your shoes while you 
wait, on the basis that you must be 

satisfied. Try it, you will like our service. 

» 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

ON YOUR WAY TO TH1 POST OFFICE 

DAMERST ® F0T0S, Prop. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 












The Massachusetts Collegian, WedaesdayrOctober 25^192* 



READY TO WEAR 

„„« find a better fit or neater fabric and style than is embodied in 

— *— "-" OT ^inK BROS. & GAULT 




COUNCIL OF WOMEN MEET 
AND BANQUET AT M. A. C. 

The fourth coherence of the Advisory 
Council of Women was held Friday and 
Saturday last week in the Abigail Adams 
House. Friday evening a banquet was 
held in Draper Uall, following which 
the guests went to the mass nieetiug. 
After the mass meeting the members of 
theCouncil were entertained by the girls 
in the living room of the dormitory. 
Saturday morning a meeting was held 
in the Memorial BuildinR at which 
President Butterfield presided. Eleanor 
Bateman '23 spoke on what it means to 
be a student at M. A. C. Elizabeth 
Farley "26 spoke on her practical farm 
work. Miss Bena Erhard '10 spoke on 
"Junior Club Girls as Future M. A. C- 
Stndents". Mrs Joseph Leach, Miss 
Annie Burke, and Mrs. George U. 
Crocker, members of the Council 
addressed the meeting on the work of 
the Council. 

The Advisory Council of Women 
consists of representatives of various 
women's organizations and such other 
women as may be helpful in furthering 
the interests of women's work at this 
college. Its purpose is to aid in the 
promotion and development of women's 
work, including agriculture and home- 
making, and to assist in the interpre- 
tation of that work throughout the 
State. 




SENIOR ELECTION 

Continued from page 1 



on the dairy judging team at St. Paul. 
He is also active in the Animal Hus- 
bandry Club. 

Howard Bates has played class and 
varsity football, and as a Freshman 
added his strength to the six-man rope- 
pull team. 

Eleanor Bateman has been promi- 
nent in all co-ed affairs of her class and 
college, especially with ber musical and 
dramatic talent. She has been an active 
member of the Roister Doisters while in 
college. 



ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page 1 



Next we must help the farmer find 
political expression. The farmer must 
organize and send representatives to 
the legislature and keep the same ones 
there as long as possible in order to 
gain the necessary power to get just 
consideration for the farmers' interests. 
Lastly, we must take with us an ap- 
preciation of the aesthetic side of farm 
life. The farmer must learn to appre- 
ciate the beauty of nature around him 
and learn to like good literature, espec- 
ially the poetry of our great nature 

poets. 

The farmer is "sot" and backward in 
bis ways, however. We must remem- 
ber this when our splendid ideas do not 
work out at once. We must have cour- 
age to be patient, for in the long run 
we can win out with our better ed- 
ucation. 



M Ji G V E T E — 



*t 



"Word Mongers'W 
"Chattering Barbers" 

"Word Tonecrs" and "chattering barbers," Gilbert called 
those of his predecessors who asserted that a wound made 
by a magnetized needle was painless that a magnet wdl 
attract silver, that the diamond will draw iron, tha the 
magnet thirsts and dies in the absence of iron, that a magnet, 
pulverized and taken with sweetened water, will cure, 
heaaaches and prevent fat. 

Before Gilbert died in 1603, he had done much to explain 
magnetism and electricity through experiment. He found 
that by hammering iron held in a magnetic meridian it can 
be magnetized. He discovered that the compass needle >3 
controlled by the earth's magnetism and that one magnet 
can remagnetize another that has lost its power. He noted 
the common electrical attraction of rubbed bodies, among 
them diamonds, as well as glass, crystals, and stones, and 
was the first to study electricity as a distinct iorce. 

"Not in books, but in things themselves, look for Know!- 
edge," he shouted. This man helped to revolutionize methods 
of thinking-helped to make electricity what ,t has become. 
His fellow men were little concerned with him and his ^expert- 
ments. "Will Queen Elizabeth marry— and whom? they 
were asking. 

Elizabeth's flirtations mean little td us. Gilbert s method 
means much. It is the method that has made modem 
electricity what it has become, the method which enabled 
the Research Laboratories of the General Electric Com- 
pany to discover new electrical principles now applied I in 
transmitting power for hundreds of miles, in lighting homes 
electrically, in aiding physicians with the X-rays, in freeing 
civilization from drudgery. 

Generalf|Elecftric 

(, t ncr*i off.ee Company »*««*»•*« 



QJ-b24-tl. B 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 1, 1922. 



No. 5 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT DRAWS aggie revue, dec. is, to THE ACC | E COMEBACK TELLS AS VARSITY 
BIG CROWDS AND SPIRIT vary some™, last year ^ ^ ^^ TQ A ^ ^^ 

Will IncludeTwo One-act Plays. Try- 
outs for Five Maleand One Female Whole Team Plays Gamely Against Odds in One of Hardest Contests so 

Part to be Held Very Soon. 



Thirty-two Meetings All Over Coun- 
try Reveal Live Enthusiasm 
of Alumni. 

Again World Aggie Night hai come 
and gone, and for the fourth time in us 
...any years the spirit ami loyalty of <IHb' in .evc.al respects fro... las. year's 

the M. A 

The Freshman ii.nnher this year will 



The Aggie Kevue, as a regular .Noeial 
UnlOB entertainment, will he held this 
MMOI on Friday. Dee. 16, and will 



C. Alumni for their Alma 
Mater has revealed itself stronger than 
ever. On las. I Saturday night , net. W, * «■!*■• !■ Ifcat tl will probably DO*. 

Aggie men gathered together in U dif- ' 
ferenl meetings all over the country 



and in several of its possesions to ob- 
serve this annual alumni festival. This 
nun.her, together with two postponed 
meetings, make* the total number for 
this year at least live more than la>i 
year, an enrol. raging and significant 
fact to the Alumni .Secretary and his 
MMetatot 

Meet ings were held for the first time 
in Jacksonville and Miami, Kla., Day- 
ton, Ohio, and Valley Station, Ky. 



a one-act hurles<|uc, written hy Stephen 
Harris '20 and published by Walter 
Baker Co. of Boston. Harris wrote the 
play In his senior year at High School. 
He has been appointed ehairu.au of the 
freshman committee, which will take 
charge of this act of the show. 

A committee headed by liob Fuller is 
preparing a musical number. There 
will also he two one-act plays pre- 
sented on the occasion under the a. is 
pices of the Roister Doisteis. Competi- 
tions for these plays are to be held soon 



Far of Season. Grayson and McGeoch Score. 



FOUR STRAIGHT WINS AND PERFECT SEASON'S RECORD TO DATE 



SEN. CHAMBERLAIN SPEAKS 

IN ASSEMBLY OCT. 26 



'The Power of the Citizen " Theodore 
Roosevelt As an Example 



With the exception of Jacksonville 

these meeting were conceived and all and are open to any of the three upper 

plans made by the alumni themselves, 



Five men and one girl are 



entirely irrespective of the alumni 
office. Their spontaneous enthusiasm 
made up entirely for any lack in 

numbers. 

Fjghl of the larger gatherings in this 
section of the country were attended by 
representatives from the college, who 
added much to the enthusiasm with the 
lirst-band information and Inspiration 
which they look from the campus here. 
The spirit of the meetings was by no 

means dampened by the lact that the 
Continued on page 8 



classes, 
needed. 

Time has witnessed numerous changes 
in the policy of t be Koister Doisters in 
connection with student vaudeville. 
The 1M1U vaudeville was of the frater- 
nity type, each fraternity staging an 
act. Obviously the fraternities could 
not give the same attention to individ- 
ual acts as could a more closely knit 
oiganizal ion. 

The next year, then, after a rather 
nnraccOMfttl siiident vaudeville, the 
I;. lister Doisters presented in February 
1931] the first Aggie Kevue, which was 
organized strictly on class lines, with 
both a faculty and a two-year not. 



NEW YORK ALUMNI CLUB 
TO CLEEBRATE STEVENS GAME *Ubo«i 

many 



Annual Meeting Planned for Nov. 11 

With Aggie Football Men 

as Guests. 



\va\s, it lasted considerably be- 
yond the desired length of lime. 

F'or lack of time, then, it has been de- 
cided to omit the faculty and two-year 
acts in t his seasons Aggie Kevue. (lass 
acts will also be omitted except that of 
the freshmen, as above stated. 



The New York M. A. C Club is to 
celebrate the Aggie- Stevens Tech game 

at Uoboken, N.J. on Not. 11, in a royal — " m ^^^ m ^ m ^~"~~~" 

manner. After the game, where Connie FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 
Worth is to lead the cheering section, jq gJVTTLE NEXT TUESDAY 

for the Club have invited him as their i 

gue8t)theineniberswillgoto' i 15eefslea;. ConCB Collins has announced that 
( ■harlieV'in the big city for a good , the fresl.man-sopho.nore football game 
"feed" and an old time sing. Prexy is i will take place next Tuesday. 1 In- 
to he there, and a noble gathering. .f probable lime is :i:iu but a definite an- 
alumnifromn.anv stales. nounce.nen. will be made in Chape 

The New York ( lub is one of the BM»1 The yearlings have a line team tins fall 
prominent in M. A. C. alumni allai.s. while the character of the sophomore 
and includes members from many slates, aggregation is as yet an u 
One meeting a year is held,(this one tity. However, the 
being the 37th) usually on World Aggie enough matched so it 
nighl.butthisyeartheNov.il meeting probable that there will be a I 
will supplant the usual one. 

The Club has been instrumental in 
securing the game with Stevens and, as 
this is the first time our team will play 
in the New York district, it should be 
of very general interest. 



"The Power of the Citizen" was the 
subject of Senator Ccoige D. Chamber- 
lain's talk before Assembly last Thurs- 
day. He chose the subject because 
Friday, Oct 27, was the birthday of a 
typical all-around citizen. Tboodor. 
UooM'velt, whose lite well illustrates 
the power for g I a citizen may have. 

Senator Chamberlain gave an account 
of Koosevell's life and showed that 
always Koosevelt was an energetic, 
high-minded citizen who feared noth- 
ing. He was told hy his f. lends that 

politico were dirty— be went Into them 

to clean them up. While he was still 
a young man. newspapers said of him, 
"Uoosevel! calls thing's by their right 
names. There is a big future open to 
such a man ' 

Koosevell had no cowardly caution, 
the curse of so many men in public 
life. He knew no lear, either of in- 
cur, ing I he disfavor of political bosses 
or of ending his political career. What 
he believed to be right he did. While 
he was President, be had to settle some 
very difficult questions the problems 
ol Cuba, the Philippine <|iiestion, the 
Panama Canal affair. Always he was 
lair. 

From his boyhood when he had to 
struggle to regain his health Koosevelt 
was a tighter. He was brimming over 
with life and energy, yet his mind was 
always open to suggestion, always sym- 
pathetic. 

Today there is a demand for fearless, 
energetic, persevering men,.nenof Roose- 
velt's type. Most of the trouble in our 
public life is due to the inactivity of 
lazy citizens. We are facing great 
problems today — problems of law and 
order, public health, the education of 
an ignorant population, the admission 
and care of immigrants. F'or the solu- 
tion of these problems we need wide- 
awake intelligent citizens. The stu- 
« dents at M. A. C. and at every olbei 

i„ college should fit themselves well for 

teams are evenly " ,.,.„. . ,, 

. , the responsibility of voting and should 



strive to make the United Slates the 



In a clean, hard-fought game the 
Mass Aggie g.idstcrs won their fourth 
consecutive victory on Alumni Field 
last Saturday , beating New Hampshire 
Statu 12- 10. 'I be game was close and 
the outcome problematical from begin- 
ing to end. All ten of the visitors' 

tallies were bunched iu the mil 

period, while Coach Core's chaiges 
scored In I he second and last quarters 
Itaukhart, former Dartmouth star and 

referee ol the i lest, characterized 

the Aggie team as "one of the games! 
small college aggregations thai I have 
ever seen". 

The fust period was taken up mostly 
with an exchange of punts in which 
Tiimey usually had the advantage. 
Kaeb team seemed to be taking the 
measure of its rival and trying to find 
out what plays would go. Just be- 
fore the close of the period P.eal tried 
a d.op kick from the 47-yard line but 
it tell short. 




the stock market when the sof 
up la disclosed. 

Dartmouth had a band of forty pieces 
in the Hanover section of the Harvard 
Stadium last Saturday. 



h's line- bestooantry In the world. 



TBO Sophomore class has challenged 
the Freshman class to a six-man rope- 
pull, to he held between the halves of 
the Bates game. 



Mason W. Ai.okk '2:1, Civih; 

In the second quarter Heal fumbled 
a punt and New Hampshire recovered 
on our fit-yard line. Hut the home 
team held them for downs and got the 
ball on piacl icjilly the same spot. 
Tumey punted and the hall was run 
back to the New Hampshire 45-yard 
mark, where they made first down 
through the line. On the next play the 
Northerners were thrown for a loss and 
(his was followed by a lo-yard penalty 
but, nothing daunied, they threw a 
forward pass 10 yards and ran it 10 
more for first down on I be 20-yard line. 
On third down they still had four to go 



> 

n 
S 

•9 






T 



The I^s g arhusetis^oilegian, Wednesday, No vember 1, 1921^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 1, 1922. 



ami another mixii|> uai..e<l them l»»l 
,„.«• yard more. However, Farmer 

dropped baek lotbe 25-yar.i nark and 
dropped o«w a Bald KOtJ t" r llmM ' 

po'mtH. 
(Hiiyson kteksd oft* to their 2<»-yar«l 



:l touchdown. Score: Mans. Aggte tt, 

\ ( . w Hampshire i«». Grajraoa k.ckd to 

the '20-yard line and tl.e hall was run 
,, :l , k to the M A New Hampshire 
kick was blo«k»d and ARftlt had the 
ballon the visitors" :55yaul line. Seal 



.----• <v?r:. o e?e.d^ 

, b . next ,>lay a vtaltio. hack ... > >' tQ Sew , lalll pshire. 



around the tod «> •1«' w,,m1 ' iml ""' 

away with no one helween him and the 
goal hut ".Mminie- Ileal. He |Ol away 



S0«»rdta»d uiven to New Hampshire. 

On second down I bay had alffcl to fo 

and on third down. h-V bad three, bul 

Grajaon broka through and iloppad 

J • ■ II ,.»».,! . I ,...11 



and cussed foal Hoa bat '■^I^T^ "iTowardloaa. Baraapoa 

( .„ased him outside and the hall was them for 



brought hack to tbe 86-yard line. New 

M;llll ,.shilclhen pushed dOWB the held 
„, tllt . 8-yard mark for another lust 
down ami on the tollowinji play Crossed 

l!l( . || M foTa touchdown by Goetafaoo. 

Farmer kicked the goal. Score: New 
Hampshire 10, Mass. AggiaQ. 

T | lt . visitors kicked to the 20-y:ird 
li,„. and Heal, with wonderful inter- 
„.,,.,„.,., ,.;,„ j, l.ack thirty yards. Cap- 
tain GraysOB made lirst down through 
,,„. Iim .. |he hall was rushed seven 
more yards in four tries and T.in.ey 
kicked'idlside on I he < Iranile's "iO-yard 
line. The visitors returned the punt at 
once to Baal on his sixth ehalkmark, 
and he ran it out to the 40-yard line. 
M.-t'eo.h made live yards throne. h the 
opposing line hut the next play struck 
a stone wall for BO gala. Tumey then 
kicked to the 40-yard mark whe.e New 
Hampshire tumbled and the hall was 
smothered in maroon jeis.ys. Grayson 
earned the ball for BO gala and another 
aliempt was also stopped. Tumey 

■ad* eight yards aod the visitors were 

penalized 1 :. more, ghrtUB; „s lirst down. 

Mcticoch in -.liaiely 'allied the pig- 

skin over for the Brsl \ --ie touchdown. 
Score: New Hampshire 10, Mass. IgglC 
tJ. The period emle.l with an i.ieoi.i- 
plete.l forward |>a-- 

(Wavson kicked off, opting the sec- 
ond half, ami the hall was run hack 10 
yanlsloihe (..anile State 40-yard line. 
Here the "Agatee" "•<• '▼' 1 ''' 1 another 
fumhleand (..ayson wenl through the 

Hoe f tt ra Ural dow«. Nuu Hampshire 

received the hall on downs ami kicked 

to Baal on bteSX-yard Haw. Two plays 

U ave BOadTBBlagB and Tumey punled 
tOtba visit.. is' sixth chalk line. Here 
Atmie ic.ov.ied another fumble only to 
have the hall eo back to the visitors on 
account of offsides. HottOf biokfl 
through the opposing line ami ma.le a 
tackle, New Hampshire K »infof noth- 
ing. They then kicked to Heal on his 
lio-yard line and he ran it out to his 4", 
yard mark. 

around left end for 10 yards and Heal 
followed with a t.-yard uain through 
Ike Hue. On (be next play he threw a 
pretty forward, but it was fumbled 
after'heing caught and New Hampshire 
recovered it. They kicked to Heal on 
bis 32-yard mark and he carried it back 
to the ninth line. Tumey carried the 
ball around left end and <*raysoii made 
live yards more. First down was made 
on a fake drop-kick. Heal made live 
yards through the line and then missed 
a drop-kick. New Hampshire tried the 
line twice with no success and then 
punted to Ileal who was dropped in his 
tracks on the 4r»-yard line. Tumey was 
thrown for a two-yard loss and then 
kicked to tbeOraBlta Staters" '20-yard 
mark where Myrick recovered a fum- 
ble. Thequartei en. led with the score 
still 100 in favor of the visitors. 

in the last period Grayson started off 
by ...akin- seven yards through the 
line, and then recovered a fumble. He 
followed up by making first down on 
the f.ve-vard line. Then followed "sec- 
ond down three to go," and "third 
down two to go" and finally "Cap' Ba- 
ishedit upbycarrynigtheballoverfor 



I lie i>> "■• ' 

they kicked to Heal on bis 43-yard line 
and he ran it hack four yards. Line 
tackles did not gain and Tumey kicked 
,„ the visitors' 18-yard line where the 
,,j„skin rolled out of bounds. 1 wo 
more kicks tollowed in rapid success,.,.. 

.,,„! fl D »ll, Tumey intercepted a to- 
ward pass and rani, baek HO yards... 

tUeM-y.rdm.tk. He then kicked to 

,,,e visitors' 20 and the ball was hroiiuht 
baek to tbe SS-yaid line when the final 
whistle hbw 



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hoe Store 



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"Reasonable m dollars and sense" 
A W- HIGGINS. INC.. South D EE Rn E LO. Ma** 



2 

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10 



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fl-12 

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Mass. Aggtaa. ° 

New Hampshire, 

Touchdowns Gr*yaoa,lIe€foooli t Gui 

,afso„. (ioalaf.cr.ouch.lown Farmer 
lioal from Held - Fanner. Keteree- 

Benkbart of Dertmontb. Umpire-Car- 

peotcrof Worcestei lech. I.inesman- 
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periods. Substitutions-Mass. Agg>« 
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steams. Heard.... for l'a.rick, Cut ler tor 
Wet worth. 



f>rp<ivUr & /Aorehoust, 
PROTEUS. 



No i, Cook Place. 



Amherst. Mas* 



Kodaks and 



DR. J. K. SHAW WRITES FOR 
"THE COUNTRY GENTLEMAN" 

In the Cxmtni Qe*Um&* for Oct. II 

is an article by Dr. . I. K. Shaw of the 

F.xperi.uent Station, entitled "Dateet- 

(i ,,e ran i, out to n.s ..- !a 8 the Misnamed A ^ppb. T*~' » 

Pu.nev carried the ball summarizes the results of ses... eai> 

■ of study in applying the pru.cples of 
| K „any to the determination of vanet.es 
ot Bpp ig nees. Dr. Shaw's work is ot 
tremendous importance to all po.nolo- 
riatl and is certain to save large sums ot 
money to fruit-growers. It permits the 
idem ilication of a yon..- apple. ree by 
its taxonomical features, years before 
jteoiild be identified by its fruit. 

The system is based on cm pansone 
of the bark, particularly the lentieels, 
and examination of the single leaves of 
the current season's growth. The leaves 
furnish a very definite clue to the va- 
riety since each variety differs from 
other varieties in si/.e. outline, shape 
and edge serrations ot its leaves. 

A practical svst en. of certification .-t 
varieties has been worked ...it by the 
Massachusetts Fruit Glowers' Associa- 
tion ruder the auspices of the associ- 
ation a representative of the Massachu- 
setts Fxperin.en. Station examines trees 
i„ the late su.nme.oi early fall, and to 
tl.ose which are found true to name M 
attached I lead seal bearing a special 
stamp Tins seal proves that the tree 
is certified as of a particular variety b.V 

the association. 



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At Deuel's 



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Velox and Azo Paper, 

Flash Sheets and Flash Powders for Interior Work, 

Developing, Printing and Enlarging by Experti. 

Deuel's Drug Store 

Victor Records 

twice a month. 

!deuei/s Drug Store 



Freshmen: 

In order to have a complete record of the brief years at Aggie, you should start an M-Book at once. Watch it grow 
until it becomes the most highly treasured chapter in the history of your life. We have something new to offer in this 
line— something that you should not fail to see before making a purchase. There's a book for every pocket-book. 



i 



INN 



JOHN S. HALE PRESIDENT 

OF POMOLOGY CLUB 

The Pomology (luh held its lirsi 
meeting of the year in Wilder Hall on 
Wednesday, Oet. 25. Refreshments 
were served anil ollicers elected as fol- 
lows: President. John S. Male of (Jlas 
tonhury, Conn. ; vice-president, Alfred 
F. Qay <>f (irolon; secretary, Howard l>. 
(iordoii of Ipswich; treasurer, (Jilhert 
H. Irish of Turner, Me. It was agreed 
(hat the date of the next neetiaf woald 
he announced in the near future. 



WAUGH-GILLETTE 

The campus was the scene, lust Sat- 
urday evening, of a pretty home wed- 
ding when Miss Ksther Waugh, daugh- 
i.iof Prof. Frank A. Waugh, and Na- 
than W. (iil let te '18 were married in 
(he home of the bride. Mrs. (Jillette is 
a graduate of Kansas Male Agricul- 
tural College in the class of '22 and a 
member of I'll i Kappa I'hi and Kappa 
Delia. The groom graduated from 
M. A. C. with the class of '21. He en- 
tered in t he class of 'IH tiud served two 
years in the World War. He is a inem- 
baf of the (J. T. V. fraternity. After a 
wedding trip the tiilletles will he al 
home after Dec. 1 in I,ynnlield (enter. 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Ammtour Developing and Printing 

Hills Studio -Phone 456-R 

WEBSTER'S STDDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



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in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 
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INConi-OKATKI) 

27S-flB High St., Holyoke 

Tel. WS2 WS3 



The Best in 
Drug Store Merchandise 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Re m mil Storm 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

n and Cigarettes— Special pi Ice per carton 
on Cigarettes. 
- Iiratrt's Chocolates and other leadinu lines. 
Cracker* and Canned Goods 



BATES ELEVEN EXPECTED 

TO GIVE VARSITY GOOD GAME 



Saturday to See Last Home Game 
of Season, Against Strong Visitors. 

The Mass. Aggie gli.lsters will appeal- 
in action on the campus for the lust 
time this season next Natur.la> in the 
till with Hates. All of the authorities 
when interviewed bj our reporter! w.ie 
expecting a hard game. 

Co '.< II "Em" tiUAYSON : 

"1 saw BowdoiB soundly trim Amheisi. 
They were rated as the Maine champions 
again l his season. lint along comes 
Bates and trims them last .Saturday. 
That means that we will have aiiot her 
hard game this weekend." 

Coach "Kid" Qobi : 

"Bales is coached hy Oliver Cutis, ;in 
;ill-Ainerican Harvard player 80 yean 
hack, and hy VViggin, one of the hest 
harks Bates ever had and a Colgate- 
trained player. The couilination ot 
these two styles should he effective." 
Cm-tai.n "DAMS" (hsavhon: 

"We BIB playing e;ich game as it 
comes. Biites will uu.louhle.il y give u 
a good rub." 

Vk.ti i:a\ Ta. ki.k "Bon*' Moiioi;: 
"The Bales game gives us another 

creek a) ■ Harvard eoaehed team. 

Thai" s what we*ic titter." 
ADY1BOR1 ( OAOH '" Vi< ' Bt. i : 

"Bates will be heavier ibaa our hoys. 

they have I good overhead game, and 
are a scrappy hunch. The vaisiiy will 
have to hustle to keep its record.*' 

The team has been crippled in the 
New Hampshire game and the following 
men :ue reporting to practice in cits: 
Salman, Sargent, Kerranli, Pierce, 

Crosby aedNowara. The probable Hoe- 

ups are: Mass. Aggie le Maishman, 
It Salman, Ig Mu.lgett or Myrick, c 
Alger, rg Nowers. rl Mohor, re r'erranli 
or Sargent, qb Beal. Ibb Tumey, rbb 
(jrayson, fh McCeoch or Barrows. For 
Bates re Howe, rl Scott, rg I'elelsoli. 
<• Price, Ig Asl'a-ian. It t'uiney, In Tar- 
hell, <|l> Moiilton, rbb Woodman, Ibb 
Fellows, fh Davis. 



DR. JOEL E. GOLDTHWAIT 

IN TOMORROW'S ASSEMBLY 

Doctor Joel K. Gold th WBit ot Boston 

will speak at the Thursday Assembly, 
He graduated from M. A. C. In 1886 and 

from Harvard Medical School in 1890 
with the degree of M. D. Since thai 
lime he litis been practicing in Boston 
almost Constantly. He is now insuii. lot 
Of orthopaedic suigery at Harvard Med- 
ical School and is recognised through- 
out Ihe country as a leader in his line 
of work. He has been president ot the 
American Orthopaedic Association and 

is a (request con trt outer of articles on 

orthopaedic surgery. 
Dr. Goldthwait was one of the more 

prominent M. A. C. men in the pasi 
war. He was eomuiesioBed as Major 
in the 2nd Orthopaedic I'nil of the Med- 
ical Depart incut , and was with the A. 
E. F. for the two years preceding March, 
1919, He was promoted lo the rank of 
Colonel in 1919 and received two cita- 
tions from the British. 



FRESHMAN ELEVEN LOSES TO 
ROSARY HIGH IN H0LY0KE 



Team Expected to Make Oood Show- 
ing Against Deerfield Saturday. 

Fighting pluckily and steadily 
throughout the game, Ihe Freshman 
eleven went down to defeat, 14*0, bet. .le 
ihe Bosarj High School football team 
in the second game on the yearling 
schedule. The game was played al 
Holy oke last Saturday . Bosary Started 

a drive lata 1b the Bret period and bj 

means ol line open-liel.l running by Me 

Nuiiy, quarterback, brought the ball to 

the Freshman 17 yard line. A I Ihe 
start of ihe second period McNulty 

sc, <| for Rosary by an end run ami 
kicked tbe goal. Tbe remainder oi lbs 

half consisted of rough and rather poor 

football. 

in the second half (iraysoii fumbled a 
Bosary kick on the Freshman 10 y aid 
line. The ball rolled over (he goal and 

Cauley fell upon it lor the second Bos 

ny touchdown. McNulty kicked (lo- 
gon I. 

In Ihe latter pari of the half the 
Freshmen kept the bail in Bosaiy's 
territory but did not succeed In scoring, 
The game ended with Ihe ballon Bos- 
aiy's 8-yard line. 

Qavln and Jones on I he line and Qus> 
latson and White la the baeklield were 

the Individual iters in tin- Freshman 

lineup. McNul'y starred for Bosary, 

Coach Collins looks forward lo a sin- 
cessful season and reports that I he 
Itawe showed thai the Freshmen had 

developed materially sine.- ihe hist 

game, si though ihe two scores would 
not seem to indicate I his. 

Next Saturday the. Fieshmen play 
Deerlielil at Deelliel.l with .sseiilially 
I be same lineup. 

The lineup : 

If. \. < . FltKSIIMI.N BOBABI HlOII 

Sbe.l.l, re le. By an 

Jones, rl It, Hick. \ 

(J.'ivin, rg Ig, Ma u nix 

McKay. .- e, 0' Donne! I 

TburloW, Ig rg, Kennedy 

Tulenko, it rt, Doodj 

Buckley, le re. Shea 

Cotihig, qb qb, McNulty 

c.ustafson, rbb Ibb, fcfefft ron 

' .i ay sun. Ibb rbb, Cauley 

\\ bite, ib fh, Latbrop 



FACULTY OF FIVE COLLEGES 

IN CONFERENCE AT H0LY0KE 

\ eonfreenee of delegates from Am- 
heisi, Williams. Ml. Ilolyoke, Smilh 
and Massachusetts Agricultural College 

waa held Saturday .Oct 2h in the Second 
Congregational 'lunch of Bolyoke. 

Some bundle. I delegates were present, 

Presides! Botterfield and 18 members of 
our faculty attended. Tbe conference 

was called lo consider the tads regard- 
ing col lege moi als. to consider the re- 
ligion Of college slll.lelils. audi, (dis- 
cuss tbe practical problem of improving 
college assemblies. 

Three teminara were held, one led by 
Dr. Sparry of A ndover, another led by 
Dr. Lyman of Princeton, and the third 

by Dean Brown of Vale 




With tut a •Scotch Mist, life's 
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smile, rain or shine. 

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vr overcoat* «> ri«A Scottish rhi viott rain 

iironi . 

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Man's Half Hole*. Rubber Meets . . . $1.75 
Men's Rubber Soles Robber If eeln . $2.25 
Men's Half Boles $1.35 

Bforfc Oaarasteee— AMHKRST HOI -1 

IT'S A HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

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Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
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The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 1, 1912. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 1, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

PubltBhed every Wednesday by the 
Students of the MaHHaehuaetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Ikmno W. RUM "i» EdltoMn-riilef 

I , ran B. Ajwiwmwli Managing Kdltor 

JOBS Q. It A..-V4 Ass^t Man's MM 

1>I.|- AIM MKNT II K.M'S: 



Kilitorlal. 

Atlllftl- H, 

Acaileini' x, 

Campoa, 



IBVINO W. Si M'i: ■» 

A i limn' I WAI <■" '24 

|.k\n i« H. Kicn II '-' r > 

l.i i in i: I!. 4HBWOTOJI "■ 

.l< >n v (i. Mr. \l' -4 

CNASLSS K. OI.INKK. .III. 'V< 

Rem M. WOOD ft 

I.. KlIASniH Kknm i>v *M 

John M. Wiiittibk '28 



Faculty. 
Alumni. 
Two- Year. 
KmIiiiiil'i' M4 
(oiiitniinieatioiis. Svi I. < oHKN II 



BUSINBHB DKPARTMKNT. 

Owkn K. Foi.ao*i f*l BWfaMM Manager 

BoaBBfl K. Stf.k.kk. "24 Advertising Manager 
( i.ikkoki. I.. ItaioKN "24 Orrnlatlon Manager 
DoHAI.il W. I. km is "2i 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 centa. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at ••cond-claM matter at the A inherit 
Post Offire. Accented for mailing at special 
rate of pottage provideil for In section 110S, Art 
of October, 191" authorized Augutt 20. 1918. 



fellow men is not our mark, bat Rtdlnfl 
and doing good, to those less fortunate 

llian OOnalVM 'ik our ideal, I lien lO ful- 
lill ,.ur aim is lO win. Some day we 
may Ml IBS BttglisR idea oi sport, the 
mutual physical l.enelil of all those 

engaged, hut we eennol <!<> tins except 

byteaeblOg tb« chiidieu al the very 
slarl of life. 

It is true that athletic* are carried to 
neediest extremes in certain directions. 
To give precedence to a miiHK meeting 
over a Glee Club rehearsal is wrong. 
The small group of men engaged in IDS 
rehearsal can do much more for Ibfl 

college i>y their efforts toward greater 
excellence In singing than by mingling 
their cheers with those sneonmglng 
ihe foot hall team. The frenzied 
speaker who declares that everyone 
who fails to go out on the football held 
is "yellow" is totally misguided and 
woefully weak in his ratiocinations. 
The academics ate just as important in 
their Held as athletics in theirs. The 

attempts of some athletes In the acade- 
mic activities would be just as ludi- 
crous and pal be tie as woo Id bs the at- 
tempts of some academites in the athle- 
tic activities. The remedy is greater 
consideration tor the habils of others 
and perhaps an appeal to the legisla- 
ture for more money for general athle- 
tics. 



ELABORATE PLANS FOR 
FLOWER SHOW NOV. 10, 11,12 



Less Radical. 



SENIOR AND JUNIOR TWO-YEAR 
MEN ELECT CLASS OFFICERS 



Richard Newell New President of 
Floriculture Club. 

The Floriculture Show is to be held 

November 10, II, nod IS. II will occupy 

three rooms In French Hall, ll is lo be 
held iii cooperation with the llolyoke 

and Northampton Gardeners' Clob, 

whose exhibits will occupy one of I he 
rooms. Members of the flub and M. 

4. c. students will eompets for prizes 

separately. Judges of the exhiliils will 

he Harold Keyes, George W. Tnornlley, 

and fail .1. Norton. The Senior Flori- 
ciillurc (lass will display table decora- 
lions; (he Junior (lass, bOOUUetl ami 
glass** of cul llowers; the Two-Year 
Piorlcoltore (lass, baskets of cul 

Sowers; the Two Year Class In Green- 
bouse Management, baskets of polled 
plants. Kxhibits of chrysanl hemums 
will form a large pari of ihe show. 

A business meeting of the Floricul- 
ture flub was held October 2-1. Olliceis 

sleeted for the following year are: Pres- 
ident, Richard C. Newell of West Spring- 
field; vice-president, Aimce S. Gelgel 

of Pepperell; secretary end treasurer, 

RogerS. Minneiof Maiden; soeial com- 
mittee, in/.a A. Boles of Dorchester, 
Runles M. Avails of Fall River, and 

Aimce B. Qeiger. Flans were made tor 
the coining Floriculture Show and 

decorating and advertising committees 

were chosen. 



Town Hall, Amherst 
Thursday 



Mat. 3. KVS. 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 



Mat 3. gve. 
1-45.8-30 



Owen Moore. Nita Naldi 
and Pauline Garon In "Re- 
ported Muting" in * resls. 
The greatest eomedi drama 
of the screen. 



Newt 



Comedy 



Saturday 



.Mat. 3, K\e. 
6-45.8-30 



Monday 



Mat. 3. gve 

6-45 8-30 



Another linnert Hushes 
story "The Wall Flower" 
» ii liColleen Moore andRich- 
ard Dix. Full of Ihe comedy 
and human appeal that made 
Hashes' "Dangerous Curve 
Ahead" and "Old Neat" ,w " 
of fllmdom't bis soc c e a e ea . 

Sport Review, ^Taking the 

JHsre 

Ben Turpin in "Home- 
j made Movi es." 

I Agnes Ayret. Hilton Silli 
1 a d Cation Ferguson in 
"Borderland." Fanciful, 
different, dramatic, possess 
inn two separate plots and 
iwo sets of characters. 
News 

Buiter Keaton in .... 
"My Wife's Relation" 

Bebe Daniels and Jack Holt 
in "North of the RioGrand" 

a Wasters stm.\ foil of baa* 

M and loinani •«'. 

Round 1 of "The Leather 
Pushers." Snapshots 



College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, H. A. C. 



Does M. A. f. mean Massachusetts 
Athletic Camp as ■ writer in the 
Alumni llitlh'thi seems to imply ? The 
Student body says "no." Of course 
athletics play an Important part in the 

student activities, the most Importnnt 

part Infect, but any M. A. C. athlete 

will testify thai became to his college 
to study, to become acquainted with 
some phase of agriculture ass vocation, 

When he arrived in Amherst he found 
a means to give vent t<i his 8X0001 ener- 
gy through the football l» am, the 
basketball team. Ihe baseball team. 
Whs these three teams and not tennis, 
track, soccer, and a few others'.' First 
and foremost we cannot afford to support 
them according to the presenl financial 

system. How much more would it 
toko to outfit Ihe whole college group 
in a safe and satisfactory manner? 
Where would the money come from'.' 
Who would hire BttOUgfa physical di- 
rectors lo lake care of the total num- 
ber'.' This raises I be vital question 
"Has the w tiler in ihe Alumni Mullet in 
attacked Ihe problem at the right 
point?" 

Furthermore. I here are not sufficient 
Students interested in athletics to 
make up a do/en teams. The presenl 

major sports are habitually calling tor 

more men. more men, and finally must 
go through the season handicapped be- 
cause of lack of material. Every stu- 
dent does not want to play football, to 
run around a cinder track, to stop a 
hard rubber puck at the cage. Most 
students enjoy watching their selected 
group of athletes, cheering them on, 
ami gloating over their successes. 

Who says we do not play In any 
sport to win or at least lo play the 
came squarely? Bear since we were 
old enough to hold a hat, we have at- 
tempted lo defeat the North End fel- 
lows, we have found satisfaction in get- 
tinjj bigher marks in Studies, we have 
admired the success of Henry Ford. To 
win by fair means has been our aim 
through life. If outstripping our 



Paul Swanson Elected to Head Stu- 
dent Council 



COLLEGIAN BOARD TO LABOR 
UNDER DIFFERENT SYSTEM 



Hair Bobbing 

Facial Massage 

Head Treatment 



During the last week both Senior and 
Junior classes of Ihe Iwo-ycar course 
have had meetings :»nd elected 1 heir 
class ollirers for the term. The Seniors 

electee! John Armstrong, president, 

Everett Woodward, vice-president, 

Beatrice Kleyla, secretary, and Paul 

Swanson, treasurer. The Junior class 

officers are. president, Everett Miller, 
secretary, Dorothy Haskell, and trees* 

urer, Allerlon Johnstone. 

Elections lo the Student Council were 
also held, seven Senior members, and 
four Junior, making up the total mem- 
bership. The Senior members Include 
Theodore Emerson, William Kllioti, 

John Armstrong, Raymond Potter, 

Alton Adams, Harold Westcrvell. and 
1'aul Swanson, while the Junior group 
is composed of Allerton Johnstone, 

Everett Miller. Arthur Briggs, and 

Franklin l'addock The Council held 

their first meeting for organising this 

week, and elected as officers 1'aul 
Swanson, president, John Armstrong, 
vice president, and Everett Miller, 
secretary. The two men selected as 
ihe Executive Committee are Harold 
Westervell and Arthur Briggn. 



II. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 
Eevrything All "Write" Here 



COMPETITION FOR SQUIB TO 

CONTINUE ALL OF TERM 

A competition for the Setrio'ts now la 

progress, and will last all through the 
tirst term. A large number of Fiesh- 
men have signified their intention of 
entering this competition, but the 
hoard would like to see a slill greater 
number out. 

There is also an opportunity for upper 
classmen to compete for the board. 

Any new men interested in entering 
the contest for the business, art or lit- 
erary departments see Wealherwax, 
Xoyes or Urunner respectively. The 
first number of this year's St/uib will 
probably appear about Xov. 20. and 
promises to be the best yet. 



Co-operation oi Campus Asked for 
Betterment of Paper and Assist- 
ance of Board. 

With Ibis issue of ihe < ou.i oi \x Ihe 

board is adopting a somen but differeni 
system ol news-gat boring, which affects 

the Sophomore competitors for the 
hoard as well as the regular members. 
On the editorial page will be found a 

new list of the beads of ihe eight de- 
partments wbicb have been designated 

lo scour the campus for news. Il will 
help Ihe board maleiialh in 'heir work 
if anyone having news to be printed in 
the Coi.i.koian will notify the head of 
his respective depaitinent on or before 
Sunday night. 

The competitors will enjoy some ad- 
vantages trout this new system as well. 
ll is planned lo have each competitor 
serve in several departments, each for a 
certain length of time, during his com- 
petitive period. This will do away with 
the old credit system (one credit for 
each six inches of [printed matter), and 
give the competitors more chance for 
individual work, with the stress on 
quality rather than quantity. 

There are five Sophomores signed up 
for the competition at the present 
time, as follows: F.mil J.Corwin.feoige 
L. Church, John W. Hyde, Emily Q. 
Smith, and Cordon 11. Ward. There is 
plenty of time for any others wishing lo 
irv out before ihe end of the lerm. 




The nominating committee of the 
Junior class held a meeting last Wed- 
nesday evening at Phi Sigma Kappa 
house. 



no matter whai you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the otlice, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 

stationery Supplies in any quantity. 

For your wriiiug-desk we have Letter 

Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Plotters, pens. 

Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc. 
Every article is warranted, ami our 
j. rices are as low as yon will find any- 
where. We should be Rind to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC P. POCK, Northampton 

How to set acquainted— 

Attend a clnli nisht dance. 

Every other Wednesday, starting Oct. 25th 

Kn.iiiviilile e\ antng "pent with con- 
genial roans people guaranteed. 

Every FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Beginning Sept. 29th. 

Popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone T«l Northampton 



CbompsoiTs Omclp Calks 

You fellows who are still pterins golf ami 
tennis should take advantage of the km prices 

on our coif and tennis balls. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order • $35.00 to $45.00 

Raincoat* 
Baits Frew Mllltar> Tailoring 




BURBERRY OVERCOATS 

ff m \\\iSli imported ciiuIn liuvt* u Niibfle cli*4f inrtiveiiess rcroguiV.<><l 

\i^ bjr miyonc who knows Noiiiething uhoul ■perl 0iid fiiNbion. 

Barberry oMMlelr turn origimil and exclusive. L»»t "TOM" 

help you Into one of tbeee exclusive eoeie. Then ON TO TUFTS) 

in perfect comfort! More than u Touuery — 

A College* Institution. 




FORTY-FIVE COUPLES MAKE 
FIRST INFORMAL A SUCCESS 

The first informal of the year VM 
held niter the New Hampshire game 

last Saturday. Mole than forty-live 
couples al tended, making il one of Ihe 
most successful lirst term social dances 
evei held. Puncheon was served in a 

garden of palms In the lower ball bj a 

caterer. Kxcellcnl music for danoine 
was furnished l>y a local orchestra eoh- 
-isi i ii « of Dunliar, Woodworlh, Parker, 
and Swill. The chaperon from Ml. 
llolyoke was Mrs. da >f tin- Moun- 
tain View House. Miss Ptlmsn of ihe 

(iradnate House was the chaperon from 
Smith. 

The next informal will be held some 
lime between Thanksgiving and Christ- 
inas. The new reduced I ale* will hold 
good lor t he next dance. 



OVER ADAMS' DH^fi STOUK 



OUTLINE OF DISCUSSIONS TO 
BE LED SOON BY MR. WARD 

Beginning Thursday, Nov. 2, al 3-80 
p. m.. in Memorial Hall, Mr. Ward will 

continue the discussion •.■roups helil 
last year, 'lhis term and nexl he hopes 

lowoik ihrottejb Ihe geld of "The i>< 
velopnteul of tteligion among Mankind, 
and a Comparative Btudj of ihe Relig- 
ions of I he Wnl Id." 

Beginning with a discussion as to 

what religion is, the group will examine 
iis most primitive phase*, as evidenced 
in Ausiralia. Melanesia, eic . etc. 

They will I hen pass lo ihe later de- 
velopment ol belief in I. oils, r'etiehes, 
Amulets, (.hosts. MSgiC etc. ele. 

bother will eome to nn examination 

ol (he Kelalion of Boliglofl toother 
tinman activities, e. g., animism. Mot 
. ait, and pla\ . 
Next the Kvolution of Deities, sere- 
inonials. sacrifice and prayer Will lie dia- 
led. 
A night will then he given lo each of 
the higher forms : 
Brahmin tern. 

Buddhism. 
The Religion of (Jreece and Home. 
Judaism. 

A sclent and Mediaeval. 
Christianity. 
Modem Christianity. 

Pasalag finally to ihe more personal 

aipeeta of the subject, If the weeks 

allow. 
The groups are open to all M. A. 
■tndents, whether men or women. 
So outside study is expected. The 
meeting lasts one hour. Should sufficient 
-udents signify their intention, a see- 
group may he formed at another 
tiine. Any wish expressed in connection 
with the above, left at Mr. Ilauna's 
e, will be carefully considered, 

NURSERY COURSE TO BE 

CONTINUED THIS WINTER 

Professor Frank A. WaogB has ar- 

ged a course for nurserymen to be 

liven as pari of the Ten Weeks' School 

me. ll will he yiven in cooperation 

i the New England Nurteryraen'i 

notation assisted by the Stale Nurs- 

\ -social ions of Connecticut and 
macbttsetts. A similar course gives 
lent year was very successful. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

\i Assembly last Thursday, Presi- 
dent liiillerlield explained Ihe methods 

of absentee votlug. Men of voting aye 

who follow these methods will not ha\e 
to no home lo cast their ballot a. 

Onlv 11 men were present at the hand 

rehearsal Oct. -•">. ll more ll. ell do Hot 
al lend rehearsals il will be Impossible 
tor I he hand lo play at the game wilh 

Tufts. 

Ne.M Friday Si chapel, Dr. Paul Har- 
rison who has been serving si s medi- 
cal missionaiy in Arabia will speak on 
"International I'l iemlship " He will 

remain ai M. v. U. during the daj lo 
talk nil b students who desire personal 

Conlclrli, 

New Senate Rulings. 
I n order I hat men w ho must he alisenl 

from Assembly foi loot bell practice oi 
work connected with athletics may 
vote tor vnrioui officers elected by the 

student body, the Senate lias voted that 

bnllots for such men be given to the 
managers ol learns. Tbej will tbeu 
distribute them. Ballots must be se 

Cured and Voting done on Ihe day on 

which ihe regular elect ion occurs. 

In all class Rctlvit lee and contents gov- 
erned by the Benate, the participant! 

nnisi take pari as members ol tbe class 
iu whicb the] are enrolled si Ibe dean's 
office. This means no 1U2H man ma> 
lake pari in a pond party, whether or 
not be st tended Ibis college previously, 
except as a Preshmen. 

Index Note. 
W. \V. Wood. '24. lias been chosen 

photographic editor ol the 1084 Index. 

to till ihe vacancy left l>> Flisha l.liss. 

•ji.who das transfer red lo Columbia 
University . 

Menorah Society. 

Miss .Inlliel ta Kahn ol New York, 
Who is ma kino a hon ol ihe count ry in 
the Interesl ol the Menorah Society, 
spoke to i in- members of (he local 

society in .Memorial Hall last Thursday 

evening, In her brief talk Miss Kahn 

told of the origin, purpose and function 
Of the society. From Ainhersi Miss 
Kahn left for the middle west where 
she will give similar lectures lo the 

Menorah Societies of tbe various col- 
li! t hat pari of t be country. 
The men chosen lo speak before the 

Menorah Society lhis term are Harvard 
students. Thev are: Harry Siarr, to 
speak on Nov. 15, and A. A. Boback lo 

speak on Dec. HI. 



TWO-YEAR RUSHING SEASON 
ENDED LAST WEDNESDAY 



Sixty-eight Men are Pledged to the 
Two Clubs. 

The rushing season ol Ibe two-year 

men ended last Wednesday at noon, 
and the two clubs have taken in 

nearly sn equul number of pledgee. 

The Kolony ( luh pledged a total of 
H men. Including 8 seniors and 2~> 
freshmen, and A. T. (;.. the other club, 
took In a delegation of 15 seniors and 

20 freshmen. Richard Case of Win- 
chester. Mass.. and Alton Adams of 

Bmttleboro, Vt.. are the respective 
presidents of the two clubs. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optloldii mill Jo\v««l,i- 

9 Fteessat sneet (aa one night'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Hen Alarm (locks anil other Itclialilc Makes 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

•ELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prteee. 
Informal* m Specially 

Ugo, P ros pec t si., as riieist . Mass 

Tml. 6BB-M 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pail 



I 



— on- 



Pine Groceries 
Canoies and F Kl'IIS 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning: and Dyeing 

Rat row pressing ticket finwH flesisas'll 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

seeesssn SXtaes. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Home Bro*. Mmakwmmr 

Older yipiir BCXl Snll or l>\crci>ut here now. 
Ilesi seleelions nf Woolens in the latest |>at 
Iciiim always oa hand. The hiiih < | tin 1 1 1 \ of 0111 
Hoik is appaieiit on fan< > u'ai iiienls 1 1 1 us! 

LABROVITZ 

Tnilor and Habrrdaiher. 
il Amityst. Ncvi t<. Wasters UahwTel.fMlee 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 

THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



THE 

AMHERST MASQUEES 

-WILL PRESENT 

THE SUN-Galsworthy 

SWEEPS OF ^S-Masefield 

BROTHERS— Beach 
COLLEGE HALL, AMHERST 

FRIDAY, NOV. 3. 8-00 P. M. Admission 50c 

No Seats Reserved. 
Tickets on sale at College Drug Store and Students' Activity Office. 



See your team as others see it 

f>y reading the Spurting Pages 

of the 

Boston Evening Transcript 



I 



^Thirlttassactnisem C o ll e gian, W ^dflgs day , Nove m ber 1 . I J2L 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday. Novt»ttiher 1. 1922. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And othtr feel thing* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 415-W) lladley. Mass 



— TKY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for tirst-clans 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

U Pleasant Si., Amherst . Mass. 





© B . K.& Co 



A Victory for Skill 

Once or twice a team can win by 
luck. But it takes stamina and courage 
and endurance to remain at the toJ> all 
the time. 

KUPPENHEIMER 
GOOD CLOTHES 

have mounted in f>ubic esteem because 
they are the finest product of tailoring 
art and designing skill. 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block. 

Let us fit you out for the Game and Dance, Saturday. 



FRUIT JUDGING AND PACKING 
TEAMS GO TO NASHUA NOV. 9 

The Fruit Judging Team will ffO to 
Nashua, N. II. <>■> Nov. Mill to take part 
In a -Fruit Judging Contest to be held 
in connection with the New Hampshire 
Mate Horticultural Society. They will 
have for competitors teams from all the 
other New England States with the ex- 
ception of Maine. The Tacking Team 
will go to Nashua at the same lime 
and take part in a packing contest. 
Coach B. I). Drain has not as yet chosen 
the teams, hut it is understood that the 
Judging Team of three will he selected 
from the following group: H. Baker. II. 
Hates. Mary (iildemeister, Gilbert 
Irish, Wilbur Marshinan, f. C Scais, 
and It. C Wendell. The Judging 
Team will also lake part in another 
contest to he held at the Pennsylvania 
State College on December H and i». 
Among their prob aide competitors will 
he: OblO, Pennsylvania, New Jeisey 
(who has an M. A. C. man as coach). 
Mar. \ land, and West Virginia. 

TWO YEAR ELEVEN LOSES TO 
SPRINGFIELD SECONDS 21-0 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - MasB - 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B."1)RURY 

io Main Street. 



Fumbles And Forward Passing Ac- 
count For Most Of Scorirg In 
Haid Fought Gtme. 

Last Saturday morning the Two-year 
fool hall team went down In defeat be- 
fore the fast Springfield College eeeond 

eleven on Two-year held to the tune of 
114). The visitors proved themsehes 
the heavier and more aggressiveot the 
two learns and I heir goal line was only 
threatened .nice during the whole »anic. 
and then in the first lew minutes of 
play. One of the Springfield hacks 
fumbled the ball after catching a punt 
licm liangs and it was recovered by a 

two year player on the 14-yard line. 

Another tumble on the second 'play 
gave Springfield the ball and (hey were 
never in danger again. 

The lirst score came about t he mid- 
dle of the second nuartei. when, after a 
series of successful line-plunges the 
visiting eleven worked an off-tackle 
play which netted a lotirchdown. Tiny 
chop-kicked the goal. At the hegin- 
uiug of the second half the Springfield 
aggregation opened up their play a 
little and a long forward acioss the tield 
to a waiting end resulted in another 
touchdown and the goal was kicked. 
The last score of the yame occurred in 
the last part of the third period when 
two successise forward passes by I he 
Springfield gridsters netted 40 yards 
and a touchdown. This goal was also 
kicked In I he last quarter the visitors 
carried the ball over for another touch- 
down but the ball was re-called for 
holding and the Aggie team stopped the 
next attempt at a tally. The score might 
have been large-i had not numerous 
ptmalues inflicted on the Spiingtield 
team lost much ground. Bangs starred 
for the losers while Mason, the visit- 
ing quarter-back, made many long runs 
and handled his team well. 



The Store of Quality and Service 

invites your attention 
to oUI line of 

Ladies' Hosiery 

We carry 

GORDON, PHOENIX, ONYX, CADET 



— IN- 



Silk, Lisle, Wool, Silk and Wool. 
G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOGKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 

Tel. 9-J 



SQUIB NOTICE 

Anyone who knows or thinks that 
he can draw, and wishes to compete 
in the Art Department of the "Squib", 
see Noyes '24 at the Theta Chi House 
as soon as possible. 




Word has been received regarding the 
latest adjunct to the family of Locke 
James '24, namely, a son, Wairen Alger 
James, who arrived on the scene last 
week. 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Just the place to get the proper subsistance 
tor the long hours at the library. 



FRESHMAN TEAM PLANS 
TO DEBATE AT SALEM, DEC. 8 

A Freshman debate has been ar- 
ranged with Salem Sign School to take 
place at Siilem, December 8. This is 
the first time in the history of the 
college that a Freshman team has 
debated oil campus. The subject is: 
Kesolved that federal boards of ar- 
bitration be establi-hed to settle all 
disputes between Capital anil Labor," 
and the Fieshinan team will lake tin 
negative side of the oucsiioii. 

All Freshmen are eligible to coin- 
pete for I he team. Tryouts will he held 
alter assembly, Thursday Nov. 2. in 
the Ragltea Depart incut's otlice at 
Stockhridge Hall. Candidates should 
piesent at this lime a three to live 
minute talk develop! ag one point on 
either side. At the tryouts ProfeetOI 
Patterson, Ass'l Profoaaor I'riiice, and 
Alexander Sandow IS, will act as 
jmlges. The following Freshmen have 
signed up to compete fur (he team: 

Balph Bart, Wiatbrop Ames, Oaear 
Bogera, Eliot Dodge, Kay mood Smith, 

Nanniel Cutler, Leo Noviek and John 
Lambert. 



Varsity Debating. 
A triangular debate 1« take place 
late in the winter term is heing ar- 
ranged for t he varsity team. The suh- 
jeef has not yet been decided upon. 

North Dakota agricultural College 

has a crack team that is making an ex- 
tensive lour of the Fast. It is probable 
that the team will debate here at If, A. 

January 8. The subject will con- 

• iii the adoption of the Towner-Sier- 
ling Fducational Hill. 



COEDUCATIONAL NOTES 

Last Friday night the Abbey, under 
flu. direction of Delta I'hi (iamma, 
held a Hallowe'en Costume Party 
There was a great variety of costumes, 
among them some fearful ami wonder- 
ful ones. While games were heing 
played in the living-room, the girls 
were taken one by one on a ghost walk 
through the basement. Their wild 
-hrieks ascended frequently. When 
everyone had been conducted on the 
walk and had bobbed for apples, refresh- 
ments— pumpkin pie and cider— were 
-t-rved. Then, to finish the evening, 
all the girls sat around the lire and tang 
• dlege songs. 

\t a meeting oflhe Y.W.C.A. heldlast 
Thursday, the budget for the com inn 
>>ar drawn up by the finance committee 
was submitted to the Association. It 
was voted that the budget be accepted. 
1'lans were made for sending a box to 

iris' school in India, where Mrs. 
1 dith Smith, who took courses here last 
.'ear, is now teaching. The Association 

• decided to hold a discussion group 
during the latter part of the term. 
Miss Edith Sanderson representing 

Student Volunteer Movement will 
at the Abbey next Thursday and will 
-'ve a talk to the girls Thursday eve- 
nlng, 

Miss Skinner's class in Hural Home 

bile 50 entertained the Freshman girl* 

at a tea in Fernald Hall last Tuesday at 

1 "ir o'clock. Cocoa and cookies were 

•d by the girls of the class. 



Miss Elizabeth K. Adams, who has 
bean conducting classes in tliii Scout 
work at Smith and at ML llolyokc, 
spoke to the nirls at the Abbey last 
Monday Bight, She will have a train 
ing class started here uexl week. 



FACULTY NOTES 

A faenlty dance, the tirst of a series, 
il is hoped will take place in Memorial 

Hall on Friday waning, Novembers, 

from Mil i". m. The coinmiltt far 

rangementa is made up of afendiune* 

Itutle ifichl, MacKiinmie, and Hicks, 
and Messrs Waiigh, Judkins and 

Roger*. 



Mr. It. A. Mooney 'ltl who has heen 

leaching agriculture at Charieetowa, 

N. IL, for the pas! live years, has re- 
cently joined the depart inent of Agron- 
omy as a graduate -assistant. 



Dr. Frank A. Hayes, formerly of the 
I'ni veisiiv of Iowa, ami more recently 

of the (Jatveraity of Wyoming, is to 

join the Experiment Station Stall as 
reeeareh professor in poultry husban- 
dry. He will till the vacancy lelt by 
the resignation of Dr. Hubert I* Hood- 
ale. 



ALUMNI 

Alumnus of Note. 

Dr. Charles Wellington of IheChem- 
isiiy Depart men I is one of the 
members of that famous class of 
'7:$. After graduating Dr. Wellington 
took three years of graduate work 
under Prof, Ooeeeman. He spent the 

next live years as an assistant chemist 
in the L. S. Depart ment of Agrieiill lire 
but Dr. Wellington wanted to know 
more of his subject, so ta ISM he went 

to the University of Virginia to study. 

From here he well to Europe and stud- 
ied in Berlin, Paris, ami Oottlngen, 
where he obtained his doctor's degree 

in in*.y He one appointed profeaeorof 

chemistry at M. A. C. later that 
year, and Immediately look up his 
work. Dr. Wellington is the oldest 

member oi the faculty in nurabei of 

years of service, and links us directly 
with the glorious past of the college. 
He has done considerable writing on 
chemical subjects, some of which have 
been translated into Cennan. Many of 

hie former pupils are now prominent In 

chemistry. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Huilrling, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non-AtliU ti( Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Asaot tattoo, 
Football Anmh iation, 
Track Association, 

I'he < lollegian, 

Hockey \ssoi iation, 
Basketball Ass. « iation, 
Roister I blisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical ( "lube, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

rslephons 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 I 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175 I 

C. s. Hicks, General Mgr-> 4o> M 

I-. l*. Kami, Manager 13b K 

Ro^er li. Ftiend, President 720 

Perry (I. Hartlett, Manager 8315 

John M. Wliittier. Manager 170 

Charles \\ . Steele, Manager 83*5 

Irving \V. Blade, Editor 170 
Kinest T. Putnam, Managei 

Philip B. Dowden, Manager 8336 

(lustav Lindskog, Manager 530 
T. T. Abclc, Editor 
Thomas L. Snow, Managei 



Nineteen I In wired Twent>-three Index, O. E. Kolsom, M 1 tager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Kit hard P.. Smith, Managei 
M A.. C. Christian Association, Frederick It Cook, Piesident 

Public Speaking and Debating. Alexander Sandow, Manager 



»33« 

720 

»3'4 
•3M 



Saving of 2h% to 40°/ on 

BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask ill lo show von whatever von may he 
interested in. If you don't think that yon will save- from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 
hasis. II. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 

We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that yon must be satisfied or your shoes will he 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices arc as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed. $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1 .90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1.70 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 cts per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are (ioodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING C0|WPAflY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



'20.-- Loving V. (Cy)Tirrell sraaontbe 

campus Saturday. "Cy" is with the 
Animal II tisliandry department at New 
Hampshire State, bat was at l be game 
rooting for "Aggie". 

'20. — Allan C. Williams is now teach- 
ing Agriculture in Falmouth Blfffl 
School. Last winter be taught in tin- 
Ten Weeks' course here on the campus. 
Afterward he was called to Falmouth 
as a substitute teacher. In the month 
that remained hefoie our High School 
Day. he trained a stock judging team 
which came up here at that time and 
stood very high indeed. This fall he 
has heen engaged as a regular teacher. 

"22. — Harry A. Murray is graduate 
instructor in Chemistry at Lafayette 
University. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 






The Massachusetts Cottegian, Wednesday , t No yemberJ1^1922 



READY TO WEAR 

^"r „,„ find a better fit or neater fabric and style than is embodied in 

SOUTHWICK BROS. <& QAULT 

__^ WWSSWM BBSSWSBW SsSsSsBsB ^^■^^■■•"^^^■^■^■^^■^^^"^^^^^"^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

JACKSON & CUTLER 



/?ead[y 
waiting here for you at 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

Continued from page 1 



football team had just won its fourth 

consecutive game of !«• season against 

its difficult opponents New Hampshire. 

Secretary Watts was present from 

here at the I'roviilence, It. I., meeting 

and reported that it was the best and 

lamest ever held there. I.onis Lyons 

»18 was (lie representative to Ftlchburg, '14. -Harold Morse, who is now en 

at which meeting there were 12 to 15 1 gaged in the ferlili/.er business, is inak 



DR. GAGE NEW HEAD OF 

VET. SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Ceorge K. Gage, who has been 
acting head of the Department of Vet • 
ernary Science for a year an. I a half 
has been appoint..; to the permanent 
bead of tlie dcpatlinenl, upon the death 
of Dr. .lames B. Paine. 



UKAl.KKS IN 



alumni, none of whom were of a class 
later than 1800. 

Professor Rand visited the meeting in 
Worcester, Prof, Mackinunie went to 
Hartford, I'rof. Cance to Pittslield, 
and I'rof. Haskell to Willimanlie. 
Director Willard of the Extension Ser- 
vice attended a big gathering at Hoston, 
while Mr. Farley of that department 
was present at New Haven. Conn 

The complete list of meetings held 
Saturday night, as reported to the 
Alumni Office is an follows: 

Dos Angeles, Calif. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Stamford Conn. 
Willimantic, Conn. 
Havana, Cuba. 
Jacksonville, Kla. 
Miami, Kla. 
Valley Station, Ky. 
New < )rleans. Da. 

Amherst. Mass. 

Alumnae, Uoston. Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 

Fit chlui ru. Mass. 

l'ittslield. Mass. 

Worcester. Mass. 

Sinaloa, Mexico. 

East Lansing, Mich. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

SI. Douis, Mo. 

P.o/.eman. Moat. 

Albany, N. V. 

Charlotte, N. V. 

Columbus, Ohio. 
Dayton. Ohio. 
Philadelphia. 1'a. 

Pittsburg, l'a. 
State College. I'a. 
Providence, U. 1. 
Richmond. Va. 
Madison, Wis. 
Honolulu, Hawaii. 



fog his home in Noil hamptoii. 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

THE NEW M. A. C SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 by in. iil 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 




At too mooting in Amherst, tit) men 
were (.resent. Speakers were as fol- 
lows: Paul E. Alger '(H), of Greenfield. 
President Keuyon D. Hutiertield, 
Alvertus .1. Morse It4 of Northampton, 
Acting-Dean William D. Machmer, 
Joseph A. Lindsey '», of Amherst. 
Professor Curry S. Hicks, and Herbert 
W Hlaney '11 of Springfield. 

Mr. Edward Gaskill acted as chair- 
man and "Dew" Walker was OOBJI 
leaders. A roast chicken banquet was 
served by Miss Diether at Draper Hall, 
where the meeting took place. 



At the pond parly Saturday, the fol- 
lowing Freshmen were baptised and 
chastised: .lames Hurnham of Spring- 
field, Peter (Jaskill of Worcester, Her- 
bert Lfodokog Of Bo8ton,(Jerald Thomp- 
son of Shelburne Falls and Kdwin Tuck- 
er of Baldwinsville. 



Dixit 

and GALILEO 



There was much learning but 
little real knowledge in Galileo's 
time (i 564-1 642). Aristotle was 
swallowed in bad Latin transla- 
tions. Ipse dixit. No one checked 
him by what seemed vulgar, 
coarse experiment. 

Galileo fought against the 
dead hand of tradition. He did 
not argue about Aristotle, but 
put him to the test. Aristotle led 
his readers to believe that of two 
bodies the heavier will fall the 
faster. Galileo simply climbed 
to the top of the Leaning Tower 
of Pisa and dropped two un- 
equal weights. The "best peo- 
ple" were horrified; they even 
refused to believe the result — 
that the weights reached the 
ground in equal times. 

"Look at the world, and ex- 
periment, experiment," cried 
Galileo. 

The biggest man in the 16th 



century was not Galileo in pop- 
ular estimation, but Suleiman 
the Magnificent, the Ottoman 
Emperor, who swept through 
Eastern Europe with fire and 
sword and almost captured 
Vienna. Where is his magnifi- 
cence now? 

Galileo gave us science — 
established the paramount 
right of experimental evidence. 
Suleiman did little to help the 
world. 

Hardly an experiment is made 
in modern science, which does 
not apply Galileo's results. 
When, for instance, the physic- 
ists in the Research Laboratories 
of the General Electric Company 
study the motions of electrons 
inrarified atmospheres,or exper- 
iment to heighten the efficiency 
of generators and motors, they 
follow Galileo's example and 
substitute facts for beliefs. 



Gene ral(|§| Electric 

Qeneral Office COllipaiiy Sckcne ctady,N.Y. 








MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



No. 6 



CLASS OF 1924 ELECTS I varsity loses first game dr. goldthwait urges 



C. J. TEWHILL PRESIDENT 



THIS SEASON TO BATES 6-0 



Other Officers for Year Chosen at 
Meeting Held Last Thursday. 

At the meeting of the JnnlorelMI 
after Assembly last week in Stockhridge 
Hall, the election of ofliccrs for tin' com- 
ing year took place. The results of 
this election were as follows: Cbarlei 
J.Tewhill of Florence, president: F'.d- 
ward L Hike ol Westlield, vice-presi- 
dent ; Kit-Haul B. Smith of Creenlield. 
secretary; Kdward Kane of Northticld, 

treasurer; Kenneth Salim I Necd- 

hain, class captain ; Chester Whitman, 
sergeant-at-anns ; and Miss Knth M. 
Wood of North Andover, historian. 

"Chick" Tewhill has been active in 
class activities and both class and var- 
sity athletics. lie is secretary of the 
Senate and a inenilierof Alpha (lamina 
Klio. "F.ddie" Hike is also active in 
class activities and the .Senate. He is 
on the varsity football and basketball 
•quad*, and a member of Sigma 1'hi 
Bpslloo. "I)i«-k" Smith is assistant 
manager ol basketball, manager of the 
l!t24 IMM and a member of Phi Sigma 
Kappft. "Sag"' Kane has also done 
well in class and varsity athletics, es- 
pecially on the basketball court. He is 
a member of (J. T. V. "Ken" Salmon 
has been on the varsity football team 
for two years. He has also been class 
president, lie belongs to Lambda Chi 
Alpha. Chester Whitman it one of the 
old rope-pnll gang. He belongs to l'hi 
Sigma Kappa. Miss Wood is active in 
Co-ed activities ami is a member of the 
< oi.i.K.oiAN board. 



Plucky Maine Eleven Uncorks Suc- 
cessful Forward-Passing Game. 
Fumbles Mar Contest. 

The Mass. Aggie "little giants" wctc 
defeated last Saturday loi the first time 
this season, t>-0, when they met the 
superior Hates aggregation from Lcwis- 
luii, Maine. Although the score was 
close. Hates threatened many times and 
her 10 peiior aerial work gained many 
yards. The contest was replete with 
tumbles nil both sides and all thing! 
combined to make it an especially e \ 
citlag game from the spectators 1 stand- 
point. The only score came at the 
opening of the last period when Davis 
wormed his way over the goal line for 
the bme tally. 

t; ray sun kicked ofl to lbs visitor's l.V 
vard line and Davis carried the ball 
back ten yards before he was dropped. 
Fallow! tried the line for no gain and 
then recovered a fumble. The home 
team held and toned the I'ine Tree 
Staters to pnnl to Heal OB his :i.Vynrd 
line, whence lie ran buck to the forty. 
Captain <■iaysi.ii went throtijih the line 
tor two and a half > aids and follow cd 
with another gala of three yards. 
Heal made two yards and Tumey 
punted over the visitors goal-line. 



NEED OF CORRECT POSTURE 



1925 ELECTS MANAGERS 

AND SMOKER COMMITTEE 

The Sophomore Class held a meetinu 
in tirinnell Arena. OH Tuesday. Oct. 81, 
i.i discuss plans for the Six-man Rope- 
pull and for t he Sophomore-Freshman 
football game. Lewis 11. Keith of 
P.ridgewater was elected football man- 
ager ami Leo F. Duffy of rainier was 
elected manager of the Rope-pull. .John 
Crosby of Arlington and Milton Taylor 
• >l Chatham were the member* of the 
<lass chosen for the Student Athletic 
'ouncil. A class smoker committee, 
<arl K. (iuterman of Springfield, Lau- 
rence II. Hale of South Olastonbiiry, 
COBB., and Kdward F. Ingrahain of 
Millis, was elected. 




Famous Surgeon and Alumnus of Col- 
lege Brings Back a Real Message 
from His Experience. 

At last Thursday's Assembly, Dr. 
Joel B. Goldtb Wall '85, told the student 

body of the Importance of correct 

posture. As an illustration lie hiinselt 

stood in bad positions, then in g I 

ones, and explained the results of them 
both upon the various parte Of the body. 
Dr. Coldthwaii until recent l> has 
worked with adults and children in the 
cities exclusively. Now he is work lag 
among aollage students because he 
believes they are at llie aye at which 

his work will be most beneficial to 

them. 

"Many Collage men ;ind women," Dr. 
(iobllhvvaii said, "are ignorant- igno- 
raut because t hey do not know the iin- 

portaooa of bavlag bealtby bodies, the 

basis of health. They go around slouch- 
ing. Nc e who wishes a healthy 

body can slouch. Oae of the greatest 
problem* of the A. B. F. in Frame was 
to teach tOldlera, who had ill Ibi. I 
weeks mastered their drill, to soqalrc 
an u plight post lire. 

"Stand up tall. Fool ball men don't 
slump. The runnel who is striving to 
reach the tape first knows thai the 
moment he slumps he will give out. 

From an athletic point ol view there is 

but one posture, lien stand eieil when 
big things come to them when they 
have won success or when t hev are mak- 
ing big sacrilices. None of tlie men 
who stood on the deck of the linking 
Titanic slouched. 

"The country is in need ol strong men 
and women. Seventy p«r cent of the 
men who were at Camp Devens last 
summer did not stand correctly. I'hys 
ically the* are able to, but they simply 

did not know how. A generation of 
weaklings who cannot stand erecl will 

mean future generations of weak ling! 
No country whose citizens are weak 
can ever be a Strong country. 

"Maud tall, be fit I Be ready for war, 
or for i he ordinary poraoltl ol lite, and 

\"U will never have anything to 
regret." 



Wb*7-HP 



M. A. C. FLOWER SHOW 

Remember the days :— 
Friday evening 
Saturday, 8 A. M.— 11 P' M. 
Sunday, 1 P. M.— 9 P. M. 

AT FRENCH HALL 

If you like to see good flowers 
tell your neighbors and bring your 
friends 



Malcolm B. Ttnrer '»i ' • "• "• 



The kick w;is relumed ft! once and 
Heal received OB his 17-yard line, riin- 
lliQg to the opponents' 40-yard line be- 
fore be wea dropped. Orayeoa follow- 
ed with a tirst down through the line 
and then Price intercepted a forward 
pass OB his 20-yard line. Fellows made 
two yards and Davis bucked the line 
tor an additional seven and a half. 
following With a leap over the opposi- 
tion for the nee. led foot and a half, 
Folsom carried the ball for seven yards 
an( , followed with a lirst down. 
Fellows lost a foot and then made a 
Continued on psg« 2 



FRESHMAN DEBATING SQUAD 
OF 6 MEN CHOSEN BY JUDGES 

At (lie competition held last Thurs- 
day alter assembly lor the Freshman 
debating (earn, which gOOft to Balem 
Dee. 8, the following men were chosen 
temporarily: Bitot P. Dodge, Samuel 
Cutlet ', Theodore .1. Crant , I.eo Novick 

Oeear Rogers and Raymond B. .smith. 

The .Judges consisted of Professor Pat- 
leison. Professor Primeand Sandow '%\, 
manager Of (he varsity team. There 
will be one or two subsequent debates 
to determine the four men who yo to 
Salem, three comprising the team and 
one alternate. 



W. P. I. TEAM LOSES CLOSE 
RACE TO M. A. C. HARRIERS 

Tanner Noses Out Howard for First 
Place, with MacCready Third. 

The II. A. C track team journeyed 
to Worcester last Saturday to hand a 
deteat tO the Worcester Polytechnic 
harriers by the score ol 1640. The race 
w;is run over a live mile course and 
although it was I good deal rougher 
going than the Aggie men had been 
;u customed to they made a credi able 
■bowing by Winning lh« meet. 

It was impossible to pick I lie WlnnlBg 
team until the final man had crossed 
the tape and the finishes of several of 
the cullies were especially exciting, 
Tanner lor If. A. C. and Howard (Of the 
Institute were leading the held as they 

•o tared the gate with Howard sii^iitiv 

in the lead. Tanner proved hiinselt 
t he fresher Of IBS I BO however and in a 
superb sprint passed his man and look 
lilsl place. His time was •_".! ininllles 
7 seconds. 

'The liyht for the third place was 

close!) con:, tied b.» MaeCreadj of 

kggte and Bagglefl for I be home team. 

n t be freebeest of tbe aggie bai 

lie! proved in a good stead and ;i sprint 
m;ivc thild place I" I he visitors Hill 
led Andei-on over the whole course and 
had no trouble la mainlainini; his ad- 

vantage, which resetted la Bftfa place. 

leaace lost out in his chance for a 

sevenl li by one vard to Diniick, whos, 

sdvaetags lo length of limbs si se 

cured that pboe for the Institute. 

The placing was a- follows: 

Tanner, If. A. C. liist ; Howard. W. 
P I. second; Mac* ready. If.A.C. third ; 
Boggiea. V7. P I. fourth; Hill, Nf . A. C. 
fifth; A iiderson, W. P. I. sixth: Dimick, 

w. P. I. sevenl b; Isaac at. A.C.eighth, 

tiiflord, M. A.«'. ninth; Stevenson, If. 
\. C. tenth: tiannus, W. P. 1. eleventh; 

Bnrhoe, M. A. ( . twelfth. 

D. E. MAC CRKADY ELECTED 
CROSS COUNTRY CAPTAIN 

l.asl Friday eVOBiBg Donald Mac- 
( leady ''£'•'>. was elected captain of t lie 

i rose Coantiy Team. Be Is also eaptaia. 

elect of the Kelav Team. Last Spring 
"Mae" was a point winner in the half- 
mile as well as I be broad jump. In l!»2l» 
he ran on the CrOSS Country team and 
has run I WO year- as a member of the 

Belsy Team. Hecomeefrom Elisabeth, 

S. .1.. and is a member of the Phi Blgmi 

Kappa fraternity. 



OUR OPPONENTS' 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 

SI I.VKNS, 

Delaware. 7 

II ITS, 

Middlebury, 6 

KICHI6AN AOOIB8, <» 

Michigan, <>'■'> 



I 



p p 

§1 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



VARSITY LOSES TO BATES 

Continued from page 1 



yard through the line. Moulton threw 
a forward to Davis who was dropped on 
our 20-yard line. Folsom stalled an 
end run hut fumbled, Alger recovering 
and making the 45-yard mark before 
being stopped. Here an Aggie fumble 
gave the Lewistonitea the ball on the 
40-yard line. Folsom made two yards 
and Fellows followed with four more. 
Folsom gained nothing on a sideline 
play and Hates kicked to Heal on his 
S3 yard line. 

Tumey returned at once with a line, 
long kick, but an Aggie man offside 
brought the ball back. The rangy 
Aggie kicker repeated and Fellows, 
the receiver, was dropped on his 30-yard 
line. Woodman carried the ball for no 
gain and, following an incompleted 
forward pass, Moulton threw one to 
Davis for a gain of one and a half yards. 
The visitors kicked and Howe re- 
covered when the ball was fumbled on 
our 30-yard line. Davis made a yard 
and Woodman doubled the gain, and 
another forward. Fellows to Dessoteau, 
went for a long gain, the man being 
dropped almost in the shadow of the 
Aggie goal posts. After another play 
the quarter ended with the ball en our 
5-yard mark. 

In the second period Fellows tried 
the Hue in vain and a live yard penalty 
put the ball on our 10-yaid line, where 
Captain <; ray son recovered a tumble. 
Tnmey punted out of danger and "OK" 
Marnhmau dropped Woodman in his 
tracks. Davis made seven yards in two 
tries and Moulton passed to Davis for a 
Hist down. Woodman made one foot 
and Davis made nothing. After an in- 
complete forward a placement kick by 
Davis was blocked and "Mace" Alger 
recovered the ball, (liayson made five 
yards and then Tumey kicked to Moul 
ton, who f ambled, and Nowers picked 
up the ball, making two yards before be 
fumbled in turn. Alger fell on the ball 
at uiidtield. "Dame" (iray*on made 
seven yards in two plunges and followed 
by making it first down. Heal made 
five yards and McGeoch followed with 
seven more foi first down. Beal made 
two yards and Grayson three but a 
penalty left nine yards to go, 

After an incomplete pass Heal at- 
tempted a drop kick which was blocked 
and "Jimmie" recovered on the 30-yard 
line. Grayson made one yard and 
Tumey went around the end for fifteen. 
He then made three yards more 
through the line and Captain Grayson 
duplicated the performance. McGeoch 
made it first down by a narrow margin 
and then went through the line for two 
yards. Beal made a three yard gain 
but it waB lost the next play. Heal 
then threw a forward which was ground- 
ed in the end zone. The ball was 
brought out 20 yards and Fellows tried 
the line for no gain. Woodman made 
two feet and Davis kicked outside on 
his 40-yard line. Grayson made four 
yards but the ball went back five on a 
penalty. An incomplete forward pass 
made it second down and eleven to go. 
Heal made three yards and Grayson six. 
The ball then went to Bales on an in- 
complete forward pass by Barrows. 
Woodman made five yards and after an 
incomplete forward Fellows threw a 
long one to Bowe for a gain of 40 yards, 
leaving the ball on our thirty. Moulton 
threw two incomplete forward passes 
and then Fellows threw another and on 
the fourth successive try Grayson in- 
tercepted the pass on his 20-yard line as 
the half ended. 

Sargent received the kickoff for the 
next period and ran it from bis 30 to 



his 36-yard line. Tumey took it around 
the end for 10 yards and Grayson made 
four more. Jimmie Heal made three 
yards and Tumey made another first 
down. "Cap" made two feet and Beal 
one and Marshinan received a fumble 
for first down. Two plays in succession 
made no gain and Beal tried for a field 
goal by the drop kick method from the 
50-yard line. The kick was lined right 
but fell just too short. Moulton made 
no gain and Bates kicked, recovering 
on our 38-yard line in a close decision. 
Moulton made a tirst down and Davis 
ntade one foot. A penalty made it first 
down on our 8-yard mark. Three plays 
gained as many yards and Grayson re- 
ceived a fumble on the 5-yard line. 
Tumey dropped back behind the line 
and kicked out to the 47-yard mark. 
Davis carried it seven yards to our 64- 
yard line and Woodman was slopped 
for no gain. A pass, Davis to Fellows, 
put the pigskin on our 30-yard line and 
Moulton made four yards. Grayson in- 
tercepted a forward on his 10-yard line 
and then made three yards. Bales was 
given the ball on our 5-yard line on a 
"freak play" and Davis made two yards 
as the period ended. 

In the final quarter Kempton started 
and made no gain. After a penalty 
Davis made six feet and then went over 
for a touchdown. A placement kick for 
goal failed, making the score 6-0. Pet- 
erson kicked off to Beal who ran 15 
yards to his 35-yard mark and Tumey 
went around end for six yards. Cap- 
tain Grayson made first down on the 47- 
yard line and in two more plays made 
seven yards. He then took the ball 
around end for a first down. Line tae- 
tics and forward passes failed and the 
ball went to Bales on their 23-yard 
mark. Woodman made four yards and 
Fellows made three. Davis got away 
for a good gain and Grayson pulled him 
down on the 40-yard line. The visitors 
could not make the required distance 
and Davis kicked outside on the 23-yard 
line. Tumey went around the end tor 
five yards and Davis intercepted a for- 
ward on the 30-yard line. Woodman 
made three yards and Fellows took the 
ball for a first down. The same pair 
made six yards in two plays and Kemp- 
ton passed lo Uowe for another first 
down. Fellows made three yards and 
Davis was held for no gain. As the 
game ended the visitors were threaten- 
ing to score again. 



FRUIT JUDGERS AND PACKERS 
COMPETING NOW AT NASHUA 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



Six Seniors Make Trip With Profs. 
Drain and Oould 

The Fruit Judging and Packing 
Teams left early this morning by auto- 
mobile for Nashua, New Hampshire, 
where tbey are to compete against sim- 
ilar teams from all the New England 
slates except Maine. The contests in 
judging and packing are held in con- 
nection with the New Hampshire State 
Horticultural Society. Professors B. D. 
Drain and C. II Gould accompanied the 
men. The members of the Fruit Judg- 
ing Team are: Richard Wendell, Fred 
Sears, and Gilbert Irish, all of '23. The 
members of the Fruit Packing Team — 
also all of '23— are: Howard Bates, 
Thomas Snow, and Howard Gordon. 



— OK — 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICKS 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 



INOOKl'OKATKO 

273-270 High St., 

Tel. WB2-W53 



Holyoke 



The summary: 

Bateb Mass. Aggik 

Rowe, le re, Sargent 

Guiney, It rt, Mohor 

Peterson, lg rg, Nowers 

Price, c c, Alger 

Blake, rg lg. Mudgett 

Scott, rt H. Salman 

Descoleau, re le, Marshman 

Moulton, qb qb, Beal 

Fellows, lhb rhb, Grayson 

Folsom, rhb lhb, Tnmey 

Davis, fb fb, McGeoch 

Score by periods: 
1 
Bates, 

Mass. ^ggie, 

TouchdowD — Davis 
penter, W. P. I. Umpire— Young of 
Pittstield. Head linesman — Ingersoll 
of Dartmouth. Time— 15 min. periods. 
Substitutions — Bales: Kempton for 
Moulton, Woodman for Folsom. Mass. 
Aggie: Ferranti for Sargent, Myrick for 
Salman, Barrows for Beal. 



I 






3 


Referee 



4 

6— 6 

0— 

-Car- 



A daylight-saving petition has been 
given to the faculty of Colgate Univer- 
sity in an effort to give the football 
squad an extra hour of practice. 



Confidence Wins 

If you have confidence in the clothes that you wear it helps you out 
every day. Have confidence in your clothes, confidence in your 
team, and you will get the most out of the game. 

A new Hart Schaffner & Marx heavy overcoat and a 
snappy Mallory hat will start you right. Come in and 
let us show you how little it costs to be dressed right. 



F. 



M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for Thirty-five Years. 



OF COURSE YOU WEAR SHOES 

Many men do not give sufficient consideration 
to their purchase, however, and as a result, 
their shoes soon lose their original shape. 

Next time you buy, let us PROPERLY fit you 
with a pair of 



N 



— smart appearance, great comfort, long life. 



BOLLES 



Amherst 



Lend Your Support 

to the team by following its 
activities as well as those of 
other colleges in the 

Boston Evening Transcript 



SAVE! YOUR STEPS! 



You will find in our store shaving supplies, soap, tooth brushes, tooth paste, and many 
other little articles lor which you sometimes walk way up-town. Why not step in here at 

YE AGGIE INN 

By the Campus Entrance. 



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•95 

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..•:'-. .;. J 







WELCH MALE CHOIR 



FIRST CONCERT OF SOCIAL 

UNION SERIES SATURDAY 



Rhondda Male Choir of Welch Sing- 
ers is Reputed One of the Best 
of the World. 

The famous Bhondda Chorus of 
Welsh male glee singers will give a 
concert in Bowker Audiioiium at 0-30 
Sat unlay evening, Nov. 11. This is the 
opening entertainment of the Social 
I'nioii series. The choir consists of 15 
singers, conducted by the Premier 
Welsh Conductor, I'rof. Thomas Moig- 
an. It recently won tirst prize at an 
international musical festival, held at 
Pittsburg, I'enn. Opinions of this choir 
its expressed by leading musical critics 
of the country indicate that an unusual 
opport unity is offered to members of 
our community to hear one of the best 
male choirs of the world. 



REV. HUGH BLACK GIVES 
STRIKING SERMON ON NOV. 5 

"Love not the world, neither the 
things in the world" was the text of 
llev. Hugh Black's sermon last Sunday 
ii eliapel. Seldom has a man of more 
• 'motional power and nerve spoken here. 
limphasizing each point with dramatic 
wires, he brought his ideas striking- 
ly home to his audience. 

He said that while 'worldly things" 

| be interpreted in many different 

ways with each man having his own 

• l of "sins'" which he must avoid, the 

iM-lusive definition of "worldly things" 

i: "Whatever is keeping you from 

tod, That is your world and you must 

'late it." 

iteT. Mr. Black is at present in the 

nion Theological Seminary of New 

ik City, and is well known in this 

irt of the country for his excellent 

I -aching. 



FRESHMEN AND DEERFIELD 
BATTLE WITHOUT SCORING 

In a fast, exciting game last Friday, 
Nov. I, the Freshmen anil Deerfield 
played to a nothing to nothing lie. 
Deerfield almost scored in the first five 
minutes of play, but the yearlings 
kicked out of danger from behind their 
goal-line. "Joe" Hilyard, brother of 
"Norm" II, was the outstanding figure 
on the field and made some good gains 
for Deerfield. He also stopped every- 
thing that came bis way. The Fresh- 
men completed several forwards and 
came very near a touchdown on one 
which was ruled incomplete. 

In the first period Howling made a 
fine catch and took a free try for a drop 
kick on the fifty-yard line, the ball fall- 
ing short. In the last minute Deerfield 
tried a peculiar formation with the line 
spread clear across the field, but the 
play was stopped without change by the 
Frosh. The teams were evenly matched, 
a fact which showed even to the final 
score. Next Friday the yearlings are 
scheduled to take on the fast Williston 
eleven in Kasthampton. 

The summary: — 



M.A.< . KUKSHMKN. 

I Buckley, le 
! Tulenko, It 

Thurlow, lg 

Wade, c. 

Gavin, rg 

Jones, rt 

Shedd, re 

Coubig, qb 

(iustafson, rhb, 

White, fb 



lihKKKIKM) AI'AIt'v. 

re, John Husso 

rt, Clark 

rg, Amstein 

c. I ton no) I y 

lg, Armstrong 

It, Cook 

le, Jos. Kusso 

qb, Butterfield 

rhb, L. Parker 

fb, Hilyard 

rhb, W. Parker 



| Grayson, lhb. 

Score: — Freshmen 0, Deerfield 0. Sub- 
stitutions — for Freshmen: Anthony for 
Couhig — Couhig for Wade — Frasier for 
Anthony — Anthony for White. For 
Deerfield : Perry for Amstein —Amstein 



for Perry — Dowling for John Busso. 
Referee- Shufelt, M. A. ('. I' moire — 
Dresser, Tech. High. Time- 12 min. 
periods. 

Next Friday the Freshman eleven 
plays Williston Academy at Kasthamp- 
ton. 



PROF. SEREX HAS QUEER 
ACCIDENT AT THE FLINT LAB. 



Curious Accident in Chem. Professor 
Serex Nearly Blinded. 

What might have turned out a seiious 
accident in t lie chemistry 'department 
in Flint Laboratory last Thursday morn- 
ing was prevented by the quick work of 
the Sophomores in the first houi section. 
Professor Serex, who had been grinding 
lumps of caustic potash, became sud- 
denly blinded when a piece of (he sub- 
stance Hew into his eye. One man im- 
mediately splashed water into his fine, 
another seized a wash bottle and shot a 
stream of water into the affected eye, 
while a third man called a doctor. By 
the lime the doctor arrived, however, 
Professor Serex was comfortably at 
work. 



RELIGIOUS CLASSES 

Mr. John B. llanna held the first of 
a series of discussions on "Christianity 
and the Industrial Reconstruction," in 
Fiench Hall last Thursday evening. 
This week's discussion, to be held at 
the same time, 7 i*. m., and place is on 
this topic: 

"Are there conditions and practices in 
modern individual life that conflict with 
the Christian ideal for society? If so, 
what are some of these practices, and 
may they be remedied, and how." 

Bev. Mr. Ward will also hold his 
weekly meeting in Memorial Hall at 
the same lime. 




It may look like wool and feel 
like wool, but no fabric goes into 
Rogeri IVet clothes without lust 
passing their chemical test. 

Young men's suits and over- 
coats that are absolutely all-wool 
and fast color. 

Prices moderate. 

Rogkks Pkkt Company 

Broadway Herald Square 

at 13th St. "Four at 15th St 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 41st St. 

NKW YORK CITY 



The Best in 
Drug Store Merchandise 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rex mil Store 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 
Open under new management. 

P. 1). HOMANS, 

l'rop. 
Tel. 489-W 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Well 

.nkw much 

Men's Whole Sole*. KiiIiImt Heels . . . $2.50 
Men's Half Solo. Rubber Heels . . . $1.75 

Min- Kilhhel Soli x . ItiiMiri I/ccIh . . $2.25 

Ilea's Half Boles $1.35 

Work (iuaranteed— A.MIIKIiKT HolttK 



IT'SA HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, t922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



* 



TOE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ar- 
ricultural College. 

BOAKI) OF KlHTOltt. 



| lt MN.. W. Si. a hi-; '2S Edltor-ln-Thlef 

I , iiikh B. Akkimho.n "JS Manaiflnif Kditor 

Job* O. kkai>'24 ess't «•»•■ ■*•" 

1)i-.pai:tmi vi Hi a i. s: 



Editorial. 

Athletlin. 

A <-:iilf>n i • s. 

< annum. 



I it \ iso W. SiM'i: "M 
A I 11 Kit I B. W*M«H 
l.i u is II. KBITS 'SB 

l.i i in i; li. Ai:i;rs..iuN >flj 

,|,,n\ G. Ill vt. ti 

(n ski is r. Oi.ivKlt. .lit. tt 

lie I n M. Wool. TM 

I., hit Ascis Kk.nm i>v '24 

JOSH M Winn ikk'28 



Facalti . 

Aliiniiil. 

Two-Year, 

Kxeliaincc anil 

communications. Babi Cobbb 11 



BcBlNEHH DSPAKTllKKT. 

Owsn K. roUOfl '23 Business Manager 

BOSBBT K. BTBBBB Vi Advertising- Manager 

Ci.ih-'oki. L. IIfi.i.fn '24 < ini.Ution Manager 

l„, NA i ri NV. I.kvms'-j:. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopies, 10 centB. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scriber* will please notify tbe business 
manager as soon an possible. 

Bntered as second class matter at the A inherit 
Poet Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage pn.\ t.led for in section 1103. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized Auguit 20. 1918. 



On to Tufts. 
It Is soma years iIbm iiif itudeal 
body of Mass. Aggie bate deputed fo* 
Tuiis in a ipseta! Hani, ebartered, re- 
quisitioned, Blled, and run by aggie 
baekem. Tafta la obi llnse-wora rival 

in football and in olden days tlie Tufts 
BBBM could piiliaps have been truth- 
fully deslgBBted as the bio t-vi'iit of tbe 

season. We I r glowing aecoiints of 

the train-loads <>l siudents who used (o 
journey to the other end of tbe slate in 
MBieb Of ".lutnbo's sealp". It was 
a hard tbini; to oet aiul many the falls 
the Aggie warriors received. 

The past three years' results have 
been entirely satisfactory to our sea- 
sons' records Three yean BgO a size- 
able aggregation Of Tufts' men invaded 
the Aggie: campus willi tbe pertinacity 
which siunilies unquestionable success. 
The ineptitude of their forecast inus was 
forcibly proven by a shut-out score. 
Two more consecutive victories have 
knotted a string which we do not want 
broken. 

Willi a new coach Tufts is back on 
bel feet agttiB BOB" has a team which 
promises a formidable contest on Nov. 

is. Considering « be vigoroBi backing 

OUT team has a rigiil to on such an oc- 
casion , t he old special train idea has 
been levived. 

Not only will t he train carry students, 
but a special car for the Aggie team 
will probably be attached. lhenb> 
sliubtly cllttint; down tbe expense for 
the football season, ami at the same 

time keeping tbe players in an nttnos* 

pberc of cheerfulness and coiilideiice. 
Of cotiise no student is asked to pawn 
his physics' book in order to make the 
trip, but a little of ibat unearned in- 
crement derived three weeks ago from 
nearby sources BtlftBI be gailtleeslf 
used t<> advantage and all those who 
can otherwise afford to no should lose 

no time in making a decision and sign- 
lag up for the journey. Show the 
Boston Alumni that college spirit is 
still at its highest level and show the 
team that Us efforts are being appreci- 
ated : 



Prosperity and Agricultural Colleges. 

Agricultural colleges are slowly get- 

lino back on their feet ajjain after the 

ravage! upon their total attendances 

brought abont by tbe war. This state- 
ment must be studied with the most 
careful scrutiny to determine the un- 
derlying principles involved. And 
there must be some f undameiil al rea- 
son why the agricultural pursuit has 
not received its share of recruiis from 

the colleges, 
first, apiculture is being regarded 

as an industry of small income and 

much labor. Abb large percentage of 

the student! who come to M A. C. are 
eity-bred, it must mean that Ihe city is 
offering better monetary inducements 
in its diverse professions and trades. 

li tbe idea that farming enterprise! are 

remunerative was prevalent . M A < 
ami every oilier agricultural college 
WOOld be Hooded with studenls and un- 
doubtedly would be forced lo close its 

doors to s e. II Ihe number engaged 

in agriculture were to continue decreas- 
ino as it has in the las! decade, then 
before ■ great many years the increased 
demands for food and raw materials 
could not be inei adequately ami the 
price of agricultural products would 
rise to such a plane that it would in- 
vite a host of new producers from 
every walk of life. Ibis mneral eco- 
nomic truth may have Something to do 

with small registration la agricultural 

colleges. Willi the leturn of prosperity 

in agriealtare the effeeti eaa be 

studied. 

Secondly, tbe yOUOg people are re- 
garding farm life as ostracism from all 
social life. Such a view is in kecpiim 
wilb most articles written about farm 
life, and in fact , the Bgriettll lira I com- 
munity has deserved most of its criti- 
cism. Conditions are ohaBgiUg, bow- 
ever, wHh ihe advent Of the telephone, 
the automobile, good roads, etc. , so t hat 
before long a more favorable attitude 
toward country society must gToW. 
When prosperity letiirns lo agriculture 
and when Ihe farm is conceived as an 
enjoyable place to live on, then Bgricol- 
tural colleges will grow and multiply, 
but only slowly until then. 



FIRST FACULTY DANCE A 

MOST ENJOYABLE AFFAIR 



Monthly Dances Planned for Winter 
Term. 

The lirsl of a series of faculty dames 
was held in Memorial Ball, Friday 

evening, Not. 8, at eight o'coek. Thirty- 
four couples attended BBd had a most 
enjoyable time. Wood worth's orchestra 

furnished excellent music. Professor 
Cbenovvelbs' cider, always of line qual- 
ity, attracted more attention than usual 
and Landlord Bogetl was kept busy 
lillino i be "flowing bow|." 

The committee in ebarge consisted of 
Protestors rVaugb, Judklns.and Rogers 
and Mrs. Hut terlield, Mrs. Micks, and 
Mrs. MacKiinmic. The chairman Of the 

committee was Professor Judkina. Tbe 

party voted to hold a dance once a 
month during thevvinler. l'oi I be next 
dance, Professor Wauo.li and Mis. 
Butterfleld retired from the committee 
in favor of Professor and Mrs. (iunmss. 



Town Hall, Amherst 

House Peter,, Matt Moore 
and Virginia Valli in "The 

Storm." h reels 

ihUTSday Here's a picture for you: 
\ou'vc never -e. n such a 

Northwest story as this adap 
ration of Geo. Broadhnrats 
sensational stag! success. 
The hose colorful forest 

lire, t Ik- mail race Of the 

canoe through* the turbulent 
Mat. 3, Kve. waters, tin- snowstorm, the 
6.45 8»30 human Interest, the comedy 
touches and the superb act- 
ing make "The Stoi m" one 
of tin- sensations of the rear. 



Newt 



Comedy 



Friday 



Mat 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Helena Chadwick ami 
Richard DU iti"Yellow Men 
and Gold,"iiom Qoaveraenr 
Morris' fameas tale el se> 

\ entitle. 

Sport Review 
I reel Sunshine Comedy 



Marjorie Daw ami Bertram 
Saturday Grassby in "Fifty Candles.' 

from Karl Kelt Miu'ger's Sat- 

unlav Evening l'«»st story, 

one of the most llirillliit: el 

his career. 
Mai. 3, Kve. News 

6-45. 8-30 ., ,,. ( .| MacK Sennett Comedy 



FAST, HARD GAME EXPECTED 
WITH STEVENS SATURDAY 

Next Saturday the team goes '■> New 
York to take on the Stevens Bggrega* 

lion, although the lal ter have scored 
but I points this season I bey have played 
some last teams, and atlheemli.f the 
lirsl hall they had l be Springfield < 'ol- 
lege team 2-0. A last , hard name Is ex- 
pected and the hope is that all the men 

will be in condition to. start tbe game. 

While there are no serious injuries after 
the Bate* fray there are several men 
who have minor hurts; but so far it is 
expe.ted Ibat the regular lineup will 
start. 

In connection with the game the New 

York alumni are running a mass meet- 
lag and are takino the team to "Beef- 
Steak Charlies" alter the game. They 
bavesboWfl a ureal deal of interest in 
the game Bad, as it is the lirsl lime that 
an AggiS team ever appealed near the 

metropolis, a large crowd of "grada" is 

expected to witness the contest at 
llobokeu. 



FOR SALE 

UNDERWOOD STANDARD PORTABLE 

Typewriter 



I A IKS! MUDKI 



PRACTICALLY NSW 



Apply Collegian Office. 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Stiulio MASOMI BLOCK Northampton. 

Club Mu'tit Dances - populai with m. a. « Men. 
Private Lessons by Appointment 

Te l epho n e 7<a Northampton 



Stand Up Straight. 

('best out. chin in! How many men 
were just a bit ashamed of their pos- 
ture when they heard Dr. Gold tb Walt '■ 
talk al Assembly last week'.* How 
many who hadn't Ibottgbl much about 
it before resolved that they would 
try to si and tall, to be lit '.' II Dr. 

Gold tb wail should glee a series of 

lectures here bow many men would 
attend them ".' 

There are at M. A. ('. required courses 
in a number of sciences. No man can 

secure bis B. s. degree from ibis col- 
lege without some knowledge of chemis- 
try, botany. BOoloflV, and ol her sciences. 
Yet not one If. A. ('. man in ten has an 

adequate knowledge of bow to keep his 
body in the lies! of cotidii ion-k now- 
ledge wbicb would be ul the greatest 
value to him. 

All men desire to be lit. Athletics 
make men til. but all men cannot be 
athletes. Tbere is no required course 
which will teach tbe whole student 
body how to become lit. Lectures COB- 
earning the physiology and care of the 
body would meet a real need and IbBM 
lectures would be doubly worth while 
if they were delivered by Dr. Gold- 
thwait. He is a forceful speaker, be 
has a thorough knowledge of ortho- 
paedic SBrgery, and he likes work 
among college students. What about 
it? Serious consideration by faculty 
and students is demanded in this 
question. 



M. A. C. FLORISTS READY FOR 
ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW 



KIINGSL- ELY'S 

SODAS SUNMES CANDIES 

Lulu iieoiiette 
140 Mail i\ eel, Northampton, Mass. 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 

Huir Bobbing 

Facial Massage 

Head Treatment 



Northampton and Holyoke Florists 
Also Staging Good Exhibits. 

The Floriculture Depart tneiit is mak- 
inji ever) effort count in their desire to 
make this year's Bower show surpass 
all previous ones held at th. OOllsgS. 

Competition in ''i*-- exhibit will be 

keen, for in three of the classes prizes 
are offered, each to be a year's sub- 
scription to the l-'/m-ists' Exchange, a 
prominent trade paper. Tbe competi- 
tion will be for two-year and tour-year 
students, and all the ftoweri used are 

grows in the college greenboBsas. 

chrysanthemums will predominate in 

the show, although roses carnations, 
and some Other Sowers are being do- 
nated by neighboring tlotists for exhi- 
bition. OB Sunday afternoon music 
will be furnished by a college orchestra. 

The members ol ihe Noil ham pton and 
Holyoke F. ami »i. Club are planning 
to lata out in a body and will bring 
some worth while exhibits with them. 

The annual Skinner Cup competition 
for the 12 best 'mum blooms of one va- 
riety will be staged at ibis slmw, for a 
cup donated by Miss Belle Skinner of 
Holyoke. This competition is forniem- 
bers Of the olob only. All indications 

point to a highly ■ueoessfaJ show. 

l'uiir presence is welcome. 



II . J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 
Eevry thing All "Write" Here 




no mailer what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or tin 
school, we <<an provide ihe very be* 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your wrlltng-desk we have Letter 
Paper. Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Ten- 

Ink, Pencils, Unlets, HuCllBge. StC 
Every article is warranted, and oui 
prices are as low as you will find any 
where. We should be "lad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 



OVERCOATS 




ULSTERS 



ID 



E have just received twenty-five of these bent of imported eouts tiiid for the first time this Full, we 
have all sizes from 31 to I2> See these at once and get your nick. 

More than a Toggery — 
A College Institution. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

If ISS Edith >ander.son of the Student 
Volunteer Movement spoke to the glrlfl 
in the living room of the Abigail 

Adams Hall last Thuisdav evening. 
Miss Sanderson told Interest ins stories 

about missionaries and their work. 
She also had conferences with those 
girla interested in becoinino mission- 
aries. 



On Monday SVSalng, Oct. 80, Miss 

Elisabeth Adams ol tbe <;iri Seoul 
Movement nave an lateresting talk on 
Scouting, She Informed tbe girls thai 

if Pi of them were iulelesled in I he 
work a class could be started, li is ex- 
pected ibat such a class will begin Ibis 
week. 



1)11 Hallowe'en Bigbl Miss Dielhef 

greeted the Draper Hall boarders with 
some veiv prettily arranged decora- 

lions. Every one appreciated the pump- 
kin pie, cider, pop colli, and apples 
which were pari of the holiday celebra- 
tion. A spirited long yell lor Miss 
Diet her was given. 



House Dances. 
Last Saturday after the ttaieagame, 

I'lii Sigma kappa and <J. T. V. held 
well-attended house dames at I heir re- 
spective houses. There wele 1st couples 
at Ihe Phi Si^ dance. The girls Wen 
all co-eds or from Ainheist. Mr. and 

Mrs. Louis Lyons were guests, "Buddy" 

Frost's ordbestrs supplied music, and 
punch was served fbf refreshments. 

<f. T. V. had 22 couples at I heir 
dance, which was one of the best they 
have ever had The ohsperones wen- 
Mrs. CaBBsrofl from Mount Holyoke, 
Miss Pitman from Smith, and Mrs. 
Osmaa of Amherst. Bob Wood worth's 

orchestra WSm tbe musicians and Ifias 
furnished Ihe refreshments. 



I)r and Mrs. (barbs L. Marshall 
held B reception at their home on Sun- 
sel avenue last Weunesday eveniii" 
From H-(M) to 10-0(1 for graduate students 
and instructors. Members of the fac- 
ulty were invited, ami refreshments 

r* set ved. 



Catholic Club Elections. 

\ I iis meeting in the Social Union 

ns last Thursday evening. Ihe 

' Hholir Club elected the following ofli- 

: President, Lawrence F. Broderlck 

i Hyde Park; vice-president, Mary 
■i. Foley '24 of Worcester; seeretarj and 
usurer, Leon F. Dully '36 of Palmer; 
- tldeat advisory board, Francis E. 
Buckley Ttoi Satlek, Mary . I. Foley. 
W liter F. Mahoney '2-"> of Millville, 



s.uv noise should be stopped from 7-80 
to 10-80 lo tbe evening. This step is a 

decided innovation in Ihe later year 
annals of t he dormlton . 



EIGHT FRESHMEN CHOSEN FOR 
"J. C/ESAR" AGGIE REVUE 

At the recent t r\ ouls for "J. (icsar," 
the Fieshman act of tbe AggiS Uevue, 
Ihe following palls were cbosi -u : 

Cawat, Barber, Elmer E. 

Mark A a tony, Grant, Theodore I. 

Brutus, Harris, Stephen F. 

Casslns, Liudskog, Herbert A. 

Cassa, llitriiham, .lames I 

Trebonius. Hart, Balph H, 

Lmiiis, Anthony, Stewart H. 

Stage Hands, Murphy, Edward T. 
Barrell, Sober! \v. 

The Bolster Dolstera have decided to 
present as their pari of Ihe aggie 
Uevue Ihe "Maker of Dreams" by 
Ollpbant Downe, a lant.isy in one act. 
They will also present "Ihe Medicine 
Show." a scene by Stuart Walker, tbe 
originator and director ol the Port 
Mauleau Theatre movement, Tryouts 
for ihe above will be held sometime 
I his week. 



ARE YOU GOING ? 

Have yoO signed up lot Ihe Tufts 

special'.' II not, take account of slock, 
and BAOB vntii tkam in iis BI0OK81 
QAHB ol Till sKxson. You'll also be 

backing yoor class ami your fraternity. 
Tbe fraternity bavlag Ihe largesl per 
eeat algaed up for the tram yets one 

special ticket to the game. The num- 
ber signed up will be printed by classes 
in next week's COM.BOIAM, 

The team's car will also go with this 
special train direct to Boston. The 
Annie Band, 80 pieces strong, will per- 
form on both trips. The train leaves 
Amherst at 7 45 \. vi. Saturday, ami 
will return from the North Station at 
S-tMl p. m. Sunday. 

sinn up by tomorrow night to gel r« 
daeed rates. If 800 are signed up the 
roond trip fare will he isVf.O. Stop at 
Kappa Sigms or Phi Sigma Kappa 
houses, the Memorial litiibliny. North 
and South tjnileges, or the Dminn Hall, 
to si >i n up, and no IT now. 



There were 17 men oul lot the band 
rehearsal last week. This showing is 

better than some previous ones inn is 

not so y I as it miyhl be. There are 

in college al least 86 men who could be 

in ihe band. Everyone of Ibeui should 
be oui for rehearsals. 



A cheering section made up exclu- 

■ively of women is to be organised at 
New York University, which will then 



h UeCabe '« ol Holyoke. and N. F. |(( . , ||e ljn . ( ,„ have ,,„. lll)il)ll( . ,ii S |i, lc .. 
>ia two-year '24. After the officers 
were elected plans for the coming year 



ie discussed. About 70 si lldenls at 

ided the meeting. 



lion of 

squad. 



possessing a female cheering 



Cbompsoif s Cimclp Calks 



The occupants of the West Entry of 
S Hh f.'olleije assembled in room 11a ] 
h '• days age to discuss a system of — 

v hours. A gestlemen's agree- Tunuppnyc cunp 
was made whereby all unneces- '""Wr*"'" ^ ^"^r, 



W .- still have some Golf Halls at reduced 
prices. Better stock up while the prices are 

OH. 



Rear National Bank 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlolltll IIIKl J<<\vel«-i- 
*J PtSBSSBt Street nn one llluht . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

ltiu r Hen Alarm ( lo. k- and ol ln-i BSttaMS Makes 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

•ELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Pi ices. 
Informal* m Specialty 

II So. Prospect SI.. A in he 1st M.i-- 

Tml. 000. Af 



GRANGE 

Fine Groceries 
Canoics and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mill* Studio, I, l'one IM.ll, P.O. Block 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Prsssins, Cleanins and Repairing 

Dry CleaninK and Oyeins 
itn,v voiii preestas ticket tresn H.GanuMM'M 
FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS ..,,.1 all the 

ss r iss sn Bxlaas, TO rent or FOR sale 

Horn* Broa. Neckwear 

Unlet roar next Snji |» Oven oat here now. 

Hesl selections ol Woolens In tbe latest |«I 
terns al wars on band. Tbe btabquallti of out 
irork Is apparent on fancy garments lev hh! 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdasher. 
It \ in i t. v st Nut to Western Union TstLOAca 



THE 



Northampton, Mass 
The leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 

SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 



Tuesday, \\ < dnesday, 

Nov. 7 Sod M 

Tbnrsday, Friday and 
Saturday, Noi ,s, IS. 1 1 

(Mat. and Bl • 



Henry Jewett Repertory Co.. Cassilis encasement. 
St. John Hankin 



Henry Jewett Repertory Co. in "Liars." 
Brilliant coined] bj Henry Arthur Jonas. 




Wear Duofold and Keep Warm 



Wear Duofold Health Underwear and keep 
comfortable inside and warm outside. 

CARL, H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

T/ir House of h'nppenltcinier (,',,<>(/ ( lotkes 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, NovemberJ^1932^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



««i 



tt 



BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other b<h«1 things to eat. 

MRS. I-. M STEBBINS 

MWI.IIe Street. R«I.4S5-W) lla.llcy. Mam 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made lo order - $35.00 to $45.00 

Raincoat* 
Hull* PrwMdMc MUttarj TaHorias 



ovi.i; \ hams' i'i:r<. si hi: i. 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

tOt lil-l I'lllKK 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 
18 Pleasant St., Auilicrsl. Mass. 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 
( iiiaraaiuH igarettei Bpeetal piles per carte* 

on ( Igsrettes. 

Bcbrafft'a < hocolatss and othei lesdina lines. 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 



/1TH $40.00 worth of 
good Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal Mixture, 
well fed with good roughage, 
you can produce at current 
prices $170.00 worth of milk. 

These feeds to be found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealer's stock. 



CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO. 

New York Chica *° 



2 3' , Protein 



40' , Protein 




HPIwwiwmBSzSo* 

Fluor mm " '•?/ 
"■^EjWXMOII 8.5% 



1925 GETS JUMP AND WINS 
SIX-MAN ROPE-PULL FROM 1926 

The Sophomores triumphed in an later- 
elass contest lasl Saturday, wIhm. Ihey 
defeated tbe Freshmen In the six-man 
rope-pull between the halves of the 
Bates. gftflSe. Cheer-leader "funny" 
Wirtli acted as the starter of the event. 
On the lirst start th« Sophomores got 
i |,e |amp OB the "»»■" ami were celled 
back for a new try. At the second 

starting signal tbeSophomoree laid right 

t„ and took in two t of rope. They 

then laid down on the rope and in spite 
Of all their beavtng the Frosh were un- 
able to budge them an inch. Not saiis- 
lied with winning l>.v well a small 
Biargln the Sophs again heaved to ai.d 
gathered in a couple mole feet. 

After the pull Ibe victorious Sopho- 
Bioret twooped down upon the field and 
took possession of the rope. Some 
Piosh at tempted lO secure some pieces 
,,l i he hemp and as a result a man-sized 

free tor-all ensaed for the rest of the 

halt. 

Those pallins on the success! ill team 

were: Rnaaell B. fttaver, Donald W. 

Lewis, \i.drew W. Love, John F. Lord, 

Edward F. Lusrabntu, and Karl M. 

White. The Freshman team was com- 
posed Of JOBB Moiiart.v. Fdward T. 
Murphs. Robert W. ISurrell, Edwin H. 

Tucker, Henry B. Mcbardsen, and 
George II. Tburlow. 

II, e S.phi.mores. with Leo Daffy, 
manager, will receive their numerals as 
a result of I he victory. 

WESLEY AN TO RACE M.A.C. ON 
HOME COURSE SATURDAY 

The Cross Country team meets the 
Wc-lcyan aggregation heie Saturday 

afternooa ami the race will be rua over 
;i five-mile eom>e. Capiala Norton ii 
the visitors' beat bet and hie work will 

hear watching. \Vcslc.\an won their 
meet with Worcester Polytecb hy the 
More of W-W rccenily. and in the Trian- 
gular meet held at Bprlugfteid id which 

WlMiams.Spiinulield ami Wesley an com- 
,„.,,., I ibe latter linished third, notwith- 
standing the red that Captain Norton 

placed sec 1 lo I he meet. 

The lace will start a! S 15 and will 

end between the balveaof theTwo-Yeai 

— Connecii.nl Aggie second learn foot 
hall game. 

C. L. WIRTH 13 CHOSEN TO 
HEAD THE LANDSCAPE CLUB 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 



Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



Mass. 



Drurys Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B.~DRURY 

io Main Street. 

"PHOENIX" SILK STDGKIN6S 

Are I'linninent Annum tin 
raaMHU Make* We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX ST0CKIN6 
At $1.55 

i„ a u 1 value for women MB* want the liest 

there is in llWlm tlOCStm that yet 
will tit the ankles tiiinly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and proniply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



All Interested in This Work Invited 
to French Hall Tonight at 7. 

The ,i,sl tneetinii 51 this season of the 
Landscape Clnb, which toufc place last 
Thursday altera i In Wilder Hall, was 

1 1,,- occasion ..I I he election of officers 
f„r i he coming ><;ir. Conrad L. Wirlh 
'88 <'l Minneapolis was elected presi- 
dent. Donald I*. Alexander *S8 of ltox- 

bar] secretary, and .lames II. Uadsby 
-21 oi Nmth Anan. s treasurer. Roland! 
Rogers oi the Horticultural Depart men I 
took charge oi the meeting before the 
elections. " J 

Tonight at 7 o'clock a lantern lecture •> 
Will he give*, l.y Tt.. lessor VYaBgb In I ", 
room II, French Hall. These meetings ^ 

; ,ie lor the heiielil of all students and 1 Z 

faculty oi the college who are Iniereeled, — 

iis well M for those taking the landscape ~ 

: courses. Some interest inn Speaker! £ 

j,,,,! a I meetings are being lined up Z_ 

for t his winter, and it is hoped that the ="" 

ohl-tinie enthusiasm in the chili will S 

s.m.ii he re\ i veil . — 

Laths in a tub ot ice-water are the — 

punishment for fruali rale-brahera at = 

Colorado State College, I |s 



' :v 



After Every 
Meal 



*« 



*n 



.v# 



The 

Flavor 

Lasts 



TYPEWRITERS on easy terms. 

CHEMISTRY APRONS that protect your clothes. 

EVERYTHING the student needs. 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

in the Memorial Building. 



SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM OF 
EIGHT CONCERTS THIS YEAR 

The Social I'nion program for the 
coming winter it* given below. It will 
he noted that this program is composed 

largely of musical attractions; ihisis 
so, not beeaoselbe oommittee definitely 

planned it. hut hecanse they could mil 
secure this year whai t hey cotisideied 
satisfactory entertainment which would 
^ive a larger variety. 

It will readily he seen (hat this is i In- 
most expensive, and it is hoped Ike 
beat, program which (lie Social I'nion 
has beau aide to present . 
Nov. II, Set. 6-40 P. m. — Welsh choir. 

Dec. I, Pri. S-Mp. m. Sarin rodlera. 

IS, Kii. 6-H0 p. m. — Aii»ie Review. 
.Ian. 12, Fri. ti:{ll i- \t. -Kloyds 

( Magicians) 

4, Sun. :t-(Mi r. m. Knssian Ca- 
thedral Quartet. 

», Kri,«-H()H. M.-ScotliHh Musical 
Comedy Co. 

it, Kri. <i-;»i I-. m. Meieterslagere. 
Sun. 3-00 r. v.— Proa Concert, 



Keh. 



Mar. 



PROFESSORS TO ATTEND NATL 
MILK ASSOCIATION MEETING 

Thursday and Friday Nov. !» and 10, 
Ibe National Milk Producers' associa- 
tion will hold their annual Beet lag in 
SpriagSald. The association is a very 
• \teii8ive tanners' organisation, the 
baalaeaa transactions of which involve 
al.out *300,000,000 annually. Il is the 
time the annual meeting has heen 
hehl in New Baglaod, l'roin i nent 
ipeakcfl from all over Ihe coiiniry will 
liscuss dilfereiit phases of (he milk 

marketing problem. The hundreds of 

tinners and other men interested in the 

dairy baeleeea in atteadaoee will inelode 

Messrs. .ludkins, raxle, l'endleton, and 
^mitli of the Dairy Lepartment. 



FACULTY NOTES 

The Animal Hushandry Department 
i- otlerinR six months old plge to tbe 
faculty at (he attractive price of nine 
cents per pound live weight, or thirteen 
i' nis per pound dressed. 



«-**_= 



\ poaltry breeding ex|ierimenl of 

treat interest and significance has just 

beea summarized hy Dr. H. D. (ioodale 

illetin 211, which will he published 

shortly. 

Ten years ago the station began to 

breed ap from a well-known exhibition 

•train of standard-bred Hhode Island 

Reds, Tbe average egg yield t lie first 

fear was 114 eggs per bird. Last yeara 

ii ck of 100 descendants of these birds, 

laid in the pullet year an average of 

- : Bggl per bird. 

In 1013 the average age for laying tk« 

egg was 255 days. In 1020 tbe 

age age for the tirsl ecg was 2(M) 

l. This striking increase in earli- 

"■ * of maturity was not accompanied by 

loss of weight or vigor. Whereas 

111 »st of the birds in the foundation 

,! k showed pronounced periods of 

htoodiness during several months of each 

r. theirdescendant8 have lost a great 

I of their inclination to brood. 

In 1913-14 the average highest monthly 

I ! net ion was 17 eggs per bird. In 

1920-21 the average highest monthly 

v - Hi eggs per bird. 



d 



The winter pause In egg production 
has beea markedly reduced. The orig- 
inal tlock in their pullet year up to 
March 1st averaged only M egge 
The present Soak daring the same 
period averaged 07 v^n<. 

One mother hen with a record of MS 

egga bat 16 dans b ten witb >varage age 

at lirst em; of 1KH days and an average 

winter production up lo March I of 80 

•gga, 

Tbe reinai kahle icsults of lliis e\- 
peliinciit prove lhe\alueola tystema- 

tie program ol breeding baaed on the 

known laws of inheritance. 



ALUMNI 

Alumnus of Note. 

'04. Arthur W. Gilbert, since 1010, 

has been Massachus.t is siate Com- 
missioner of Agriculture, lie received 
;t It. s. degree from Boston University 
at the time of hie gradual loa from M. 

A. C. Ill IMS at Cornell he k his If, 

s. degree in agronomy; and four yeara 
later his l'h. D" For several years he 
was a member of the faculty at the 
University of Maine. From 15(1*7 to 1019, 
when he became state Commissioner of 
Agrloaltare, be was agricultural seere 

larv of the liostoti Chamlicr ol lum 
in e Ice. lie is a me in her of Alpha Sigma 
Phi, I'hi Kappa I'M, Sigma Phi and 

Alpha /eta. 

The following Alumni were hack lo 
witness the lasl two genes of their 
A Ima Malei : 

S. Freeman '21. W. Clapp '00, M. 

Caaaldy '10, E. Burehata tJ, W, Peek 
'21. i:. Lambert '21. L. Ileal '22. K. 

I. ard '22. .1. Brighaaa "21. \V. Webs 

tei '21, <;. Wesi '21. A. Center ex'00, 6. 

Carey '22. 15. Me A idle '22. F. F.aiteanx 

ex"*24. C. Uriel! M'.», <;. Blanebard '22. 

it. N'inlen '22, fi, TbompaoU '22. S. 

Lyons If, K. Sanford 'SO, ii. Cosby lit. 

\V. ilurll.iirt I'x'lS, |{. Waile 21. N 
Lincoln '21. I). Feck '21, <L Robisoa '21. 
F. Hale e\'2tl. A. Spauldin- 17. <L 
Malletl 12. D. Cande 15. 0. IL Cwdy 
'22. C. \V. bunker 21, L. <.o,il,l _M. |{. 
Taylor *tl, K. Barnard "SO, M. .1. Mur- 
doch '22, N. Cilleit '21. Ceo. Mcllican 
15. F. Iluel '15, K. K. Field '22. C. F. 
Clark '22. C Little TO. 0, QUtthOB 17. 
F. Wauuh '22, ami Ii. .la.kson '22. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Dickinson are 
receiving eoagratalatlona oa the birth 
of a daughter. Sarah Sietson, on Ihe 

morning of November six. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 

COMMISSION COMING 

College to be Inspected hy Education 

Commission, Shall M.A.C. 

Become u University'!' 

I'reaidetil liutterfleld has Informed 
tbe student bodj aeveral tlmea ol the 
fact thai the Leuhdaturt has passed h 
resolve providing for an invesllaatlon 
relative to icebnieal and higher eduea 
lion in ihe Ooinmou wealth. He baa 
also stressed Ihe point oi tbe far reach 
ing effect the rejxirl of this commission 
will most prubablj have on tbiscollege.' 
The eommission ex|tects to \isii ihe 

campus :ii mm early date lo inspect Ihe 
plant and obtain the views ol Ibe far 
oily and stafl on this momentous proh 
lem, 

This special commission has a per 
sonnel of eompetenl men and women. 
Lemuel 11 Ifarlin, presidenl ol Boston 



University, is chairman: Mis. UsorgS 
M l; 1 L •■ 1 : William DeUin, piesidcnl 

..i Boston College ; Jeremiah M Bt Is 
coll : « iiilton If, Blehardsou, ;i trustee 
of M. \ < : Fell* Vorenherg, and DTi 
Deorgt L. Bellale, Superintendent ol 

Schools in fill liivcr, who Is also secre- 

larj "i the commission, an 1 bs »( ber 
members. Tbe oommisslon has engaged 
l»r (ieorge F /uck ol Ibe Federal Board 
..1 1 dueation, who is an expet 1 in sdu 
cat tonal matters, to direct tbe survey, 
iiius Insuring the beet results possible, 

Because <>t his slaty Bva j ard punt i" 
the Wesleyan game last year and his 
all-round kicking abilities, T. it. Kl- 
llott, Amherst's star mil hail,, is men- 
tioned in Walter Camp's "Inter collegl 

ale football t, tilde " as one ol 1 lie lead 

1 11 o punters and placement kickers ol 
tbe 1021 season. Mis 00 yard pual was 
Burpassed by only a very few, and his 
two 36 yard plat^emenl kicks against 

M . A.I. are als.i incut ioned. 



Saving: of 2b% to 40/ on 

BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS 

If vow art: in need of any kiml r>f Footwear or Hosiery jn^i come 
into our store and ask us lo show you whatever you may be 
interested in. If you don't think that you will .save from 
25 in |<> per cent., we don't want you t<> buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 
hast*. I'. S. blubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high cn-aiU' 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices art- as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels* sewed, - - f.70 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 1. ts per pair. 

We will sew soles il V' in" shoes are (ioodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



Jobs (i. Mct'rimtnon, who until re- 
cently was a gndeate aaatstant lathi 
microbiology department, has gone to 
Ohio .State fjoiversltj where he will 
have the position of assistanl in the 

bacteriological laboratory. 



Research men an busy digging hack 
iato tbe archives oi ooliegc football to 

gad whether or not King College estab- 
lished a record when it rolled up ^><i 
points against Leaoir Saturday. Bye 

witnesses of the murder, when ques- 
tioned, said that only the exhausted 

eonditionof the bsehs prevented fur- 
ther atrocities. 



The new gymnasium project for 

Urown University to cost *750.(MMl was 

accepted at the annual meeting of the 

Brown rniveisity ( oiporalion recently. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 






'if 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 8, 1922. 



TIME WILL 




It is just a question of time when you will take out that last season's overcoat and see how shabby it looks. 
Better take a few minutes off and step around to Southwick Bros. & Cault to look over the best line of winter- 
wear coats ever. THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD. 



Agents for Dobbs Hats and Caps. 



SOUTHWIGK BROS. & GAULT 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
The Agronomy Department bmjimI 
installed In its Graduate Laboratory a 
piece of filtering apparatus known as 
the Sbamberland-PMtenr Filter. With 
this new filler run by h motor driven 
air pump, it is possible to clear water 
extract of tbe soil in a few minute*. 

This new addition lo die equipment of 
the laboratory will he very useful in 
research work. 



The Animal flunbandry Department. 

Mr. lilaiteiiei's class in Beef Product- 
Ion last Monday visited two meat-rais- 
i no farms in this vicinity. At the 
Mountain Farm owned by Oscar Belden 
A- Sons, in Kast Colrain, a line herd of 
Hereford cattle was examined. The 
class also visited t he Hradsi net rami in 
Hatfield, owned by tbe same men. 
Ilcrelhev looked over a Mock ol Sunt h- 
iliiwn sheep. 



course in "Producing and Handling 

Market Milk". The coins*! in "Home 

Flower Gardens" by ft. T Hollar of tbe 

Floriculture Depl. is one of the most 
popular so tar this fall. I'rof. Sliahan 

oi the Rural Engineering Dept. has 

aided in preparing a "Handicraft 

Printer" for ana In tbe Junior Exten- 
sion Service. 

• 
TWO good records have heen recently 

completed by cows in the college herd. 

Princess lieth of Amherst, a llolstein. 

aowraokaaa the third blgbeat cow In 

the I. am with a yearly record of 81,870 
pounds of milk. This record was com- 
pleted Oct. 21. and had BOt the BOW 
heen out ol coiidilion during tbe early 
months of the test would probably have 
reached 84,000 pound**. 

Nantaskei College Quet i Quora- 
te] . has just linished as line a record as 
a senior 2-year old, with 9169 pounds 
milk, and 405 pounds fat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurers Office $1.00 

Bt.M l> y mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



I'miii rfi-lliisini mlrii Department, At 
t lie Department staff meeting held in 
i'rof. Grabam'a office laai sat unlay 

morning. Prof. Blea ol the Animal 
Husbandry Department gave a detailed 
account of ll Npeiimeiit be carried 

on last rammer to abow 'he value ol 
milk as a food lojr growing eblekena. 

Dr. Hays gave a summary of I he work 
done hy Dr. Hearst of England in 

breeding poult rj for egg production. 

I'rof. <;raham also reports that the c\- 
periimnlal llock, which consists of till 
(he pullets raised from last year's Hock, 

e> 

with Hie exception of the cripples, is 
laying 50% more aggl than was the 
llock last year at tbla time. He feels 
this is a lair comparison ami a very 
creditable showing. Next year he ex- 
peels to sell batching egga ami babj 
chicks lidin I his llock, hill only in 

limited nambera. During the past 

summer about S80 cockerels from t he 
experimental Dock were sold to people 

in various parts ol the slate. It has 
heen found possible ©J using cockerels 
from this llock for three siiceessi\e 
years, to increase the egg production 
of an ordinary llock by 60%. Dr. Good- 
ale has a bulletin on breeding la tbe 

press now and a popular version of (lie 
same bulletin ready to go to preee. 

The Judge foi the Dressed Poultry 

and Kgg SI ow to he held ill Boon 819 
Stoekbrfdge on the 24th ami Both of 
November litis not yet been obtained. In 

addition to Judging the exhibits, the 

Judge will give a talk on some subject 
related to the poultry industry. All 
the work is connection with the show 
is <lone by the students. There will 
also be student j edging and picking 
contests. The show will afford a good 
Opportunity for the students, faculty 
and others to gel aline fowl forThanks- 
o i v i n o dinner. 



u: 



hoo Store 



PROF. RICE MAKES TESTS 
WITH PUPPY DOGS AND PIGS 

Professor Blea of Ho- college carried 

out an lotereatlag experiment daring 
tbe eigbt weeki previous to the Beet- 

am Stales Imposition, lo illustrate the 
value of milk in the ration. 

Two | > i o s from tbe same litter were 
leafed "til on balanced rations, one pin 

getting milk. Tbe one with milk went 
from M lbs. to SO. The other went 
from 24 lbs. to 52. 

Four puppies of one litter were also 
tried out on balanced rations. A male 

t bat bad milk grew from a weight of 

:•• lbs. to 16. A female ol 3 lbs. grew t<> 
welgfa ll- a male ami a female wblob 
bad no milk grew i«> weigh only 6 lbs. 
each. A group ol cockerels averaging 
28 ob. ai tbe stait were tried out with 
balanced rations, nalag three different 

sources of protein. Those having milk 
averaged 89 <>/.. at the end of the test, 

those bavlag meal acrape averaged 46 
os., and those bavlag roeeaaul meal 
averaged 4b 08. 

The animals and bird- were exhibited 
by the New England Dairy ami Food 
Council at the Exposition an*! they 

attracted mueb attention. 

Professor Hiee lacohllnuThg the ex- 
periment with the puppies, la an at- 
tempt lo see how long it will take the 
stunted ones to attain normal weight 
when placed *>n a milk ami biscuit 
diet. The two normal pups now weigh 
respectively 16 and 16 1-2 lbs., while 
tbe stunted ones weigh 14 and 16 Ibe. 
each. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield, Mass 



No 



C&rp?rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

i, Cook Place. 



Amherst. Ma<w 



The Kxteneion Service has several new 
correspondence courses to offer this 

fall. Tho Poultry Dept. under the di- 
rect ion of Prof. Graham has prepared 
a brand new course in "Poultry". 
This course is thoroughly up to date in 
every way. Prof. II. F. Judkina of the 
Dairy Dept. has adapted one of his 
senior courses into a correspondence 



REPORT ON FEEDS AND 

FERTILIZERS APPEARS SOON 

The annual report of the chemical 
control of fertilizers ami commercial 
feed st utts will shortly be put out by 
the Experiment Station. II. D. Has- 
kins la In charge ol the fertilizer con- 
trol amir. 11. Smith is in charge of 

tbe feed control. 

Mr. llaskins la going lo Washington 
to attend a meeting of the Association 

ol Official Agricultural Cbemleta, to be 

held Nov. 15-20. Mr. Smith is golagto 
Washington also, to meet with the feed 
control officials in a conference immedi- 
ately preceding the above. 



Kodaks and 

Kodak Supplies 

At Deuel's 

Get the 

DEPENDABLE FILM 

In the Yellow Box. ■ 

Velox and Azo Paper, 
Flash Sheets and Plash Powders for Interior Work, 
Developing, Printing and Enlarging hy Experts. 

Deuel's Drug Store 

Victor Records 

Are coming along much better. We will try and get any record 
that you want if not already in stock. New dance records 

twice a month. 



Deuel's Drug Store 









MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 



No. 7 



ANNUAL FALL FLOWER 
SHOW ATTRACTS 2000 



WESLEY AN BEATEN IN CLOSE 
FIVE MILE RACE ON FRIDAY 



Mammoth Blooms of 'Mums Shown 

by Students and Local Growers. 

Special Exhibits from New 

York and New Jersey. 

The Floriculture show held Nov. 10, 
11, and 12 in French Hall waH a decided 
success. In all, about '2000 people at- 
tended it, with ihe largest attendance 
on Sunday afternoon. Three rooms 
were used for tbe exhibits. Exhibits 
of the Holyoke and Northampton Flor- 
ists' and Gardners' Club occupied one 
room, table decorations another, and a 
general exhibit staged by students the 
third. The walls of the roomB were 
prettily decorated with southern smilax. 

Chrysanthemums of many species were 
a feature of the show. One table 
showed the evolution of the chrysanthe- 
mum from a tiny-flowered species to a 
huge-flowered one. Another table 

showed one flower of each of a great 
variety of species. G. U. Sinclair of 
II ilyoke won the Skinnpr cup offered lo 
a member of the Holyoke-Northampton 
Florists' and Gardeners' club for tbe 
best 12 blooms of one variety. The 
prize-winners were 12 mammoth white 
blooms. Butler & Ullman took second. 
The students exhibits were very well 
staged. F. D. Luddington '23 won tbe 
prize — a year's subscription to The Fl»r- 
i*l>C Exchange - offered tor table deco- 
ration. In his plan of decoration be 
used yellow crysanthemums and tiny 
white ones very effectively. Two other 
prizes offered, also subscriptions to 
Continued on pa*e 8 

M. A. C. CLUB OF NEW YORK 
ENTERTAINS FOOTBALL MEN 



Visitors Place in 1st and 3rd, but Ag- 
gie Wins by Three Points, 26-20. 

Last Friday afternoon, repeating their 
good work of tli week before, the 
M. A. C harriers defeated the Wesleyan 
Cross Country team here by (he MOM ol 
20-20. The race was run over the regular 
five-mile course, and the winner's time 
was 28 minutes, 18 seconds. Smith 
of Wesleyan led the lield through the 
whole race and easily carried away first 
place. 

The course was in excellent condition 
and the time was good. The visitors 
wereraore used to a level sandy coarse 
but did well, linding the hills a 
little difficult. 

Captain Norton of Wesleyan was 
second over tbe course and la lbs gate 
but a spurt by M act "ready on the field 
enalfled him to capture second place for 
Aggie. Isaac. running in groat form for 
M. A. C. , was in eighth place when he 
entered the gate, but by a final burst of 
speed he passed Flosdorf and Severence. 
pmttng them in seventh and eiglh 
respectively and taking sixth himself. 

Stevenson was greatly missed by 
the M. A. C. team as his work so far ibis 
year had been exceptional ; but because 
Of injuries received recently he was 
unable to run. 

Much credit is due tbe local 
Continued on page 8 



PACKING AND JUDGING MEN 
BOTH TAKE FIRST AT NASHUA 



Royal Welcome Given the Team in 

Their Victorious Invasion 

of the Big City. 

As a most fitting climax to last 
Saturday's victory over Stevens, the 
entire football team making tbe New 
Jersey trip, was given a banquet by tbe 
New York Alumni Club in the evening 
following tbe game. It was rather a 
signal event, inasmuch as it was tbe 
first time tbalan Aggie team bad ever 
>een so entertained by an Alumni Club 
in any city. The banquet, or "feed'" 
as Pres. Morse of tbe Club called it, was 
held at "Beefsteak ChariieV'and about 
sixty Alumni in addition to the team 
were present. 

Tbe speakers of the evening, intro- 
duced by Pres. Morse, were Pres. 
Butterfield. Prof. Hicks, "Kid" Gore 
and "Cap" Grayson for the team. 

Tbe team had to leave at 10-30, but 
ibe business meeting of tbe Club was 
held after that and a number of im- 
portant topics were to be presented for 
discussion. 



IriBh '23 High Judger, and Snow '23 
Best Packer of Those Competing. 

Both tbe M. A. C. Fruit Judging 
Team and the M. A. C. Fruit Packing 
Team came out first in the New Kng- 
land Fruit Judging Contest at Nashua, 
N. H., Nov. 8. The Judging Team 
cured 1690 points out of a possible 1800. 
New Hampshire was a close second. 
with 16874 points. Connecticut was 
third with 15944 points, and Rhode 
Island fourth with 1540. The highest 
individual scorer was Gilbert Itish 23, 
with 580 out of a possible 600 points. 
The second was Fred Seats IS, will. B7fl 
points, and third Alfred French of N 
H., with 573 points. The M. A. C. 
Fruit Packing Team came out with an 
average of 91.7% against New llainp- 
shires 85 3. Thomas Snow 23 did the 
best work in both the box packing and 
tbe barrel packing contests. 



WELSH CHOIR PRESFNTS HIGH 
CLASS PROGRAM OF SONG 

Folk Songs and Opera Selections by 
Distinguished Rhondda Choir En- 
joyed by Enthusiastic Audience. 

Those who attended the nuiirii given 
last Saturday evening in Bowkof Audi- 
torium by the llhoiidda Welsh Male 
(.lee Singers hail a rate opportunity to 
listen to men who have heroine musi- 
cal artists of the highest type, under 
the leadership of t heir conductor, I'lol. 
Tom Morgan. 

The program consisted of martial, 
folk, humorous, sea ami national selec- 
tions. The opening chorus stirred the 
audience with Maunders ever-popular 
"To Arms.*' The baritone soloist , Uaw- 
ley James next gave an effective dia- 
malic and dialectic interpretation ol 
two Welsh folk songs. Another Welsh 
chorus accorded such applause that the 
choir gave an encore with a rollicking 
selection. "The Mulligan Musketeers". 
"Soldiers ami Comrades'", a stirring 
duet of the Hravuro style, was next 
given by J. 11. Williams, tenor, and 
David |{cis. Iiiss-bari lone 

At tbe opening of the second half of 
the program, the choir sang "Peace lo 
tbe Souls of the Heroes' in recognition 
of Armistice Day, during which the 
audience rose in respect to the fallen 
dead. Next followed two tenor solos, 
"Absent" and "Mountain Lovers," two 
humorous quartet selections. "Tt.i. 
are Women" ami "A Catastrophe,'' ami 
"A Musical M uddle" by the choir. Two 
baritone soloists uext distinguished 
themselves. David Howell*, in tbe t.i 
miliar song "Asleep in the Deep" and 
David Rees in "Where the Deep Seas 
Boll.*" The latter was accorded much 
applause in its powetful volume. The 
choir followed with a merry pirate song, 
"The Jolly Koger." 

Continued on page 8 



STEVENS LATEST VICTIM 
OF AGGIE LITTLE GIANTS 



Team Shows Great Fight Before 

Large Body of Alumni and Wins 

Fifth Out of Six Games. 

The Mass. Aggie "little gia >ts" eauic 
through again last Satuidav for I win, 
making a record of fixe wins out of six 
siarts. The unfoit unalc team this 1 1 AM 
was Stevens, and tbe MOM was IS4). A 
large crowd of New York alumni wen- 
-mi ibe field and about SO undergradu- 
ates made t he long trip to llobokcn lo 
see t be team in act ion. 

Crayson kicked off and Ibe Kngineeis 
made seveial good gains around the 
ends before the \ggie line held and 
forced them to punt lo Harrows. The 
lirsl three plays went lor a liisl down 
and then Tuiney kicked to < >"< al lagha n 
on the laller's '.ill yard line. liecker 
made live yards around Ihe end ami 
O'Callaghan kicked to BftjrrnWI, the 
ball going out of bounds on t lie 30 yard 



OUR OPPONENTS' 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 



TUFTS, 

Howdoin, 

MICHIGAN AGGIES, 
Ohio Wesleyan, 



)2 
13 

t) 
9 



CROSS COUNTRY TEAM WINS 
OVER AMHERST TUESDAY 

The Maroon Harriers, with Tanner in 
their lead, raced to victory over A mln-isi 
on (he Amherst LoftSJ Green Course yes- 
veiserday afternoon Although Cobb of 
Amherst placed first in tbe race, the 
linal score was It-SB. Both Cobb, run- 
ning the couise in 21*' 5*". and Tanner, 
whose time was 30' 14", broke the 
course record of 30' 15". The order of 
placing was as follows: 

Cobb, Amherst 

Tanner, M. A. 0. 

Mac( ready, M. A. C. 

(inert B, Amherst 

Hates, B. H.. M. A. C. 

Mac Flanders, Amherst 

Hill, M. A. C. 

Isaac, M. A. C. 

Newell. M. A. C. 

Srhofield, Amherst 

Kingman, Amherst 

Tisdale, M. A. C. 




H. DKS. M..HOK '2'J It. T. 

■ark. On the next play Harrows 
fumbled and Stevens recoveied on the 
same spot. Del! art threw a pretty 
lateral pass to OCailaghan who went 
Continued on paff« 2 



MASS-MEETING TONIGHT 

He ready fo fall in line with the 
paiade which starts from the Daven- 
port tonight after supper, and camel 
all dates to get to that Stock bridge 
Hall mass meeting. Seven fine 
speakers have been secured, besides 
a spectacular two-act play by Ihe 
Freshmen. You'll get in ihe right 
spirit lo help push the ieam to vic- 
tory on Saturday; they i i y ■ 

tonight and at Tufts' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 



STEVENS GAME 

Continued from page 1 



around the end for eight yards. Snider 
made the two yards necessary for first 
down through center. Becker and <)'- 
CallaKhan both circled the ends for a 
net gain of seven yards and Snider 
Iried the line for no gain. The M. A. 0. 
line held and the ball went to the 
Aggies on their 10-yard mark. 

Turaey immediately kicked out of 
danger but the ball was brought back 
on account of an offside. Xothing 
daunted, Tumey booted the pigskin to 
Snider on our 35-yard line. O'Calla- 
ghan threw a foiward to Snider for no 
gain and Becker found the end good 
for seven yards. Snider tried the line 
in vain but on the next play the home 
team made its first down. Becker and 
O'Callaghan went around the ends for 
two and three yards respectively. O'- 
Callaghan then made it first down 
around the end on a lateral pass, taking 
it through the line on the next play for 
two yards. Snider lost two yards on 
the next play and Stevens lost the ball 
on our 4-yard line when a forward, De- 
Hart to Laverie, failed to net the re- 
quired yardage. Tumey kicked to the 
50 yard line. O'Callaghan returned the 
punt at once. Grayson carried the ball 
three successive times and then Turaey 
kicked to Becker on the latter's 45-yard 
mark. O'Callaghan punted to Barrows 
on the 25-yard line and the latter made 
six yards through the line on the next 
play. The period ended with the ball 
on the 30-yard line. 

Tumey kicked to Deliart on the 40- 
yard mark and, after a double fumble 
by the home team, the Aggies recovered 
the ball on Stevens' 25-yard line. Cray- 
son made six yards and Mcdeoch du- 
plicated the feat, carrying the ball 
through center for a first down. Mc- 
Geoch went through center to the 
1-yard line but an offside took us back 
five yards. A fumble gave the En- 
gineers the ball on their 5-yard line and 
they kicked out of danger. Barrows 
went around the end for three yards 
and McGeoch made it a first down. 
Grayson made a yard through the line 
and McGeoch made three, carrying the 
ball over for the initial tally on the 
next play. The goal was missed, owing 
to a bad pass which forced Beal to run 
with the ball. O'Callaghan kicked to 
Beal on the 35-yard line. McGeoch 
made two yards and followed with a 
first down but the Stevens line held 
and the Hobokenites got the ball on 
downs. O'Callaghan kicked to Beal on 
the 40-yard line and Captain Grayson 
made a half yard through center. 
Tumey took the ball around left end for 
12 yards and first down. Grayson and 
McGeoch made a total of three yards 
and a half and Marsbman passed to 
Tumey, the half endiug with the ball 
on the 30-yard line. 

McGeoch received the kickoff on the 
10-yard line and then tried the line for 
no gain. Tumey kicked to DeHart on 
the latter's 30-yard line. Becker tried 
the end for one yard loss and Stevens 
kicked an onside punt which they re- 
covered in midfield. Snider passed to 
Laverie but Stevens was offside and the 
ball was brought back. O'Callaghan 
kicked to Barrows, and Tumey returned 
to DeHart on the latter's 35-yard line. 
Snider recovered a fumble and the 
home team tried two forward passes, 
both of which were incompleted. 
Snider punted to Barrows and Tumey 
rounded the end for seven yards. 

The next play was stopped for a 5- 
yard loss and Tumey punted to DeHart 
on Stevens' 45-yard mark. Snider tried 
the end for a 1-yard loss and Marsh man 



intercepted a forward pass at midfield 
with a beai'tiful shoestring catch. Mc- 
Geoch made two yards through the lm.- 
and Tumey added another three yards. 
MdJeoch made three and Grayson 
made it first down with a 5-yard gain. 
Grayson made three yards, two yards, 
and four yards in three plunges and 
Barrows at tempted a field goal from the 
20-yard line which failed. O'Callaghan 
tried a forward to Snider and then 
punted to Grayson on Stevens' 40-yard 
line. Grayson made a yard through 
the line and then the Aggies lost two 
more on an attempted end run. A 15- 
yard penally on M. A. C. for using the 
hands on the offense forced Tumey to 
punt to Snider on the 26-yard mark. 
Barrows received the returning punt on 
the 35-yard line and Captain Grayson 
made five yards through the line. Mc- 
Geoch made two more before Tumey 
punted to DeHart, who fumbled and 
Snider recovered on his 26-yard line as 
the quarter ended. 

On the first play of the final period 
Grayson broke through and stopped the 
play for a 5-yard loss. O'Callaghan 
punted to Banows at midfield and 
Tumey returned U> the home team's 15- 
yard mark. Marx broke through and 
spilled the runner for a 5-yard loss and 
forced G'< allaghan to punt again. 
Barrows caught the pigskin on the 50- 
yard line and, with wonderful interfer- 
ence, ran through the broken field for 
a touchdown. The additional point 
was missed on an incomplete forward 
pass. McGeoch caught Ik* kickoff M 
his 10-yard line and ran it back 1". 
vanls. Grayson bit the line for nine 
yards and then added five more for a 
tirst down. Again the captain carried 
the ball through center five yards and 
then added 12 more. Shifting from the 
line he made 10 yards for a tirst down 
on the 2S-yard line and then went 
through center for one yard. A 15- 
yard penalty for holding brought a 
forward pass which O'Callaghan inter- 
cepted on his 20-yard line and ran back 
10 yards. Grayson broke up a long 
forward and then spilled Laverie when 
he had made a 25 yard gain for a for- 
ward pass. Two Stevens passes failed 
and O'Callaghan punted to Barrows 
who made a fair catch on bis 20-yard 
line. Tumey punted to midfield and 
Stevens worked a short forward. On 
the next play Ferranti intercepted a 
pass and ran 10 yards before he was 
dowued. Grayson made two yards, 
three yards, and a first down and then 
carried the ball around the end for 
seven yards. A fumble gave the En- 
gineers the ball and O'Callaghan passed 
to DeHart for a first down. Marshman 
intercepted a forward pass and ran 20 
yards to his opponents' 40-yard mark. 
O'Callaghan intercepted an Aggie pass 
and stopped with the ball on the oth«r 
40-yard line. After an incompleted 
pass O'Callaghan threw one to Laverie 
for first down and another for a 20- 



Touchdowns — McGeoch, Barrows. 
Substitutions— Mass. Aggies: Sargent 
for Bike, Beal for Banows, Banows for 
Beal, Alger for Myrick, Ferranti for 
Bike, Gleason for Marx, Abele for 
Alger; Stevens: OMahoney for Turn- 
bull, Balch for Deliart, Shur lot Becker, 
Clauss for O'Maboney, Turnbull for 
Clauss, Welter for Snyder. Referee— 
Mason, Springfield. Linesman -Camp- 
bell, Colgate. 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



— OK- 



RIFLE TEAM TO BE AWARDED 

MINOR SPORT LETTERS 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 



Eleven Men 



of LaBt Year's Team 
Honored. 



As soon as the committee convenes of 
which l'rofessor Hicks is chairman, 
rules will he drawn to determine the 
conditions under which letters shall be 
awarded to the members of the rifle 
team. Bitle competition will be consid- 
ered as a minor sport, and the letters 
to be awarded will be similar to those 
of the basketball letters, namely, a 
prominent M . with a ■Ball B on its left 
and aT of a similar si/.» on the right, 
l'.leven men received their letters last 
year, and if the men on this year's 
lean are successf ul in the national or 
in the dual meeis it seems certain that 
they will be awarded their letters. 



1NCOKCOKATED 

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Tml. WB2-1063 



Holyoke 



A. MIENTKA 

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Men'H Whole Holes. Kuliber HeeU . . $2-50 
Men ■ Half Sole-. Kubber -Heels , . . JJ.75 
Men'M Uiibber Soles. Hubber HeeU . . »*.« 

Men's Half Sole* »'"" 

Work fiuaranteed-AMHKRST HOUSE 



Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

Cinars and ('Urarettes-Siiecla. price per carton 

on Cigarettes. 

Schr.ilTfs Chocolates and other leading lines. 

Or maker % mnd Canned Good* 







yard gain as the final 

The summary : 
Mass. Aggie 
Marsbman, le 
Marx, It 
Nowers, lg 
Myrick, c 
Mudget, rg 
Mohor, rt 
Bike, re 
Barrows, qb 
Grayson, lhb 
Turaey, rhb 
McGeoch, fb 

Score by periods : 
1 
Mass. Aggies, 

Stevens, 



whistle blew. 

Stkvens 

re, Balch 

rt, Cross 

rg, G. Turnbull 

e, Glaeser 

lg, Claus 

It, Janos 

le, Laverie 

qb. DeHart 

rhb.Snyder 

lhb, Becker 

fb, O'Collagban 



I 

6 




3 4 

6—12 

0—0 



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standard of 

an Investment... 
(joodJippeuninu 



THE WINNING TEAM--" ENDURANCE AND QUALITY" 

it's always the best side which wins— it's always the best materials 
that last and expert craftsmanship that gives service. 

Kuppenheimer 

GOOD CLOTHES 

ARE — 

The ideal of fine quality, good tailoring, distinctive style. 



CARL, H. BOLTER 

correct MENS OUTFITTER exclusive 



Breakfast will be ready at 6-30 on Saturday morning. 

Drop in before you leave on the special. 



I 



INN 



SIDE LIGHTS 

"Kid" Gore started for Boston all 
alone on a special car last Friday amid 
the cheers of the team, but returned 
shortly aud did the political act ap- 
propriately from the rear platform of 
the car. 



•'Red" Mudgett thought the learn was 
staying at an Italian hotel when he 
misunderstood Professor Hicks tell of 
Hotel "Autonio". (Ansonia.) 



Four Two-year students were the first 
ones to greet the team upon its arival if 
the Stevens gymnasium. 



Several New York Alumni met the 
football players at the Oram! Central 
and showed their enthusiasm with a 
hearty welcome. 



Stevens could not drive the Aggie 
eleven down the field, so they attempted 
to smoke out the Aggie rooters by 
ineanB of a smudge behind ihc grand- 
stand. 



fo i a bunk la the sleeper, but found it 
did not work as well as the one under 
the "old apple tree ' 



The engineer who hitched fhe Aggie 
sleeper on to I he Montieal express, 
at Springfield must have been a log 
driver before entering on his present 
eareer. 



The Dartmouth sleeper was just be- 
hind the Aggie"s;so was I he result of 
their game with Cornell. 



TWO YEARS SHOW GOOD FORM 
AGAINST C. A. C. SECONDS 



Brievogcl. Sahlin, and Curtis put up a 
fine showing for their first game. Stover 
a'so played an extra good game on left 
end. 

The lineup : 
If, A. C Two-ykah Conn. Auoik 2ni» 



A Stevens man was heard to say, 
"(irayson is some fightiug lad." 



The plates at "Beefsteak Charlies" 
were one foot in diameter and even then 
the stake hung over the side. 



Some one remarked that the plates 
couldn't have beeu much larger with- 
out calling them platters. 



Stover, le 
Curtis, It 
Hastings, lg 
Am huse, c 
Uligh, rg 
Sahlin, rl 
Potter. it- 
Bangs, qb 
Baniit le. rhb 
Henry, lhb 
Breivogel, fb 



re, Badowilch 

rt, Johnson 

rg, Kyre 

c, Donahue 

lg, Malumphy 

It, Finnegau 

le, Seymour 

i|l>, Houston 

lhb, Sawyer 

rhb, Filniore 

fb, Kay lock 



Marx played a great game for bis titst 
in college football, and proved his ap- 
preciation by nailing a Stevens back for 
a seven-yard loss. 



Half the football team are planning 
to get jobs as stage hands in 'Follies". 



Things that never happened: l'rexy 
u'ives a 3-miuute speach at the New 
York Alumni Banquet. 



Abele mistook his clothes hammock 



Forward Pass Brings Touchdown, but 

Visitors Tally in Second Half, 

Making Score 11-6. 

In spile of the fait thai the two-year 
football team lost to Connecticut Aggie 
second team 11 tod last Saturday, they 
showed a strong and well developed of- 
lence which forced the visitors to the 
limit in their victory, it was by far 
the best brand of football displayed by 
<'apt. Bangs' team this year and showed 
that Coach Maginnis has done a lot ot 
careful work in bringing the team up 
to its present strength. 

The two-year men were first to score. 
when, after a few plays, Barnicle on 
the receiving end of a pass raced 70 
yards for a touchdown. The attempt 
at goal failed. In the second period 
the team showed some real power l>\ 
taking the ball and pushing it steadily 
trom their 15-yard line down the held 
to the Connecticut 10-yard line where 
the end of the hall presented another 

■eon. 

The Conn, scores resulted from a 
touchdown, safely, ami drop kick; the 
touchdown resulting also trom a for- 
ward pass. The safely was scored after 
the two-year men had held their op- 
ponents for two downs tin the ."i-yard 
line, and the ball ROtSf to the two-year 
was blocked on a [Mint and went out of 
bounds. The drop-kick was made from 
I very dillictill angle at ihe extreme 
•dgC of I fie Held. 

Barnicle played fine football, and 



Substitutions -Two-year: Adams for 
Curtis, Curtis for Bligh. 



TWO-YEAR NOTES 

The Two-year Seniors held a class 
meeting November 7 in the Social f'niou 
Rooms. Nominations were made for 
officers who will serve for t he remainder 
of I fie year. The ollieers will be elected 
November 21. 




The Two year Juniors held a class 
meeting after Assembly November ». 
They voted to elect a financial secretary 
and four assistants to fill the place of 
t|... treasurer who has resigned. 
Samuel Billings was elected liuaucial 
secretary. His four assistants will he 
selected by l'rofessor John I'helan and 
Ihe class president. 



The l'wo-y ear <;irl*' Club, HieS (' S . 
met November K and elected the 
following officers: president, Beatrice 
Kleyla of Soul b Deerlield ; vice-president 

vliee (. Inow of Alhol; secrelaiy. 

Klhei Putnam of Worcester ; I reasuier, 
Kunice Austin of Kail KtVOT. 



The Stamp of Quality- 
Rogers Pert ! 

Young men's suits and over- 
coats that measure up to the very 
highest standards of lahrics and 
tailoring. 

Prices moderate. 

KotiKxs Put CoMi'Afn 

Broadway Herald Square 

at 181 h SI "Four al tffith Si 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" KiftliAve. 

at Warren al 41st Hi. 

NBW vohk CITY 



The Best in 
Drug Store Merchandise 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Til* Box mil SU 



The S C. S. had a hot-dog roast a' 
Orient SpriiiL's last Sunday. Kit; tn 
couples left the Abbey at half-past one. 
Soon after I bey reached I heir desl i mil ton 
i hey bewail to make the hot- dofft 
disappear. Bolls, colfee, ct tillers, and 
maishinalloWN shared the fale of the 
hot <logs. Tin- parly sang for a while 
and returned to Ihe Abbey at tf-:5(l. 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management 

P. I). HOMANS, 

Prop. 
Tel. 489-W 



You can make your busy hours more joyful by having some of our selected 

Salted Nuts in your room. 
Salted Almonds galted Spanish Peanuts 

Salted Pistachios ^^ pecang 

The best ever put up 



Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Kitchen 



Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



7*1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, NovembeM^tm 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 15, 1*22. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the MassachutettB Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OK BDROB8. 



Ikvino W. 8.-M.K. -M BdUor-ln-rhlef 

I., iiikk It. AK.HN.n.-N '28 Managing Editor 
I > i : i- \ i : tmkn r II k \i»k: 
[anna w. si.ai.k ■« 

Al.BKHT E. WM 0M*M 
1,1 WIH II. Kk.iiii •• 

I.I I lll'.l! •■ AllKrSOloS '28 

J»B* O. BMktt "'-'I 
CHARbW r. <M.IM If. .In- ■« 

Hi i ii M. W< '24 

|„ I'KANOIS KKSNKI.Y '24 

.I,„in M. Willi tibk '28 



Bdrtortel. 

Atlllt'tlCM. 
A CMllt'Uli' H, 

Cannes. 



Faoaltfi 

Alumni. 
Two Year. 
Kxrhange and 

Consinonicatlong, Sac 



( l.MKN '28 



1UBINK8B DEPAKTMBKT. 

Ow«n K. Koi.som '28 Buiinei.M»n W .r 

RO..M K. nTSBSS '-'■' A'lvertUinn Manager 

CumWOU ItrmKN '24 Ctr.ulatlon Manager 

Do»au> W. i.k\ms-j.. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
oopie., 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
msnauer as soon as possible. 

Kntered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing- at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 1108 Act 
of October. 1917 authorised Aogutt 20. 1918. 



Time to Work. 
This must not go OS. Scholarship as 
shown by the Dess'l I*""" 1 ls at :l verv 
low ebb l« tb« IWO lower class and is 
nnM e too high l« ind Junior ami 
Senior class.-s. The Dean's Saturday, 
now oeruriim only once (hiring a term. 
is :1 veritable minor relleetinir the alti- 
tude ol Students toward their studies 
or the mental ability of some candi- 
dates for the deuree of Bachelor of 
Science. Kveiv opportunity for the 
,.,,, ,,,, ilation of a fair estimate of a stu- 
,|,. n , s work has been offered by the 
Dean's olViee in eliminating the first 
Dean's Botfd which was somewhat pre- 
mature ami was not based on a larue 
enouuh percenta-e of the ternrs work 
to be wholly true. But still, the low 
and below mades come in, showing 
that as far as the middle of the term, 
tbe student body DM nol buckled down 
to business. 

& preliminary survey of tBS work ol 
the Kieshn.en a few weeks ago was 
somewhat alannin". !0»Ott! of a total 
ot 1st) were low or bt low in one or more 
subjects. This RroBp of marks was 
based on one set of exami nal ions only 
and could reasonably have been due to 
Hi,, newness of the subject material and 
College svstem. Such sn explanation is 
justiliable when the latest record of tbe 
Freshman class is perused. The total 
number posted below is 111 Even 
though this record is better than lhat 
made by last years class al the same 
time there is little credit cast on the 
present Freshman class. 

The increasing percentage of those 
Banking from college must mean some- 
thing timre lhan mere neglect of 
studies. The scholarship of the two 
classes which have entered since the 
entrance requirements were made less 
stringent has been noticeably of a 
poorer quality than that of previous 
students, The system of 7 1-2 fixed 
credits with the remaining elective has 
amounted to a lowering of tbe stan- 
dards of the institution. The present 
difficulty may be due to this reason, al- 
though the step was probably neces- 
sary due to the pressure brought to 



bear upon college authorities to admit 
btgfa school students who were pre- 
pared according to the principles laid 
down by IBS stale board of education. 

It s< e d wrong that a high school 

graduate who had successfully com- 
pleted his required courses should be 
shut out of the colleges because of a 
failure to comply within a few points 
to the conditions deemed expedient for 
college grade work. Acting under this 
theory the entrance requirements were 
changed al M. A. 0. by those in charge. 
In themselves the points required 
would be sutlicient if II were not for 
tbe fact thai tb« average high school 
pupil is inadequately prepared in two 
main lines: Matbemaics and Knglish. 
It is the practice in high schools to 
pick for a mat hematics teacher a 
young college graduate who is aide and 
willing lo coach the various high school 
athletic teams. Most high schools are 
not allowed any money for such an 
athletic coach and this is the way la 
which tbe high school principal gets 
around the difficulty. Consequently, 
the mathematics department of most 
high schools is conducted by some 
poorly (rained teacher who has not 
prepared himself to teach the subject 
in question. When the high school stu- 
dent gels to college his defective train- 
ing comes to light and he has difficulty 
in getting along satisfactorily. 

Numerous English Departments of 
the Massachusetts high schools are also 
poof and inadequate. Emphasis is 
laid on the reading of English prose. 
Crammar and composition is sadly ne- 
glected, perhaps because of tbe fact 
that Latin is being removed from tbe 
curriculum of many high sdhools and 
in others Latin is entirely elective. 
The pupil who mastered Latin was 
forced to learn the fundamentals of 
grammar, ami these fundamentals ap- 
plied to English as well as other 
languages. This primary support re- 
moved, Hie high school student is left 
in a precarious position where English 
Departments are not organized lo take 
the place of Latin grammar drill. 

It is significant that those who 
llunked back into the class of 1020 from 
the preceding class are all or nearly all 
very low in their studies. M. A. C. 
has always given students a second 
chance even though there is a move- 
ment on loot in many colleges to pre- 
vent such a procedure, l'res. Hopkin- 
son of Dartmouth has found that only 
a very small percentage of those read- 
mitted make good. The experience at 
this college substantiates the conclu- 
sion. 

As a result of questionable prepara- 
tion a difficult situation is presented to 
(be college professors. In some, cases, 
are tbej not forced to lower their stan- 
dards to let students by » They cannot 
think the whole class, but only a cer- 
tain percentage whether a much larger 
percentage deserves it or not. Some- 
times a large number of failures casts 
reflections on the professor's teaching 
ability or it is misconstrued as such. 
How can this problem be solved in face 
of tbe circumstances? 

A great number of students have the 
wrong attitude at tbe present time. If 
a man with a good reputation as a stu- 
dent receives low marks the average 
student gives up, saying "If a smart 
fellow cannot comprehend this, I surely 
cannot." Many students are greally 
comforted by the fact that everyone 
is slow. Where does individual initia- 
tive and personal ambition enter, if 
everyone is content lo follow the 
crowd? Success is not measured by 
the average, but by the exceptional. 
Woik for the exceptional and make 
your college course worth while! 



COMMUNICATION 

November 4, IMS. 
To niK El»lTOIt OF tiik Coi.i.koian : 

The following action, voted upon ami 
placed on record, wai taken by the nf. 

A. ('. (Tub of Boston at its smoker 

Oct. 2*. 

(1) The M. A. C. Club of Boston is 
wholly in MOOrd with the directing and 
coaching of athletics at M. A. (J. as 
shown in the pant and at the present 
time; it stands wholeheartedly behind 
Director Hicks and Coach Gore of tbej 
Athletic Department, and has faith 
that they grill accomplish in tbe future 
the excellent work they have done in 

the past. 

(2) The Boston Club is not In accord 
wilh the remarks made by L. M. Lyons 

•18 as appeared la the Oct. tttn issue of 
the Alumni lloUvtiu in reference to tbe 
over-stressing of athletics at M. A. 0. 

(8) The Boston Club approves of in- 
tense participation in athletics, both as 
a spirited spectator and as a contestant, 
thus creating spirit, health, pride, en- 
thusiasm, courage and fight- factors 
thai are major requisite to successful 
after-college life. 

The Alumni Club of Boston respect- 
fully requests that the above action be 
printed in full in the next issue, or as 
soon after as possible, of tbe Com-k- 

OIAN. 

Respectfully yours, 
LoriH W. Boss, Secretary. 



Town Hall, Amherst 
Thursday I JEffifc W D.ir . I 

House," 7 reels, from the 
Play by Henrik Ibsen, one of 
the most discussed plays in | 
modern literature. 

Newt Comedy 



Mat. 3, Kv*. 
6.45. 8-30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Eva. 
6.45. 8-30 



Srturday 



Irene Castle and Ward 
Crane In "No Trespassing." 

fiom the story. "The l; is.- of 
Roaeos I'aine." by Joseph 
Lincoln. The action takes 
place in New York < ity and a 
pictureH<|iie town in Capet od 

Sport Review on Golf. 
"Fort" 

2-reel Century Comedy 



Ethel Clayton anil Vernon 
Steel* in "For the De- 
fense," from the stage hit 
b* Klmer Klee. Tbe superla- 
tive in suspense! With tbe 
«„► 1 v„* i most daring and amazing 
Mat. J. r.ve. ,. H|uax ever conceived. 

6-45. 8-30 News 

2 reel Century Comedy 



Monday 



Mat. 3. Kvc 
6-45 8-0 



■••d's thrilling 
Sign of the 

with 



Myrtle 
story. "At the _ 

iach-o'-Lontern," 
etty Ross Clark. 
Round 2 of "The Leather 
Pushers." Snapshots 



"BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. I-. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.t16-W) Hadlej. 



SOPHS AND FRESHMEN FIGHT 
TO SCORELESS TIE TUESDAY 



Wet Field and Weak Offenae of Both 
Teams Account for No Score. 



For the first time in the memory of 
those now in College the annual Fresh- 
man-Sophomore football game resulted 
in | scoreless tie. Tbe game was 
played in a drizzling rain, and tbe field 
was in bad condition, but both teams 
were on an even basis. It was a stub- 
born game, both teams choosing to 
plunge tbe line, rather than risk passes. 
The punting on both sides was not ex- 
ceptional, although Ferranti for the 
Sophomores was booting tbe oval for 
forty yards toward the end of the game. 
From the first kick-off, in which tbe 
Sophs kicked, the Freshmen fumbled 
the ball and a Soph recovered on tbe 
forty yard line. From then until near- 
ly the end of the game the ball was 
kept constantly in the Freshman terri- 
tory, and several times their goal was 
threatened, but the defense put up by 
the yearlings was strong enough lo 
hold their opponents for downs and 
they quickly punted out of danger. 

Tbe ground was wet and very slip- 
pery, and whenever a player attempted 
to reverse his field or dodge a man be 
would sit down. Much ground was 
lost this way particularly by the Soph- 
omores, as they tried numerous end 
runs, which resulted in no gains the 
majority of the times. 

From his fast work on the wet field 
there is no doubt but that t'ahill would 
have proved a bad man on a broken 
Held if the ground had been in dry 
shape, while Fish, playing fullback for 
the Sophs gained time after time by 
plowing with his head up. He would 
have made more yardage bad he kept 
down and been in better condition. He 
is fast getting into trim on Team C. 

At least twice tbe Freshmen had a 
chance to gain al least 15 yards by long 
forwards, but because of the inability 
of their men to connect they were 
grounded harmlessly. Tbe work of Gray- 



For Rent ! 

Two newly decorated adjoining 
furnished 

ROOMS 

with 
lavatory and private entrance. 

21 PLEASANT ST. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher nf Dancing. 

Studio-MASONH HUM K- Northampton. 

Club Night Dances-popular with M. A. V. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone TCI Northampton 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Eevry thing All "Write" Here 




no matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or Hie 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quanti'y. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Feus, 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc 
Every article is warranted, and our 
prices are as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. OYER 





ARSHMAN 

ARX 

YRICK 

UDUKTT 

OHKK 

cGKOCH 



CIIKSK Mini other** equally as good as you well know will want 
your support. BEAT TUFTS, but first eall at "TUB HOUSE 
OF WALSH" lor Suits, Overcoats and Furnish. mis. 

More than a Toggery — 
A College Institution. 



son and Cormier in the back field fur the 
'26 aggregation was i-oinmendable, and 
Jones' work at tackle was good. 

Both teams ha<l a strong defensive 
but a very weak offensive, and this is 
doubtless the reason why the game 
resulted in a tie. There will not be 
another game between the two teams. 

The lineup: 



PROF. WINSLOW OF YALE 

ON PUBLIC HEALTH WORK 



BOPHOMOBBJ 

Zwisler, re 
(ileason, rt 
■fnaradlnn, rg 

Taylor, c 
White, Qordon, lg 
Marx, It 
Hale, Lord, le 
Holbiook, <|h 
Ferranti, rhb 
Fish, fb 
Cahill, Ibb 

Referee, Gray sou. 



rtHIMI 1 
le, Baeklej 

It, Tulenko 

lg, Thurlow 

c, Wade 

rg, Gavin 

rt. Jones 

re, Sbedd 

<|1>, nfoberg 

Ibb, Qaatarnnn 

fb, Cormlai , White 

rhb, Qrayann 

Umpire, Maker 



Timer, Giles. Head linesman, Alger. 
Time, four 10-minule periods. 



REV. HERBERT J. WHITE '87 
IS SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKER 

"The Stewardship of Life" was the 
subject of a timely and inspiring sermon 
delivered in last Sunday's Chapel by 
Hev. Herbert J. White, pastor of the 
First Baptist Church of Hartford, Conn. 
and a graduate of M. A. C. in the 
class of '87. 

Kev. White read as a text from tbe 
26th chapter of Matthew, where the 
reward of tbe "good and faithful ser- 
vant" who made the most of tbe few 
talents given bim is emphasized. "The 
modern pulpit is no longer preaching 
soul salvation as the keynote to life, 
but salvation through stewardship, 
which is defined as being the adminis- 
tering of an estate for another. Jesus 
was the greatest steward; his life was 
administered unto God's people. 

"Are we going to meet life's oppor- 
tunities with the idea of getting all we 
can lo hold for ourselves? Emerson 
said, 'America is the place of great op- 
portunity—opportunity to serw'. Ma- 
terial things do not go with us after 
death, but if we realize that the great 
opportunities of life are not ours, but 
to be administered in the glotiftaltlon 
of God's kingdom here on earth, we 
develope those finer ideals of character 
'hat can go with us in the world to 
>'iime, 

"It is when we are thankful to God 
'or the blessings he has given us to 
administer in His name that we recog- 
nize our true relation to Him and our 
fellow men. Giving of our wealth to 
( »od is really administering money that 
- His for tbe physical and spiritual up- 
aft of His people. Tbe prodical son 
who returns home after a riotous life 
realizes that the happiest life is one 

nsecrated in service. 

"In considering our life's work let us 

member that we are our Father's 

► wards, and therein lies tbe greatest- 
i >y and reward of all living." 

Tbe next issue of World Agriculture 
^ill be the "Dry-Farming" issue, and it 
v ill appear during tbe holidays. 



At Assembly Telia of its Develop- 
ment and Primary Objects. 

Professor C. U. Winslow of the 
Department of Public Health at Vale 
University spoke at Assembly last 
Thursday. His subject was "Tbe 
Development of Public Health Work." 

"The public health movement," 
Professor Winslow said, "began fifty 
years ago in Kngland. It was then 
what many people now think it is-(he 
cleaning up of surroundings. There 
have been four phases of publie health 
work. The first was the phase of 
sanitary engineering. By bettering 
their sanitary conditions tbe countries 
of the world have become able toeontiol 
the plagues which formerly swept over 
them. 

"The second phase was tbe 
bacteriological phase. Men began lo 
find out that a great many diseases were 
transmitted by means of bacteria. 
'Carriers' were studied: vaccination 
was developed. The knowledge of 
bacteria which scientists acquired has 
enabled tbem practically to wipe out 
several diseases, typhoid for example. 
Many diseases caused by bacteria are 
not as yet under control. Today 
tuberculosis is engaging the attention 
of medical men. 

"Third came the educational phase. 
Personal hygiene was taught in schools 
and in homes by public health nurses. 
Preventative medicine developed. 
Cities, slates, and nations began to 
concern themselves with the work. In 
most of the cities the work has 
developed rapidly, but the rural 
districts are in great need of public 
health workers. 

"The fourth phase of public health 
work was concerned with the 
organization of tbe medical service. 
Finding that tbe fields of preventative 
and curative medicine were beginning 
to overlap, physicians of hot Ii branches 
began to realize that neither could do 
its best work alone. They began to 
cooperate. 

"Everyone who has any knowledge of 
public health work realizes that in the 
future development of this two matters 
are of primary importance. First, there 
must be an increase in tbe number of 
public health workers. At present 
there is a lack of personnel. Second, 
every citizen must be impressed with 
his individual responsibility for seeing 
that public health work goes forward." 



TAG DAY MONDAY NETS 

GOODLY SUM FOR BAND 

The Tag Day, which was held on 
Monday lo raise money that tbe band 
might be sent to tbe Tufts game, was a 
huge success. Besides the 20 men from 
tbe four year classes who sold the little 
red ribbons. tbe mem hers of the Two-year 
Student Council canvassed the men in 
the two-year course. 

There were approximately 700 rib- 
bons sold to members of the student 
body and faculty, netting about $100 in 
all. 



FRESHMAN DEBATING TEAM 
CHOSEN FOR SALEM DEBATE 

At the trial debate held last week, 
the four members of the Freshman de- 
lating team were chosen: Flint P. 
Dodge, TheodoreS. Grant, Leo Novlck, 
and Oscar Rogers. These men will still 
compete with one another to determine 
who the three speakers will be. The 
coach re porta the learn are being very 
enthusiastic. The men are showing 



good speaking ability and keen think- 
ing, which augures well for their de- 
bate with Salem High .School on De- 
cember Hth. 



Chompsoif sOmelyC a,ks 

Tilt- ( nl hiii lila OrephophOM < < > ■ > 1 1 >: 1 1 1 > lias put 
a new r ecord on the inaiki-i wlilch doM away 
with all gartace noises. OOSM In ami listen to 
the new records and hear for )oihncIy«s. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 

Honry Jmwmtt'm Rmpmrtory Compmnv 

— IN — 



Nov. 1(1, 17. Kves. Only ; Nov. Is. Mat.. Kve. 

" Pygmalion," 

Ity (i eorge Id- maul Hhnw. 



Nov. JO. 21, 22. K\ filings < inly 
•Hedda CabUr" 

I In- Subtle Drama by llenrlk Ibsen. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlulan nnd Jeweler 

9 Pleasant Street (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Hig Hen A larm Clocks and other Keltable Makes 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Trices. 
Informmlm m Specially 

12 So. Prospect St.. Amherst, Mass 

Tml. ASS -Af 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing, Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning' and Dyeing 

tin) jour pressing ticket from It. (ium/.ue '28 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

nfcessary fixings. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Hornm Brom. Meckwmar 

Order your next Suit or Overcoat here now. 
Ilest sflfitlons of Woolens in the latest i ... t 
terns always on hand. The high uuallty of our 
work Is appan-nt on fancy garments Try us! 



Taller and Haberdasher. 

11 AnittyHt. Next to Western Union Tel. office 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 

Amateur Oevmloplng mud Printing 

Hills Studio -Phone 456-1 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 

GIVE YOU QUALITY WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE 

You may pay so little for clothes that they're really expensive; and, 
of course, you can pay so much that they're extravagant. There's a 
middle ground, and we've found it when we sell the world's finest 

clothes for 

$30.00 to $50.00 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Home of Hart Schaffner & M«rx Clothes. 






The Massachusetts Collegian^ Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wed nesday , Thurs- 

day, Saturday. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 

I -ri, lay, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 

your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 

H. J- DUWELL, Proprietor. 

IT'SA HAPPY FEELINGJSN'TIT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



MR. JOHN B. HANNA SPEAKS 
AT CHAPEL ON WORLD PEACE 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

tOf (irst -class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant SI., Amherst. ||«M. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suitt made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 

Raincoat* 
suit* nmifT MiiitaiN Tailoring 



Says Armistice Day, Four Years 
After Peace, Finds Us Again Pre- 
paring for War. 

[oebapel, Friday morning, Mr. John 
B. llanna ■pokaon lbs possibilities of 

World peace In vlSW Of i lie ol.servalH •»■ 

of Saturday, Nov. n, as armistice Day. 

four years RgO In every land mens 
hearts were bursting with j".V til 'he 

approaching dawn ol peace with the 
rotation of hostilities In Prauee. 

Today what a change ! Wariaagalu 
brewing In the hearts of man. Euro- 
pean statesmen ale already weighing 

tbelrohancei in the next world strug- 
gle. Indeed, A imistiee Day is now a 
time when troops, martial music and 
,, rat, ,is kindlfl the wild lire of patri- 
otism. 

That our past efforts may not ha\e 
been in vain, we must not in Self- 

aggrandlaemeat prevent fntara world 
peace. Wa must aof forget that till 

people* are aiike in emotional ie- 

•ponaaa and thai thej reeogaiae m 

Miitially one God. 

II we are working for a common end 
in lilt- then we cannot arouse hatred 
agalaal each other through overesti- 
mated pride. 

In short, we must affect a mental dis- 
armament among nations that a world 

government i»y tb« ] pla, of the peo- 

pit and for the people shall not perish 
from the minds ol men 



SENIOR CLASS MEETING 

The Seniors, at a meeting held after 
assembly last Thursday, elected Mark 

Richardson as manager ol luterelasa 

baaketball. D. B. Alexander takes the 

place of K. W\ Bldredgeon the Smoker 

Committee, and U. S. Ilo.lscloii and W. 
II. Marslnnan were elected to the Inter- 
class Athletic Association. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 1925 



NEXT SUNDAY CHAPEL 

\t chapel next Sun-lay morning Dr. 

Albert Parker Fitch, professor at Aiu- 

beret College, will glet the address, 
id. Fitch is too well known hereto need 

;ll , introduction. lie is rated. perhaps, 
as on.- of the most noted speakers in the 
Country and has had MBg experience on 

the platform and is an orator of tmie. 
BIBLE DISCUSSION GROUPS 

The two courses (dieted l>> the M. A. 
< . Christian Association under the 

leaderabipof Mr. llanna and Mr. Ward 

are proving worthwhile to the ie-pec- 

tivc groupi which are diaeuaeing them. 

Mr. Ward 1 ! group laharlUg interesting 
diacuaaloaa of the "Bible* 1 every Thurs- 
day Bight in Memorial Hall. Iff Hen- 
na's group is learnini; many extremely 
Valuable facts about '•Christianity and 
Ike Industrial Iteconsl I UCl ion" al the 
same lime in French Hall. More BtU- 

denta would be welcomed by tlmelaeees 
at iheee hour discussions every week. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - ■ MaM 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 



it 



OV8B U>4HV l>i:t «■ WOMC 



The Period of Thrift 

The periods of di-«overy ami pioneer- 
ing in Ihe dalrj industry are largely 

past and the rewarded prosperity arc 

fur those who today faithfully practice 
industry and thrift. 

Among Ibeaa met bode ol thrift and 

economy none are of mole vital import- 
ance than the safe. swed. wholesome 
sanitary cleanliness which ihe USC "t 

Wya7Fdo//e, 



so consistently provides to an Increasing 
number of aucceaafnl dairies, creameries 

and cheese lactones. 

This distinctive Wyandotte cleanli- 
BOM is the hasis of thrill and economy 

in dairy production for it is s,. unusually 

efficient in its natural cleaning action, 
is so thoroughly yet simply applicable, 

is s,. uniform in its distinctive quality, 
is so protect ire of high quality milk 
products, is so harmless lo the hands 
and to metal equipment, and eoata so 
little that every particle to the last grain 
in the barrel beapeaki thrift for the 

dairy industry. 

Indian in 
circle 



Order from 
your supply house. 



AGGIE HARRIERS RUNNING 
IN INTERCOLLEGIATES NOV. 18 

Friday night the Cross Country team 
w ill leave lor Boston where it 
will participate in the Intercollegiate 
run held in Franklin I'ark Satur.iav 
morning. In the afternoon the men 
will take in ihe aggle-Tufti game at 
Medtord. 

While there is no special puked team 

going the eh ancea of placing are good 

and the coach is optimistic about the 
results. Seven men will make the trip: 



ROISTER DOISTER TRYOUTS 

Tryouts for the two one-act plays 
which the Bolster Bolsters are present- 
ing :u the AggiS llevievv on Dec. lo. 

have bees h. id and the easts chosen as 

follows : 

Ihe Medicine Show-hy Stuart Walker. 

(Bar— •James b. Kiihoume "24. 
Lut'er— H. Brie Watherwa* '24. 

Dr. I'endcxier-t Icon II. Johnson '2o. 

ihe Maker of Dreams by OHpbant 

Down. 

Pierrot Carroll A. Towns f*. 

Pierrette Frances 1$. Martin 23. 

Ihe Manufacturer-Bobert F. Martin '23 



PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Prominent Anionic the 
nusteus Makes We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

U a K<««<1 ISMS for women WBS want the best 

there Is tn a seamless stoeklna that yet 

will tit KB* ankles tiimly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Captain Mact ready . Hill. Tanner and 1NTERCLASS TRACK MEET 

[Mae have already been chosen 




and J 

three of the following will go, Burboe, 
U>rlng, Newell, Bates, Tisdale or 

llallell. Stevenson will be Unable to 
lake pari in this meet and his ahsence 
will he keenly felt. However, the team 

is in good condition and is expected to 
do well at Boston. 

PROFESSOR WAUGH TALKS TO 
LANDSCAPERS ON GARDENS 

Bi-Weekly Meetings for Club Sched- 
uled for Winter Term. 
The Landscape Club held a business 

and social meeting OS Wednesday last. 
Nov. 8, al 7 P. m. in French Hall, l! 
was voted to hold a meet tag every two 
weeks during the winter, ami a 

committee was appointed to get speakers 

for each occasion. 

Aftertbe business meeting Professor 

VTaugh nave a practical lantern-slide 

lecture upon gardens. There is a great 

ileal of enthusiasm being shown in the 
Club and the inemlieis expect good 
results in the line of Speakers from 
t he committee. 

The next meeting will he held on 
Wednesday. Nov. '12. 



SCHEDULED FOR NOV. 25 

A few weeks age some illusion was 
made in these colums to an inter-class 
uack meet to he held in the near 
inline. The date has practically bees 

set for Nov. -2.-th ami will probably 

take the nature of a handicap meet. 
The Freshmen entering will hi given a 
BMMZOUa handicap. Men will start 
„u scratch. Scoring will he live, three. 
,,ne. according to place. Also numerals 

will be awarded for those placing tiist 

and second, in any of the events. 



NDVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prom ply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Saw monej by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 

Tel. 9-J 



in every 
package 

* The J. B. Ford Co.. Sole Manufacturers. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



HARRY STARR 

Harry Starr of Harvard made his sec- 
ond annual appearance before the M. A. 
< . Menorafa Society Sunday morning, 
Nov. 4. 'Ihe nature of his talk was 
rather a profound treatise on the Amer- 
icanization problem. Mr. Starr, him- 
self a speaker and orator of note, told 
the members of the situation of the 
country in its regard to die immigration 
question. His address, in hrief, was 
aimed al the stoical American back- 
groUUd, which, the speaker claimed, 
hindered I he progress of the alien. In- 
stead ol en velopinu the foreigner into 
1 the enviionment ot the aristocratic set. 
I he is more or less looked down upon 

smith Isteaebiag science eren though be la In most cases a man 

>f learniag and appreciation. After the 




'22 — "Al 

and mathematics a' Smith Academy- o. ., m ,, 

He is also coaehtag athletics and doing meeting the members asked questions 

, ,, I _* . 1.., ..,..,.. V ..r for a ahorl while. 

it very successl ully 



of the speaker for a short while. 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

The bowling alleys will be open very soon, so 
drop in and let us refresh you between games. 



FACULTY NOTES 

The diagnostic work of tbs college in 
veterinary science will he in charge of 
Dr. Norman J. 1'yle. who comes to 
M. A. C. as assistant research i releasor 

in avian pathology. He has bees con- 
nected with the research department of 
a commercial house. He received his 
professional training at the University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Dean Machmer addressed a combined 
meeting of the Deckel anil Derkshire 
Pomona (iranges held in Beckel last 
Thursdry evening. His suhject was 
"Your Own State College. " 

In the current issue of S'imiul E'lmn- 
rfosia an article by Prof. W. K. Hart <>n 
"Visualized Education." It considers 
visual education from the Statad point 
of the college student. 

I'rof. Waugh lias writ ten a discussion 
in the fJcaeel and Society magasine 
for Nov. 4 entitled. 'A Standardised 

World." 

Professor Grose is engaged in (dealing 
up the damage done in ihe college 
forest by the storms of last winter. 
Part of the wood is being sold to mem- 
bers of the faculty. Some fence posts 
are also being cut. The work is I. cine 
directed by the permanent ranger, Dan 
Mel 'ready, and in addition there ate 
several choppers working. 

Station Seminar. 

The next seminar of the Experiment 
station staff will be held Monday even 
ing Nov. 20. (ieorge D. Darrow of the 
(Jailed States Department of Agricul- 
ture will speak on "Our Native Fruits M 
Mr. Dai row is a specialist, and is en- 
deavoring to bring into more general 
culture the batter varieties. 

Our own station is doing a consider- 
able amount of work with native fruits. 
At the Craabury Sub-station, Dr. II. J. 
Franklin, '03 is experimenting with 
cranberries, and also with blueberries. 
The blueberry plantation contains a 
number of new varieties produced by 
Dr. Coville of Washington. 

The viburnum is being developed as 
a possible substitute for the currant. 
A large n tun her of native fruits are 
being studied by the landscape depart 
meut to determine their value as orna- 
ment plants. 

President Attends Fifth Country- 
Life Conference. 

President Buttertield was al Columhia 
('Diversity Nov. 9, 10, and 11, attending 
the fifth annual conference of the Amer- 
ican Country Life Association, of which 
he is president. The subject of the con- 
ference, was "The Education of the 
Country Community." Many disting- 
uished speakers addressed the gather- 
ing, treating the subject from many 
angles. 

STUDENT FORUM THIS WEEK 

At assembly, Nov. 10, there will be a 
Student forum. The Honor System 
lias had much local discussion of laic. 
Save up your ideas about it and present 
iliem for discussion at this time. 



c-*- 



Smith College girls appear more in- 
terested in rowing than Harvard men, 
judging by recent statistics. At Smith. 
Die number of shells restricts the crew 
to the upper two classes. Forty per- 
cent of these are out for the crews, 
while in Harvard only twenty-one per- 
cent of those who may row do bo. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

From all reports, there tniisi have 

been at least one absent minded pro- 
fessor present at the faculty dame lasl 
Friday evening, for tbs tap on the eider 

keg was left open and a fair proportion 
of t he « tents found ils way "dow n one 

Bight." 



The annual reception of Hie two- 
year juniors to I he seniors w as held lasl 

Saturday evening in the memorial Build- 
ing. Befresbments were eerved and lbs 
entertaining • tinned from 7 80 to 11 

I*. m. Mr. ami Mrs. I'helan, Miss Ham- 
lin ami Miss .Skinner vveie present as 

ehapeioiies. 

Plans are now under way in the iwo- 
year course foi the publishing of a two- 
year annual, describing t be activities .a 
theeiass. tfo regular committee has yet 

been selected to handle the hook, hut 

Armstrong aad Swauson are Investiga- 
ting the possibilities before electing a 

hoard lo take Ihe work in band. 

Midwinter Alumni Day. 
The Senate has appointed a < mil- 

tce to lake charge ol Midwinter \liimni 

Day, Jan. 20, with Trescotl abele, '88, 

W. \V Wood 24 and W. Love, '2.*., as 
members. 



The Junior Class will hold a class 
meeting inn (lately alter Assoiiildy 

tomorrow to rote on tbs Index charac- 
ters. 

Agronomy Department. 
Mr. M. »>. Lampber, 'IS, who was 

employed on the Mate Soli Survey in 
Worcester County I his slimmer has re- 
turned to lake up his duty as Instruc- 
tor. 



A forced ventilation system wsa re- 
cently installed in StockbridgC Hall, 
designed for the purpose ol retaining 
cold air. 



World Agriculture. 

At Ihe recent annual meeting of the 
World Agricultural Society ihe previous 
officers were reelected. The society con- 
sists now of gfiOO members, Quo! which 
are held representatives in various coun- 
tries. The affiliated bodies ol the so- 
ciety are : 
Old Bureaus i 

Bureau of Illustrative Material. Prof. 
L. W. Barnes. 

Bureau of International Correepoud- 
•nee. 

Bureau of agricultural Servlee. 

New Put cans: 

Bureau of International Research. 

Director S. B. Haskill. 

Bureau of Travel. Prof, w. Welles. 
Bureau of Publicity. Louis Lyons. 

Bureau ol Beading Courses and Loan 

Libraries, C. B. Oreen. 



Extension Service. 
The Extension Service Nets* which 
has just come out contains some in- 
teresting facts In regard lo poultry rais- 
ing. Apparently, poultry raising is the 
most popular suhject for home study 
among farmers ami "farmer^ i u -t he- 
making." The foregoing vertify the 

fact. In Massachusetts out of .">:'.') stu- 
dents taking correspondence courses, 
Igg ebose poultry. The junior poultry 
club of the State consists of MOO boys 
and girls, leading all theclubsof simi- 
lar nature. 



Over a doaen men from the Alpha 

Sigma Phi fraternltj enjoyed a hike to 

Ml. Tol.ey lasl Sunday. Ihe troupe 

started oo their way Immediately after 

the conclusion ol ( hapcl Seiviecs. A 
palatable dinner was served at ihe ca\e. 

which waa enjoyed by all, The men re- 
turned at .v::u r u. 

Put lire issues of the Kxtenmion Set 

rlr, A, irs will In- .lev d to P.i-t tiles. 

Potatoes, Fruit, and Dairying, each is- 
sue being a number treating a single 

topic. 



ALUMNI 

Alumnus of Note. 
Dr. Plank Hunter Zabrlskle died at 

his home in ( .leeulit Id oil Oclohcl 2.">. 

ol pneumonia and com pi leal lone. In. 

Zahriskie has been a practicing 

physician in fireeufleld for more ti 

88 years, and was a shrewd ami 
capable diagnostician. He waa born In 
in.v.i in Noiioik. \'a: and received his 
early education In V V. City. Paler he 

studied al M. A. < and the College ol 



Physicians and Surgeons In New York. 
'SB. Edwin West Alien is Cble( of 
ihe Office oi Experiment stations at 
Washington, D. < . After receiving ins 
P. S. degree from M. A C. and from 
Boston University, Dr. Allen studied at 
ihe [Jnlverslt] "t Hot i luges, from which 

he received his Ph. D. in 1890, Soon 
afterward lie entered the service id the 
United States Department ol Vejicul- 

luie. Besides being Chief of t ha Office 
of Experiment Biationa, he is edltor-fe- 
chieioithe Experiment Station Record, 

'II. Newton Dealing has heen con- 
lined iii ihe Bobert Brig bam Hospital 
tor the past year, and will he there lor 
some time to come, D any Ay^ic men 

are ill Boston at any lime, he will he 
glad to have them drop in. He will 
appreciate let lels also. 

'HP— II. A. Mosiiom, who has been 
teacher oi science at Essex (bounty \j;ii- 

CUltUral School, has heen plol'ioleil lo 

ihe position oi agricultural manager, 

'20 Ml ami Mrs D. W. Pclchel of 

Hatfield are the parents of a son bora 



Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS 




SHOE EEPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 
Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed. $--2S 

Men's whole Neoltn soles with rubber heels, sewed, i.oo 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed. - - 1.70 

Rubber heels ol any kind, 50 ets per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are (ioodvear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Atbletie Goods 



Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 15, 1922. 




Cold weather is coming and that means overcoats-get yours early while the selection is complete. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 

Complete Outfitters. 



recently. Mr. Belcher is teaching ■!**- 
culture at (Smith Academy. 

11.— Nathan Gillette returned from 
bis honeymoon last week and spent a 
few days in Amherst. His new home 
is in Lynniield Center. 

"22.— Eddie Warren has returned to 
take up graduate work in Botany. 

•».— 11. M. Holman spent the last 
week on the campus and with"Stubby" 
Clark in Sunderland. "Dyna" has a 
new position as orchardist in northwest 
Michigan, at which he starts work in 
March or April. Until that time he 
will work fttOUMl Boston. 

"22. — Margaret l'erry was in town on 
Friday visiting her mother. Miss IVuy 
is an instructor at MacDonald College in 
Quebec and been accepted by MaCill 
University to work for a Masters de- 
gree. 

"2'2.— Alexander Crawford and Abra- 
ham Krasker are teaching at Kssex 
County Agricultural School. 



GRADUATE CLUB HOLD DANCE 

The Graduate Club held a dance last 
Saturday evening from eight-thirty till 
twelve. About twenty couples at- 
tended. Excellent music was furnished 
by Woodworth'B orchestra. The pa- 
trons ami patronesses were Dr. and Mrs. 
Marshall, Dr. and Mrs Itano, and Pro- 
fessor ami Mrs. Machmer. The dance 
was a success in all respects. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKAI.KK8 IN 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



FLOWER SHOW 

Continued from r>a«e 1 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG 

$1.00 



BOOK 



Ode to Posture. 

Good posture is an asset 
Which very few possess; 
Sad to relate, the favored ones 
Seem to be growing less. 

We see the folks around us 
AM slumped down in a heap, 
And the way that people navigate 
Is enough to make you weep. 

Some elevate their shoulders, 
Some hollow in their backs. 
Some stiffeD up their muscles, 
And some just plain relax. 

The one who walks with grace and poise 
Is a spectacle so rare, 
That even down on gay Broadway 
The people turn and stare. 

If you would cut a figure 
In business, sport, or school, 
Just mind the Posture precepts, 
Obey the Posture rule. 
Don't thrust your hands out turtle-wise 
Don't bunch your shoulders so ; 
Don't sag, and drag yourself around ; 
No style to that, you know. 

Gel uplift in your bearing, 

Anil strength and spring and vim ; 

No matter what your worries, 

To slouch won't alter them. 

Just square your shoulders to the world, 

You're not the sort to quit, 

"It isn't the load that breaks us down, 

It's the way we carry it." 

Miss Jeau Kennedy of Mount Hol- 
yoke spoke at a meeting of the Y. W. 
CJA. last Sunday evening. Miss Ken- 
nedy went as a representative of the 
Y. W. C. A. of this section of the United 
States to the conference of the World 
Student Christian Federation at Peking. 
China last spring. The Y. W. C. A. 
had as guests for the meeting and the 
supper preceding it Miss Skinner. Miss 
Hamlin, Miss Diether, Mrs. John 
Phelan.and Mrs. Joseph Chamberlain. 

The Metawampe Club has put a new 
floor in their cabin on Ml. Toby and 
painted up the fireplace in preparation 
for their Annual Trek on Dec. 16, when 
they will use the cabin as a slopping 
place. 



The FSertote' Hschumje, were won by C. 
V. Hill '24 for his bowl and vase ar- 
rangement, and by Kverett Moulton of 
the Two-year class in Commercial Flor- 
iculture for bis basket of flowers. 

The Uolyoke and Northampton Flor- 
ists' and Gardeners' club bad several 
excellent exhibits, from such establish- 
ments as Butler & Ullman of Northamp- 
ton, Galli van Brothers of Holyoke,Keyes 
and Son of Florence, G. H. Sinclair of 
Holyoke, Smith College Greenhouses, 
ami Mi. Holyoke Greenhouses. 

Mr. LeMoull, whose son is in the Two- 
year course at college, brought a bridal 
bouquet to the show from New York, 
where he owns a florist shop. 

Special mention should be made of 
the large exhibit and great variety of 
small-rlowered mums sent up by Charles 
H.Tottyof Madison. N. J., one of the 
leading growers of the country. These 
made a very important addition to the 
whole Bhow. 

The greenhouses of the college were 
also open foi inspection during the 
three days, and had their'party colors" 
on to greet the crowds of visitors. Tho 
good stand of large 'mums, a house full 
of them, attracted much attention, and 
were seen to good advantage from a 
platform built specially for the purpose. 
The management feels well satisfied 
with the popularity the show bad this 
year, especially as to the number of 
visitors. It is hoped that the whole- 
hearted backing of the public will ex- 
tend through to next year, that this 
annual affair may be made an institu- 
tion of high standing and character at 
M. A. C.,— a place where the public 
may enjoy some of the benefits of the 
college. 



At the Treasurer's Office 

$1.10 by mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 "P- 
See them in our window 



J£ 



hoe 



tore 



Old Deerfield Fertili 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfiel d, Mam 

C&rp*ivter & Morehouse, 
PRINTERS, 



No i. Cook Place. 



Amherst. Mas* 



Page & Shaw Candies 



WESLEYAN BEATEN 

Continued from p»*e 1 



management for the way in which the 
course was mapped out, both sides 
bavin* no difficulty in following the 
markers placed at short intervals. 
The field finished as follows; 
First, Smith of Wedeyan ; second, 
MacCready of H. A. C; third* Norton 
of Wesleyan; fourth. Tanner of M. A. C; 
fifth. Bill of M. A. C; sixth, Isaac of 
M. A.O.: seventh, Flosdorf of Wesleyan ; 
eighth. Severance of Wesleyan; ninth, 
Giffordof M. A.C.; tenth, Wheeler of 
Wesleyan. 

WELSH CHOIR CONCERT 

Continued from p»g« 1 

The program concluded with the 
singing of "Hand of My Fathers, the 
Welsh National Anthem and My 
Country 'Tis of Thee," during both of 
which the audience arose. 



Assorted Chocolates $1.25 per pound 

Assorted Nut Chocolates $1.25 per pound 

Assorted Bitter Sweet Chocolates, Page & Shaw, $1.00 

Assorted Bonbonettes, Page & Shaw, $1.00 

Page & Shaw Classic Creams, $1.50 per pound 

Page & Shaw Candies of the Golden West, $1.50 per pound 

Picadilly Package, Page ft Shaw, $4.00 

Fifth Avenue Package, Page ft Shaw, $5.00 

Page & Shaw Scotchee, 20 cts. and 40 cts. 

Lowell & Covel Creams, $1.00 per pound 

Lowell & Covel Special, $1.25 per pound 

Huyler's Candies, $1.20, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 per pound 

Peanut Brittle, bulk, 40 cts. per pound 

Glace Peanuts, bulk, 60 cts. per pound 

Glace Mixture, bulk, 80 cts. per pound 

Assorted Caramels, 60 cts. per pound 

Salted Peanuts in bulk, Salted Almonds, Pecans, Pistachio 
and Assorted Nuts in 10 cent bags. 



Deuel's Drug Store 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 22, 1922. 



No. 8 



EDUCATION COMMISSION 
SEES COLLEGE THURSDAY 



M. A. C. HARRIERS IN TENTH | STUDENT FORUM HELD AT TUFTS JUMBOS BETTER M.A.C. 

AT N. E. INTERCOLLEGIATES 



Meets with Administration Officers 

to discuss Vital Matters About 

Future of M. A. C. 

The Special Commission for an In- 
vestigation relative to Technical and 
Higher Education, appointed last Iprilf 
by Governor Cox, was on campus last 
Thursday. The members of the Com- 
mission are: Lemuel II. Murlin, Presi- 
dent of Boston University, Chairman: 
Mrs. Ceorge M. Baker; Father William 
Devlin, President of Huston College; 
George F. Zook, an expert of the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Education, who is Direc- 
tor of the Commission; Jeremiah M. 
Driscoll ; Carlton II. Richardson, one of 
the trustees of M.A.C; Felix Voren- 
berg; and Hector L. Iieliale, Superin- 
tendent of Schools in Fall Kiver, who is 
secretary of the Commission. With the 
exception of Lemuel Murlin and Felix 
Voreuberg, all the members of the Coin- 
mission were at M. A. C. 

At 9 A. m. Thursday, the Commission 
met at the President's Ofhce to hear a 
statement as to the present activities of 
the College. A general statement, in- 
cluding teaching, was presented by Presi- 
dent Buttertield ; a statement as tore- 
search, was presented by Director S. B. 
Haskell ; and a statement as to the Ex- 
tension Service was presented by Direc- 
tor J. D. Willard. Director Haskell 
spoke on "The Significance of the Food 
Supply Function of the College." The 
question "What woud be involved in 
the further broadening of the scope of 
ili« College, if thai seems to be a de- 
sirable departure?" was discussed by 
President Buttertield and Dr. U. T, 
Fernald. 

At noon the Commission lunched at 
Draper Hall. Following luncheon came 
Continued on page S 



ASSEMBLY LED BY ADELPHIA 



FRUIT JUDGING TEAM TO 

JOURNEY TO PENN. STATE 



MacCready and Tanner Lead for the 

Team. U. of Maine and Bates 

Fight Hard for First. 

The New England Intercollegiate 
Croat Country meet was held last Satur- 
day morning. November IS, at Franklin 
Park, Boston. The l/niversity of Maine 
surprised the several hundred spectators 
by winning the race from M. I. T. who 
was picked to he the favorite winner 
after her victory from Cornell. The 
Aggie team made a creditable showing 
andwas cheered 00 by a large contingent 
of studcntK and alumni of the college. 
The f» i m'le course was not as hilly as 
ours, but there were several sharp drops, 
which made it haul for the runnels. 
Thirteen \. E. colleges were represented 
by a total of 87 entries. Capt. Hendrie 
of Tech was t he sensational hero of the 
day. He took the lead at the tirst 
whistle and held it steadily throughout 
1 he entire course. He finished a go.. d 
two hundred yards ahead of anyone else, 
bis time being 28 minutes, 47 2-5 
seconds. He showed great endurance 
and still had plenty of reserve when he 
crossed the tape at the finish. Incident- 
ally he clipped two minutes fiom last 
year's time for the same course. C. A. 
McKeeman of the University of Maine 
was a good second. 

The University of Maine came through 
in fine form and placed enough men in 
the first ten to retain the title of N. B. 
Cross Country Champions. Hales also 
placed more men in the first ten than 
did Tech. beating them by a good 55 
potato. Took fell far short of expecta- 
rion8 by taking only third place. 

The M. A. C. team stayed in the rear 
for the first part of the course, but 
gradually almost every man crept up 
on his opponents to the very end. Capt. 
MrCready ran a tine race ami finished 
16th. Tanner came in soon afterward 
in 29th place. Both of them passed 
Continued on page 6 



IN ANNUAL CLASSIC 9-6 



Little Diacussion Takes Place. Honor 

System Satisfactory. Prof. 

Hicks Speaks. 

Assembly hour last week was given 
over to a Student Forum, led by Adel- 
phia. !■ the absence of Will. ei Marsh- 
man, president of Adelphia, Owen E. 
Folsom acted as chairman. The first 
matter for discussion was the Honor 
System. All the studenls seemed satis- 
lied with the Constitution in its pres- 
ent form ami with the way its regula- 
tions were being observed. 

The next matter to come up was Sen- 
ate regulations concerning the Fresh- 
men. A discussion of Arena 1'ariies 
was hiought to a cb.se by the announce- 
ment of the President of I he Senate 
that the Senate had already passed a 
regulation abolishing them. The rules 
stating that Freshmen must weal coals 
over sweaters ami thai they must wear 
Freshman caps on Sundays as well as 
on the other days of the week WON 
also talked over. A petition that the 

Continued on pa»» 8 



Win for First Time in Four Years by 
Margin of One Field Goal. Aggie 

Baeks Team to Limit. 
i.asi Saturday ifteraooa at the Tafti 

Oval the Mass. aggls loolball team 
went down to defeat al tbl bands of llu 

Culls eleven, to the tune of !»-«!. Froll 
ihf tirst whistle the game was a bard 
fought coolest and it was clearly evi- 
denl llial both teams WON oiil lor a 
victory ami al limes ibe play waxed 
somewhat rough, but BO seih.us out- 
come resulted. Both teams lesolted to 
strenuous ladies ami as a result the 
game was last and well played. 

Promptly al i o'clock Captain Cra\ 
son kicked oil l..i the Aggies ami sen. 
the ball to Cohen <ui his HI yard lim- 
it was itin back IS yards bofoft 'to- 
man was finally downed. Alier two 
unsuccessful line plunges a five yard 
penally was Inflicted for Tttfll oil side. 
I. trill kicked to I'.ariows who ran it 
back live yards. Tumey punted iiu 

mediately toCoben who ran ii back 16 



Twenty-Five Teama from all Parts 

of Country to Compete. Team 
not yet Picked. 

The fruit judging team will goto 
I'enn. State College to compete in the 
contest to be held there Dec. tt. The 
1 oining contest will be much more com- 
plicated than the one held in Nashua 
due to the greater variety of fruit which 
will be judged. The competition is 
going to be greater in this contest, 
there being about 25 teams from all 
over the country participating. 

As yet the team has not been picked 
and the whole class is practicing faith- 
fully under the direction of Coach B, D. 
Drain. 

It has not been decided yet whether 
or not M.A.C. will send a packing 
team to compete in this contest. 



Last Chance to Cheer the Team! 

MASS MEETING TONIGHT 

Bowker Auditorium 
at 7-00 P. M. 

Second Act of Last Week's 
display of stage artiats. 

Parade starts in front of the 
Davenport at 6-45 P. M. 

SENDOFF.— The team leaves for 
East Lansing Thursday afternoon. 
Dean Machmer has allowed 16 
minutes from the third period so 
that everyone may be over at the 
Drill Hall at 2-50 P. M. Every- 
body out ! 



NINETEEN MEN TO LEAVE FOR 
MICHIGAN AGGIE TOMORROW 



Men in Good Condition, and Confi- 
dence of both Teams Insures 
Hard Fight. 

Next Thursday afternoon the Mass. 
Aggie football team leaves for the first 
interseotionalganie in the history of the 
college to be played at Lansing. Mich. 
Although the distance isgreat compared 
to thai usually negotiated the athletic 
depart ment has arranged it ho that no 
more time will be taken from classes 
than tor a game in Maine. Nineteen 
men will take the trip and will be ae 
companied by Coaches Core and Cray- 
son, Athletic Director Hicks, Trainer 
Ball and Dr. Daniels. The men are: 
Abele, Alger, Beal, Marsh man, Cray- 
son, Mohor, Mudgett , Nowers, Sargent. 
Tumey, Harrows, Bike. Myrick. I'eirce, 
Salman, Ferranli, (Jleason, Marx and 
tfcGeoeb. The Michigan Aggie Alumni 
Association has sent out invitations to 
all the graduates asking them to be 
btok to see "the (Jreen and White 
triumph in Michigan's initial inters.-. 
tional game.' 1 But the Westerners' con 
tidence is no greater than that of any 
Mass. Aggi<* fan who has seen his team 
in action. Few of the regulars are suf- 
| fering from injuries which will keep 
t hem out of the game. Captain Crayson 
is perhaps the worst off, having a twisted 
neck, but the doctor says that he may 
get into the lineup. 

The authorities have allowed stu- 
dentl the first 15 minutes of the third 
period Thurday afternoon for a sendoff 
and everyone is expected at the Drill 
Hall te see the team off. 





•o to 
5'** 

2 T» 

3 t: 



I). C. (fowBBi 'St, Km. in Ci van 

yards, but Chen was layed out for a 

couple of minutes. Tcriill promptly 

punted lo Barrows who tumbled but 

Continued on page 2 

FIRST CONCERT OF MUSICAL 
CLUBS AT CONWAY FRIDAY 

Next Friday evening the combine. I 
Musical Clubs will give their first con- 
cert oi I he teaSOU when they appear at 
COB way, Mass. The Clubs will leave 
Amherst Friday afternoon and make 
the trip by automobile, arriving in Con- 
way in time tot I church supper which 
will be served at the Congregational 
church, and the concert will be bold in 
the town hall. 

The conceit is to be held under the 
auspices of the Current Topics Club. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, 1922. 



TUFTS GAME 

Continued from Dace 1 



recovered on the 20-yard line. Tumey 
punted to Etelman who ran back six 
yards with the ball. At this point 
Uoacb was sent in for Cohen, who was 
showing the effects of the hard tack- 
ling of the Aggie men. 

On the next play Terrill was smeared 
behind bis own line of scrimmage for 
an 8 yard loss, after two unsuccessful 
line plunges. On the fourth down Ter- 
rill punted a loug one, which Barrows 
let roll and a touebback was the re- 
sult. It was Aggie's ball on the 20- 
yard line. Tumey punted to Etelman 
who was stopped on bis own 55-yard 
line. He was knocked out in this play 
but was soon up and continued the 
game. After two plunges at the line 
which netted only five yards, Terrill 
punted the ball over the Aggie goal 
line for the second time and the ball 
came out to the 20-yard line. Tumey 
punted to lioach who ran off-side at the 
50-yard line. Roach took the ball 
through tackle on the fourth down for 
four yards more, but failed to make 
first down. Again Tirrell punted the 
ball over the Aggie goal line for 
another louchback and the ball was 
the visitors' on the 20-yard marker. 
Tumey punted a long one but an off- 
Bide brought the ball back with a five 
yard penalty besides. He punted ajjain 
to Etelman on the 50-yard stripe, and 
he was downed in his tracks. 

With the ball in their possession 
Tufts chose to plug the line but to no 
avail, so after three unsuccessful at- 
tempts Tirrell punted to Tumey on the 
:«)-yard line. Immediately Tumey 
punted back on the next play and Mar- 
tin received the pig-skin but did not 
run it back. Three more plunges at 
the Aggie line failed to net the required 
10 yards so Tirrell booted a long one 
which looked as though it would go 
over the goal line, but it stopped on 
the three yard line where Barrows was 
forced to down it. Tumey punted out 
from behind his goal line to Martin on 
the 33-yard strip. On the next play 
Etelman missed a bad pass from center, 
but Tirrell recovered for a loss. At 
this point the period ended. 

During this intermission the Aggies 
got up some of their old fight that has 
been known to come forth in past 
games, and the way they went into the 
Tufts' line and smeared the plays was 
a caution. On the first play at the start 
of the quarter Roach was tackled be- 
hind his own line of scrimmage for a 
loss of five yards. On the next play 
Tufts opened up with something new, a 
triple pass behind their own line of 
scrimmage. The visitors here showed 
that they were on the alert when the 
final man to receive the ball was nailed 
for an eight yard loss. Tirrell lifted a 
long boot which Barrows fumbled, and 
Russo recovered on the 20-yard line. A 
line plunge by Tufts failed to gain 
anything. On the next play Etelman 
fumbled but recovered for a five yard 
loss. Etelman completed an almost 
lateral pass to Tirrell which netted but 
one yard, but it brought the team into 
position for a drop-kick, which Etel- 
man made, the ball sailing cleanly 
through the goal posts, for a pretty 
field goal, the first score of the game. 

Martin received Grayson's kick-off on 
the 20-yard line and ran the ball back 
10 yards before be was downed. After 
three line plunges which left barely 
six inches to go for a first down, Tirrell 
punted to Barrows who ran it back 10 
yards to the 30-yard marker. Grayson 
carried the ball for a total of seven 



yards in two tries and IfeGaoeb added 
one more, so Tumey kicked. Etelman 
received the ball and ran it baek 15 
yards to the 35-yard line. 

By means of good work in the line 
and his interference Martin broke 
through the left side of the line on the 
next play for a gain of 30 yards, finally 
being stopped by Barrows after he had 
been boxed. After unsuccessful tries 
at the line, the home team tried a for- 
ward pass which failed. It was the 
Aggies' ball bat an all-loo-costly fum- 
ble was recovered by Roach who ran It 
to the 4-yard zone. In two tries Martin 
made three yard*, and Etelman look 
the ball over for the first touchdown. 

The game began to look rather du- 
bious for the visitors but the never-say- 
die spirit was predominant, and there 
was not an Aggie rooter that had lost 
faith in the team for M instant, as was 
shown by the hearty cheer, which 
followed the victorious pandemonium 
from the Tufts stands. 

Martin received (;rayson's kick-off on 
his own 20-yard line and ran it up to 
the 30-yard belt. Roach made a yard 
at tackle, but the Medfordites were pen- 
alized 10 yards for roagbaaat. Martin 
gained but four yards so Tirrell punted. 
Barrows caught it on the 55-yard line. 
Two off-tackle plays by (irayson and 
a gain by "Id" Tumey gave the Aggie 
team first down. It was the "Agates" 
turn to open up with something, and a 
long pass from "Willie" Marshman to 
"Dame" (irayson would have netted 15 
yards bad not a five yard penalty been 
inflicted far off-side by M.A. 0. N'olli- 
ing daunted, Marshman tried it again, 
with more stucess. for by leaping high 
into the air (irayson pulled the ball 
down for a 14-yard gain. Mcticoch took 
the ball over for a first down. Two 
more attempts by (irayson netted first 
down again. Marshman attempted 
another pass to Grayson which was in- 
complete, barrows was thrown for a 
loss, but a 15-yard penalty inflicted up- 
on Tufts put the ball on the 4-yard 
strip. A line plunge netted two more, 
iu which Etelman was injured in the 
leg and was forced to leave the field. 
His place was taken by Kaalaari. Mc- 
Geoch carried tne ball over the line for 
the first and only Aggie touchdown. 
Beal was sent in to kick the goal but 
the attempt was blocked. This ended 
the scoring for the game. 

For the first time during the game 
Tufts chose to kick off. Tyler kicked to 
Nktieoch who ran it back 20 yards to 
the 30-yard line. Two line plunges by 
the AggieB resulted in a gain of two 
yards, when the half ended. 

In the second half both teams were 
much refreshed and more aggressive, 
but the ball was kept well in midtield 
and no scoring resulted. Grayson 
kicked to Martin who received on his 
15-yard stripe and ran back 30 raxda. 
After two attempts at the line Tirrell 
punted to Barrows. Aggie also at- 
tempted to gain twice through the line, 
but to no avail, so Tumey punted. 
Martin received the ball and ran it 
back 10 yards, but Aggie was penalized 
15 yards for roughness. Terrill was 
tackled for a 2-yard loss on the first 
play, but Martin made it up on the 
next. Tufts tried for a forward pass 
which Tumey intercepted. Grayson 
made three yards in two tries and 
Tumey punted to Cohen on the 35-yard 
strip. Tufts opened up with a cross 
buck, with Hughes carrying the ball, 
but the opponents were ready for it and 
it was stopped three yards behind the 
line of scrimmage. Another plunge 
netted three yards, and Terrill punted 
to Barrows on the 20-yard line, A pen- 



Choice of a Career 

From the Yale News 



THE NINETY-FOUR 

Someone, probably an insurance 
agent, was quoted recently as saying 
that from the mass of one hundred 
college graduates one individual only 
rose to the Polo and butler class, peril- 
ously near the top of the financial lad- 
der. Five others became comfortably 
off and found themselves after twenty 
years at the small yacht and chauffeur 
stage. The other ninety-four presum- 
ably congregate in the great section of 
the American people who drive their 
own Buicks to the golf club. In other 
words, dreaming about being a rich 
man is one thing, and making the grade 
is "something else again." 

Yet the ninety-four presumably work 
just as hard as the sumptuous six. Their 
business is the axis on which a small 
and uninteresting world revolves. They 
have become devotees of the dollar 
and when that fickle deity deserts, have 
nowhere else to turn. Jammed in a 
dull, straight rut of business they can 
never leave the road and jump the fence 
into finer fields of life. This, then, is 
the portion of ninety-four men out of 
every hundred now on the campus. 

The answer to the problem lies in 
the proper choice of a career. 



Between now and Commencement 
we shall have something to offer on 
the subject of "Careers." Watch for 
the space with the Famous Signature. 




Company 

op Boston. Massachusetts 



Toilet Accessories 



Prophylactic Tooth Brushes 

Colgate's, Pepsodent, Pebecco, Kolynos, and other tooth pastes 

Mermen's, Colgate's and Williams' Shaving Creams and Shaving Sticks 

Gillette, Gem, Everready and Durham Duplex Razor Blades 

Talcum Powders, Bay Rum, Almond Cream and Cold Cream for use after 

shaving 

For mouth washes and antiseptic use, Listerine, Lavoris, Glycothymoline 

and Peroxide 

Hudnut's, Pinaud's, Roger and Gallet, Djerkiss, Yardley, Azurea and other 

toilet waters 

Fine Toilet Soaps 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, 1922. 



IN 



Convenient 



The cold mornings are coming when a cup of 
coffee between classes will be the cup that cheers. 

YE AGGIE INN 



Good Service 



ally was incurred on Tutu at this time 
liut Captain (irayson refused tue pen- 
alty and the ball was put into play, 
(irayson was thrown for a loss of five 
yards, but a wide end run with Tumey 
carrying the ball netted that live and 
ten more for a first down. Grayson was 
tackled ou the line of sot immune and 
Tumey made three yards. Martin was 
tackled on his 35-yard line, after he 
had caught Tumey's punt. After two 
failures to pierce tbe Aggie line Terrill 
kicked to Barrows on the 10-yard line 
and be ran it back 15 yards. Tumey 
went through tbe line for five yards and 
(irayson for three more, and another 
plunge netted first down. AfterUray- 
son had been thrown for a loss Barrows 
broke away and gave a pretty exhibi- 
tion of broken field running for 25 yards 
before he was brought down. This put 
the ball on Tufts' 28-yard strip, (iray- 
son made two attempts to pierce tbe 
Tufts line but bis first try resulted in 
no gain and the second time he was 
thrown for an 8-yard loss. Here the 
■ I uarter ended. 

Tbe visitors opened the fourth quart- 
er with as pretty an exhibition of for- 
ward passes as was seen throughout the 
game. Marshman dropped back ami 
heaved tbe ball 25 yards to Grayson's 
waiting arms. It was well executed 
and made the home team sit up and 
take a little notice. McGeocb plugged 
the line but to no avail, so another for- 
ward, Marshman to Grayson, was again 
completed, but it was ruled incomplete 
as Marshman was thought to be too 



near the line of scrimmage, lie then 
went back to try tbe same thing but 
faked it and made two yards throuuli 
the left side of the line. Another at- 
tempt at a pass failed and it was Tufts' 
ball. Four line chaises by Tufts netted 
first down and Terrill made four yards 
through tackle, while Hoach broke 
throat b for first down on the next play. 
Koach was stopped at the seriminauc 
line, and a 5-yard penalty was ineuind 
for Tufts offside. Martin made two 
yards, leaving 18 to iz«. lioach made 
two more and Terrill kicked. Harrows 
received the ball but fumbled, and Me- 
(ieoeh reeovered on the 20-yard line. 
Tumey gained four yards through (In- 
line and a forward pass was tried but 
not completed. Martin was slopped on 
the t.Vynid line after making a pretty 
catch of Tumey's punt. Koach went 
through the line twice for a total of 
seven yards and Martin made first 
down. On the next play Martin was 
stopped with no gain but Aggie was 
penalized five yards for offside, so it 
was Tufts' first down. After three 
tries, with no results, to plug the Aggie 
stonewall, Terrill kicked an on lid* 
punt, which (irayson recovered on the 
15-yard band. Tumey went around left 
end for four yards but MHicoch a*M 
slopped without gala. Tunny made 
five and punted on (he next play. By 
reversing his field Marl in carried 
Tumey's punt back 15 yards before he 
was downed. Aggie was penalized for 
offside and it was Tufts' liist down. 
Hoach had made live yards and Martin 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 

Henry Jewell'f Repertory Compmny 



Thum. and Fri. Eves.. Sat. Afternoon and 

Kve.. Nov. -a. 24, m\ Jn Itic hard Brlnslcy 

Sheridan's Delightful Comedy. 

" THE RIVALS " 



Mon.. Tues. ami Weil. KTM., Viv. H.M,t», 

In "RAFFLES" 

Tin' tani'ins I M'tiTt jvc I'la.v . 
by K. W. Iloiiiiliii: anil Kiieene Prendre) . 



Overcoats ! ! 

That are distinctive in style and quality— made by the house 
of Kuppenheimer— and worn by men who wish to look ri^ht. 

We also have some new good-looking 
Golf Hose and Woolen Half Hose. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block .... Amherst, MatM. 

The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes. 



one more when tbe game ended, with 
the final score »-«( in favor of Tufts. 

Both Tumey and Terrill were punting 
in good form and not one was blocked 
or fell short on either side. Tufts' on- 
side short kick did not (rive tbe Maroon 
and White any trouble and both teams 
were on tbe lookout for their oppon- 
ent's trick plays. 

It would be hard to pick outstanding 
players on either team and still do 
justice to the others. It may be said 
that eleven men played the tiauie for 
each side and played it hard. One 
could not mention the merits of the 
teams however without an extra word 
OOaaaraiag Captain (irayson for tbe 
Annies and Martin for Tufts. Tbe work 
of both these men was a feature of tbe 
name and both seemed immune to tbe 
hard (aeklinn of their opponents. 

The summary : 

Tri is Mass. \<.<.ii - 

took, le re, Hike 

Mortal! , le re, Baigaat 

Kite, It rt, Mohm 

Barrett, It 

Wilson, Ik ri;, Sowers 

K. Thompson, In 

Kusso, c c, Al^er 

Share, rn l«, Muduett 

Hennessey, rg 

Tyler, rt It, Salman 

llunhes. re le, Marshman 

A I Thompson, re 

Ktelman, ol> qb, Harrows 

Eaatart, qb qb, Heal 

Martin <|h 

Martin I lib rhb, Tumey 

Itoac'h, Ihb 

Terrill, rhb Ihb, (irayson 

Coin n, lb fb, Mc(»eocb 

Roach, fb 

Score 1>\ periods: 

1 2 3 4 

Tufls. » <l 1' 

Mass. Annies, (» 0- « 

Touchdowns — Ktelman, McCcocli. 
Coal form field Ktelman. Referee — 
II. A.Swatlield. Rrown. Umpire — A. (J. 
Johnson, ISprinntiebl. Linesman — A. 
W. Innalls, Hrown. Time -four IS min. 
periods. 

EDUCATION COMMISSION 

Continued from page 1 

an inspection of tbe campus. Then at 
8-15 al the ['resident's Oflice there was a 
qui// by members of the Commission 
coiiceininn the work of the College, as 
outlined at the moruinn session. Fol- 
lOwlag supper at Draper Hall, the Corn- 
mission met with the staff of adminis- 
tration, the Heads of Departments and 
other I'rofessors in Memorial Hall. 
Here they discussed the question "What 
does experience in State educational 
institutions for technical and higher 
education suggest to Massachusetts?" 




In a class by themselves ! 

Young men's suits of our own 
making. 

Prices moderate. 

Rogers Pkkt Company 

Hroadway Herald Square 

at 13th St. "Four at 36th St 

Convenient 
Hroadway Corners" Fifth At: 

at Warren at 41st St. 

NKW YORK CITY 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel. 4ir> W) Hadlejr. Mas* 



" Watch our windows " 

For Key Trying Days 
HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rex mil Storm 

The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 

P. IX HOMANS, 

Prop. 
Tel. 489-W 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



College Candy Kitchen 



1 









Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, W12. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Student* of the MaHHaehusetts Ag- 
ucultural (College. 

BOA HI) OF EDITORS. 



no. KveTnr^wouTd-h& fanatics watrh 

iIm-ii- stories l)r<)adcaHte<l and tlieir 

peculiarities strewd, and aBterprislng 

reporters persist in DOliag out notorious 
siories MA. C does not desire to he 
connected with t tie case an<l surely 
agriculture has its share of troubles 
without baviDfi any further unnecessary 
additions made. 



1NTERCLASSJHEEI EXPECTED l !l Town Hall, 
TO SHOW UP GOOD MATERIAL 



;. 11i1 kh. { .Aku,nu,os-« Margin* Editor 

Dbpartmbmt II I tW! 

|i.\ in'. W. Si vol "SB 

Ai.ni'ul K. N% vi <oi '24 

l,i . w m II. Kin II "* 

|,i i ii Kit It. Aniov.i"N 'j:i 

JOHS <i. lit »» "-'* 

OH \i;l i- I ■ «»l IMH. in. •-'•"' 

Roto M, w.M.i. "n 

i,. raaNeis kksm 'i-v "24 

John M. Whittikk'28 



gdttortal. 

Athletics. 
A<;nlcii.i I, 

CStupos, 



Ka.iiliN. 
Alumni. 
Two - Ve:n . 
Kxeliaime "id 
<oininnni.;.ti..ns.SM l, ( oiikn » 



lUtBINEHH DEPARTMENT. 

Owen K. roUM *■ H.ratnras Manager 

Km,K.„.K.S,KKUK. '.M Advertising" Manager 
!,,,,.,„,. I.. B«.D« W Clrculstlon Manager 

|>oNAI.I> W. LBWISf* 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
oopieg, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
.orihers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Kntered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
P„.t Offloe. AcceMe.l f»r ...ailing at special 
rate of postast i.rovlde.1 for in section 110S Act 
of October. 1017 authorised Amjust 20. 1018. 



Alumni at Tufts. 
The Tufts oral last Saturday was the 
objective of one of the largest gather* 
iuiis of M. A. 0. Alumni ever seen. 
The Auu'ie spirit abides with a large 
majority of the Boston alumni without 

any .loubt. Fully 1000 Ag^ie backers 
packed the stands, outnumbering the 
Tufts men on their own held. 

Between the halves a reuular old- 
time reunion look place, rivaling the 
Semi-centennial in its enthusiasm and 
scope of welcomes from a standpoint of 
numbers. More than W% of the stu- 
dents of M. A. C. are drawn from Bos- 
ton and vicinity, a fact which accounts 
rot the size of the gathering. The 
alumni ol Boston are behind the foot- 
ball team and they have not lost inter- 
est in athletics. Only the narrow iuar- 
gla of defeat served to prevent the day 
from boing ■ huge success. 



Fourteen Track Events to be Run if 

Possible. No Entries Accepted 

After 1 P. M. Friday. 

General interest is ba*U| shown in 
the interclass handicap track meet 
which is scheduled to be run off next 
Saturday afternoon, Nov. '25. It is ex- 
pected that some good Freshman ma- 
terial will enliven the competition, so 
that some idea of the propecls tor the 
sprint? may be determined. 

N,. entries will be accepted after 1 r. M. 

on Friday. The time schedule of the 
.•vents will be posted in the athletic 
ollice soon after that time. No individ- 
ual is allowed in more than three events. 
Any event, to be run off, must have at 
least four participants. All regular 
fourteen events will be held, including; 
the javelin throw, if there are euou»h 
participants in each to warrant its bolng 

held. 

All M men will start on scratch, but 
others will be giVOB handicaps e.u- 
respondtni to their ability. Class 
numerals will be awarded to winners of 
lirst and second places. Storing will be 
live, three, one, according to place, and 
will be kept by classes. 



Wedn'day 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Extra Day. Thursday Prices 

Winchell Smith's great 
American i>iay."T»rn to the 
Right," s reels, with Alice 
Terry, JacK Mulhall ant 
Harry Myers. 
Pathe Review Comedy 



■n,,,.,,!,,, George Arllss. Mrs. George 

1 nursday Xriii". uuue Hut? ami m- 

inald Denny in "Disraeli, 

H r'ls. a screen triumph from 

bis celebrated stage success. 

News Comedy 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 

Mat 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

S; turday 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 

Monday 

Mat. 3. Kve 
6-45 8-30 



Constance Talmadde and 
Kenneth Harlan in "Polly 
of the Follies." A positive 
riot of laughter. 

Sport Review 
•2-reel Mack Sennett Comedy 

Richard Barthelmes and 
Lonise Huff in "The Seventh 
Day." 1» l'ortci B. Hi nunc. 

News 
Larry Semon in "Dew Drop 
Ian" 

John Barrymore. Colleen 
Moore. Anna Nilsson and 
Wesley Barry in "The Lotus 
Eater." 

Round No. 3 "The Leather 
Pushers." Pathe Review 



Publicity vs. Notoriety. 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mill* Studio, b Bone S88-R, P.O. Block 



,, w„ubl seen, thai M. B.C.bM mole 
than its -hare of space in newspapers.!. 
,,„. sl .„salional notorious columns. 
Free love. bOlM stealing- alleged un- 
lawful employment ol enemy aliens. 

.,,„! i :ls tly front page news of a con- 

.cleotlous objector In out n.idst. This 
year has brought mow diagraeefBl 

scandal from its repository in Amherst 
(where, bv the way. it should always 
bave remained Iban In any one pre- 
vious year, and worse still, the college 
year has just bOgUB. 

The question of oonaciontiowi objee- 
,•„,„ bM (for two whoie years) peace- 
fully rested UU though I of and presum- 
able dropped. Sud.lei.lv it pops out in 
the most unexpected and absurd place 
Imaginable Our B. O. *. C. dubbed a 
Motcb on the ts»S of Christianity Its 

clean lnvlgoratibge»«Polao,lti training 
la the essential requteltee of discipline, 
Itamoai enjoyable practice In the art ol 

horsemanship decided useless, BB-God- 

llk „ , uu \ ,he benctits negligible. 
What II the above motives ate eeeoB- 
( | ( ,v Hon. the uovernmenl view, thev 
are primary and perhaps the only ones 
t„ be considered Iron, the student's 

angle. 

according to the original Land (.rant 
College lei avers student receiving ■ 
diploma was to participate in military 
training, with the exception ol those 
physically deneieal an.l apparently 
those religiously .list .. .lined and con- 
scientiously objecting. If ihla latter Is 
true, we as Americans bewail the fact, 
but humbly resign ourselves to thecon- 

eloalon. Kevertbeleae as long as the 

Memorial Ball stands silently and re- 
flectively on the campus with its ap- 
propriate inscription "W« will keep 
faith with you who lie asleep" we will 

god it hard to reconcile our inward 
contemplations to Um accepted free 

speed, and tree beliefs for which 

America stands. 

PBblkltyf Yes. M. A.C. wants it. 

aeeda it. Wbal better nay to aoqoainl 
the eltiaeDs ol Maeeaehosetta with the 

benefits of their si ate college? Publi- 
city through notoriety F No, absolutely 



COMMUNICATION 
To niK Editor or thk coi.i.koian: 

There is a feature of the advertising 
of the college that has come to the fore 
in the last few months that needs some 
discussion and perhaps action in the 
direction of a change. 

We as a college are receiving a great 
deal of front page space in the news- 
papers, telling I he world at large of our 
free love advocates, burse thieves. 
enemy aliens and conscientious objec- 
tors. In short we are allowing people 
to judge us by our freaks. II, as the 
writer believes, this is an undesirable 
phase of our advetiisiog, we have a 
problem on our hands, for undoubtedly 
freaks and the unusual make good news 

copy. 

There is one thing, however, that 
might be done in this connection. That 
is for the gentlemen who send our news 
to the papers to pay at least as .much 
aiiention to the activities of "the other 
ninety-nine per cent" of the students 
as to the few Mendelian sports among 
us. This might mean less front-page 
space, but it would be space used to 
much greater advantage as far as the 
college is concerned. 

More publicity certainly, but less no- 
toriety might be desirable. 

K. v. B. m. '2S. 



SIDE LIGHTS 



The Aggie rooters outnumbered and 
outcheered the Tufts stands. 



The Aggie cheers made a line impres- 
sion on the Tufts followers. Theirs 
were also good but lacked the fighting 
spirit that backs a team. 



Enroute to Boston the squad was en- 
tertained by Fred liollis who gave an 
illustrated lecture on "lJow to Live on 
Thirty-Six Lents a Day." He pre- 
sented his subject in a pleasing man- 
ner. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn RmumMng While U Wmlt 

NKW l'KH'EB 
Men's Whole Soles. Kiibber Heels . . W-50 
Mens Half Boles, Robber Heels . . ■ W.75 

Men's IMbber Soles. Kubber Heels . . **.;» 

Mens Half Soles •*■■ 

Work (iuaranteeu— AMHKKST HOUSE 



Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM. SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 
Cigars ami Cigarettes H p e e ta. nrtee per sartea 

on I marettes. 

SchralTt's < ho.olatt-s and otlier leading lines. 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 



Last year we won after three defeats. 
This year they won under the same 
circumstances. 



Tufts' Freshmen do not ring the bell 
so long as ourB do. 



The Pullman on the li.AM. special 
train was indeed a novelty. 



The Boston trip was a good one hut 
it was some come down from New York. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio-MASONK HMK K-Northampton. 

club Nitfiit Pa aees a o a e j larwttl M. a. ('.Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 

"kingslevs 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Eevrything All "Write" Here 



Tufts carried what was left of their 
band off in a wagon. Ours used 
Shank's mare. 



SIXTY-ONE GUESTS ENJOY 
DIVISION ROUND-UP FRIDAY 

The heads of departments in ll.el.i-, 
vision of Agriculture entertained all »er aooui 

the members of t licit departments and J studeuts. 
their wives at a "Division Uoundup*' 



One hundred and sixty-three went 
down on the special train-including 
the team and the band. Of this nun. 



in Btoekbridge Hall last Friday eve 
nlng. 



The Bostonians in North Station 
when the M. A. C. special came in were 



Professor Graham was chairman of a little In doubt as to whether the band 

. ... . i. i... .._ . l.„ >s.. I,-.,. 




the committee in charge of the supper 
and he acted as chef. The menu was 
made up as far as possible from prod- 
ucts of the college farm and Included 
chicken pie. salad, rolls, apple butter, 
ice cream, cake, and coffee. 

Following the supper a staff meeting 
was held in Room 102 to discuss Fresh- 
man Agriculture. At 8-30 dancing and 
.aids were in order during the remain- 
der of the evening. Wendell '23 and 



was a part ot West l'oint or the Salva- 
tion Army. 



Any one who tried to pick the visit- 
ing team's bleachers by the small num- 
ber of students there would have been 
mistaken in sides at the Tufts game. 



During the latter part of the return 
trip of the Special, various divisions ot 



der of the evening VYenue,. « *u« j r ^ ^ of 

Seats 23 furnished the music. Sixty^ lUD 



one guests were present. 



the cars. 



no matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Lettei 
Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters, Pens, 
Ink, Pencils, Kulers, Mucilage, etc 
Every article is warranted, and out 
prices are as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, 1°22. 




••THE PRESENT IS THE PAST OF YOUK FUTURE*' 



^iUY a Barberry while you «rc» a FrcKhinaii and you will have fhe hv*i imported 
^> rout made— the initial expense in a little more, hut four years henee you will 
realize that "TOM" saved you real money and that yon hud a eoat of whieh you 
were proud all through your eollege course. 

"THE HOUSE OF WALSH" 




MAJ. SHNYDER LEAVES M. A. C. | NATIONALLY KNOWN CHEMIST, 
LOSS TO R. 0. T. C. KEENLY FELT DR. WHEELER 83, TO SPEAK 



Much Loved and Respected in Col- 
lege. Built up Cavalry Unit 
to a High Standard of 
Excellence. 

Major Frederick C.Shnyder; ProfeseoC 
of Military Service and Tactics l.-lt on 
leave of absence November 1'iib 
Major Shny. b-r reiir.s from active sei 
vice Dec. |1, 1!I2'_' alter twenty tin. 'c 
years service in the army. He WBI 
born in Pennsylvania Oct. 15, 1878 and 
received in lH'.W the degree of A. 1L 
liciin Lafayette College. 

He entered the military academy at 

West Point in 1888 and was graduated 

and appointed 2nd Lt. of (avalrv in 
l'.HIH. 

He served in the Ordnance Depart- 
ment from June 1811 lO Sepl. PUT. 

Major Mi n yd er served orerseas through 

the World War as a Lt . Col, of Field 
Artillery and at the close of the war 
reverted to his permanent rank of 
Major of Cavalry 

He was appointed Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics at 
M. A. 0. July 22. 1881 and under his 
direction the unit at this college: has 
made a marked increase in elliciencv . 

Major Shnyder leaves wit h t he affee- 
lion and respect of the faculty and 
-indent body behind hint andwilli I lull 
best wishes for his l uii. te happiness 

CHARLES W. KEMP ELECTED 
TO NEW POSITION AT COLLEGE 



Well Known In Agricultural ChemiB- 
try.Oeology and 8oil Technology. 

Dr. Homer Jay Wheeler. M. A. C. '*3 
and Ph.D. Lniversilv ot (JOttlogen V. 
is to speak at Ibis week's assembly, 
Thursday IfoV, to. Dr. Wheeler ba- 
ilee, i a chemist at lbs If. A. < Kxpert- 
meat Station and Director of lbs H L 
State College Experiment Station. He 
is new manager ol lbs agricultural 

service bureau of the American Agri- 
cultural Chemical C... lie is a member 
of the American Chemical Society, 

American Geological Society and Soci- 
al) "t Agronomy, besides being an ex- 
preside ui ol ;io- Vss.i'n of Official Agri- 
cultural Chemists, lie is alsu a mem- 
ber of t ha Boston City Club and the 
FIoi'si'h and Gardener's club, and 
is I be author ot a boob <>u ferti- 
liser*. His Inline is ill NeWtOI] < inlet', 
Ma-s. 



As Field Professor in Teacher Train- 
ing, He Comes Here With Wide 
Experience in this Line. 

I harles W. Kemp has recently been 
sleeted its Field Professor in Teacher 

Training at tbe Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. Mr. Kemp was prepared 
for college in Sanborn Seminary. New 
Hampshire, and received the 1$. Be. 
degree from the New Hampshire Siaie 
< ollege in 11*1(1. He has had a wide 
experience in practical agriculture. 
Working under tbe direction of tbe U. 
>. Department of Agriculture he assisted 
in a survey of dairy farms in New 
Hampshire. Mr. Kemp's teaching 
iieer began in PUl at Pruct.ii Acail.ni> 
where he taught agriculture, lie went 
from there to Colebrook Academy, N 



DEAN CLARK OF UNIV. OF ILL. 
TO SPEAK HERE NEXT SUNDAY 

One of the Foremost Deans of Men 
in America and Noted Author. 
Dean Thomas Arkle Clark of the 
University ol Illinois b lbs speaker la 

ne\l Sunday's chapel, Nu\. -Jti. He has 
been Dean ot the colleen since 1908, and 

is considered one of tbe foremost deans 

of men in America. He has been 

professor of English and rhetoric for a 

number of Veals and has wrilleu MVI ral 
books on both subjects, besides some on 

college life subjects oi general interest. 

He is also a contributor to many maga- 
zines and newspapers, lie holds a U. 
L degree from the Unlverattj of till* 
Dole, 1890, and has studied at lbs I'ni- 
v ei si i v of Chicago and Harvard College. 

His home is in I'l bana, III. 



Professor F. C. Bears went to Lewis- 
ton, Maine, last week to addr.--. | 

meeting of tbe Maine State Pomologl- 

cal .Society. 

CROSS COUNTRY 

Continued from page 1 

several men on the last home liretcb, 
and as. usual they both slaved laiily 

.•lose logetber throughout tbe race. 



II., where he served both as principal lli " i "" 1 IJu,,,s l "" h »kowed good light- 
and teacher of agriculture. Beginning '"- spirit and flniabed well. Isaac did 
in 1818 he taught agriculture la the his usual trtek by pawing two men la 



Weymouth branch of the Norfolk Coun- 
ty Agricultural School for two years. 
In H*18 he was called to the B 
School, Lakeville, Conn., to become 
larm manager and agricultural in- 
structor. He was recalled to Weytnotit h 
in 1!»19 to resume his former position as 

lier of agriculture, were he has re- counted. 

Bed up to the present time. He Tb< I« <•• lll » ; U; "" s a " 

comes to the college with an accurate scoree is an followe ; 
knowledge of the problem of teaching ' ■ of Maine 
s .i culture in secondary schools and is Bowdoin 



the last two hundred yards w lien t hey 
had a twenty-live yard lead on him. 

The men who placed w.ie Capt.D. L. 
MeCready 10th; Ed win Tanner 2t»i h ; <'. 

V. Hill Mtb; B. L. Hates Mtb; Carl 
IsaacTlsi. Kichar.l Newell and Sumner 
Burboc also ran. but only the first tive 



1 their 



.its .",:{; Tech 110; 
lulls 174; Hrown 1X1; 

oec sympathy with" the purpose „. ». H. State M*f Wealeyaa 202; Williams 

.e college in the p reparation of teach- *88j M. A. C. 888; Vermont SAO; Boston 

tad their guidance in entering upon University 818 j Holy Crow did not seore, 

their important duties. M liv " , " t " (ii « l not , "" sl ' 



l! 



! 



Cbompson's C-mclp Oiks 



Silver l.versharp will. name. It. \. The akattna seaaoa will assssbs ban*. Are y.n. 

,,,, . n.i.l> V\ , are. <»ui line of lluckey BhOM, 

Whitney, engraved on it. Finder please skates an. 1 Hocker dabs eaat be best. Don't 

buy until >eu bave teen oars Brat, 
return to Kappa Bigma House or Dean's 

Office, and receive reward. 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



Have You Ever Worn 

STETSONS? 

Men who have seldom go back to any other make. 

WHY ? Because thev lit your fed properly 

and give yon a ihoe that delivers comfort, 

long life and looks as well always. 

We'd enjoy showing you the new styles for 

College Men. 



BOLLES 



Amherst 



QUALITY VALUE 

The new Fall models of Hart Schaflner 

& Marx are unquestionably the 

greatest overcoat values 

obtainable. 

Decidedly smart. Expertly tailored. An almost unlimited 
choice ol distinctive patterns in a wide variety of popular 
fabrics. All weights and o/es. Pick yours out now. 

Overcoats priced as low as $17.50 — high as $50 



M. THOMPSON & SON 

Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes. 



THE 



Christmas Bookstall Numbers 



OF THK 



containing a list and summary of the Hooks of 

1922 

will be published as follows: 

Nov. 22 Fiction 

Nov. 29 History and Biography 

Dec. 6— Poetry, Miscellaneous 

Tin- jnveniU nw m be r W9* issuril A'o7>. /j 

Consult these issues before buying your Christmas books. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, W2. 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, 1922. 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 'linns- 
day, Saturday. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 

your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

IT'SA HAPPY FEELING,ISN'T1T, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 

Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 



FACULTY NOTES 
PfofMtof V. B. <'ooley '88, recently 
appointed Director of Extension Service 
,,! the Montana agrteull »ral College, 
was on the campus last week. Stu- 
dents of lo or 20 years ngn will remem- 
ber ProioMor Cooky m band <>»' ina 

Animal II ushamlry work at tins col- 
lege. He was well-known M a driver 
of fast horses and a lover of line stock. 
President l$utterlield , Director Wil- 
led of I he Extension Service, and 
Director Haskell of the El perimeiit 
BUtion are in Washington this week 
attending tlie meetin-i of llie American 

Society ol Agronomy, No?. SO and 81. 

Director Haskell will speak at the 
BOOT* meet iny and also hefore the sec- 
tion on research of the Association of 
Land (.rant Colleges, which meets in 
Washington Nov. II -88. 

Dr. .1. K. Shaw addressed a neetlng 
; ,i Portland, Maine, last week of the 
verv famoOB Portland Fanners (luh. 



MR. G. M. DARROW TALKS 
TO HORT. DEPT. ON MONDAY 



Aggie Stationery 



V. GRAND0N1C0, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

(or first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Soft, m.de to order - $35.00 lo $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suit* framed M><- Military TiUorfM 



OVKlt ADAMS' MUG STOKK 



The Period of Thrift 

The periods of discovery and pioneer- 
ing in the dairy industry are largely 
past and the rewards of prosperity are 
fur those who today faithfully practice 
industry and thrift. 

Anionic these methods of thrift and 
economy none are of more vital import- 
ance than the safe, sweet, wholesome 
sanitary cleanliness which the use of 



C/eaner and c/ejjjser 



bo consistently provides to an increasing 
number of successful dairies, creameries 
and cheese factories. 

This distinctive Wyandotte cleanli- 
ness is the basis of thrift and economy 
in dairy production for it is so unusually 
efficient in its natural cleaning action, 
is so thoroughly yet •Imply applicable, 
is so uniform in its distinctive quality, 
is so protective of blgb quality milk 
products, is so harmless to the hands 
and to metal equipment, and costs so 
little that every particle to the last grain 
in the barrel bespeaks thrift for the 
dairy industry. 

Indian in 
circle 



( inlet tiom 
your supply house. 



Metawampee Annual Trek to be 
Held Saturday, Dec. 9. 

The annual ink ol the Metawampee 
Club will take plana «>n Saturday. Dec. 
«». The trek will be over Mt. Toby and 
dinner will probably be served at I he 
Levered town hall. Last year the hall 

was tilled lo capacity with 73 members 

and this year provision will be made 
for the first 7:1 members who make res- 
ervations with the taculty. President 
Sidney B. Haskell and Trek Masi.-r 
Curry Hicks will be to charm- of ike 
trek. 

The Soot and lireplace la Ike shack at 

Toby were Beiaked a few days ago. 

The shack is now completed and will 
be very convenient fol bacon bats and 
hot-dog roasts. 

Mount Toby. 
Tke iron material lot IBS Mount Toby 
observation lower to expected to arrive 
almost any day now. This winter it 
will be sledded up the mountain and be 
ready for the erection early next ■pftng. 

Tke wreckage from the lee atoraa last 

winter has been cleared out of Ike 

woods on Toby, so lhalllie forest now 
has considerably more beauty than it 
has had for some lime. About KM) 
curds of wood wen- taken out and sold 
to members of I In- faculty* and local 
woo.l dealers A new BTOWlk of .-licst- 

nut is eonting ap to tke stumpaoi 

the trees killed by bliulit. According 
lo Prof. Osmun this glOWth will be 

blighted as aooa as h geti a little older. 

He claims that the blight la just as bad 
as ever and that as yet no immune 
species of chestnut has been found. 



"Native Fruits, and Their Value to 

Replace the Currant," waa His 

Subject. 

Mr. George ftf. Darrow.of tke Burean 

of Plant Industry, Washington, was se- 
cured by the Division of Horticulture 
to speak at the college OB Monday last, 
N'ov. 20. Mr. Harrow is connected with 
the small fruit invest Ration of (he De- 
partment, and the subject of bis public 
talk Monday afternoon was -Native 

Fruits'. 

He spoke of the possibility of the 
elimination of the currant from culti- 
vation due to its menace as a breeder of 
the While Pine Blister Kust . Various 
substitutes for this are being consid- 
ered, especially from the standpoint of 
their value for canning and jellies, lie 

oat lined the recent progreee made in 

the development of the culture of the 
blueberry, of (he btgh bush cranberry, 
end of several species of ehc nies found 
iu the Near P.asl which are BOW being 

experimented on. 

after enjoying rapper at Draper Hall 

wilb membera Of "be faculty, Mr. Har- 
row talked Informally fee ■ short lime 

to the members of the llorl iculture De- 
partment, about the hue Dr. Van Fleet, 
and bis valuable work on fruit culture. 



with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 192S 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - " * laK * 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 



ii 




In every 
package 



The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers, 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



WALTER CUTLER PRESIDENT 
OF TWO YEAR DRAMATIC CLUB 

The members id' ( he Two-year classes 
interested in dramatics met after As- 
sembly. Nov. Ill, and organized a dra- 
matic club. They elected tke following 
Ofncera, all seniors: President, Walter 
Cutler; secretary. Beatrice Kleyla; 
treasurer, Ralph Keiinisoii. These ofli- 
eeta are temporary and will serve for a 
nil. nth. A committee was appointed to 
draw up a constitution. It is the plan 
of the club to give several short plays 

as well as the Commencement play. 

The following men have been 
awarded the isMr as a result of the 
meeting of the athletic board: H. B. 
Wentsch 'M, W. K. Paddock '2:1, K. l,. 
Johnson -2:5, K. K. Williams '2:1. K. W, B. 
Martin 'SB, H. B. Ballet! 'gg, N. D. Bll- 
yard 'SB, H. II. King '24, J. L. Williams 
'gi, S. Myrick '24, B. A. Whitney '24. 

These men represented the college in 
various R. 0. T. C. intercollegiate 
meets last winter. 



T1LLS0N FARM ACQUIRED 
FOR USE OF POULTRY DEPT. 

To Be Used As tiuarantine Farm 
For Pedigreed Stock. Contains 

86 Acres. 
Tillson Karm, located at tke Baal end 

ul l.nvers Lane, has been Iwrned over to 
the poultry department for itntsti«a- 

iionai work. Tin-re are 88 acre* In tke 

farm, which is equipped with lour new 

poultry boaaee, nfhrJfi In alee. Tke 
booaee are fully and modernly equipped, 

and will be used fol Ike Inst time this 

winter to bonne tke pedigreed lock of 
it. I. Beda. 

Kvery bird in the Hock is either the 

dengbterol ■ ben which laid 225 or 

II1()U . Bggi iii her pullet year. Of is I 
pullet which laid at least ld'.t eggs 
before March 1st of her pullet year. A 
rery superior strain of birds is being 
built Up. Some breeding cockerels 
from this Hock have been sold through 
the Slate, and also a number of baby 
chicks and hatching eggs 

Tillson farm is B quarantine farm, 
primarily. In order to protect t be valu- 
able stock from possible infection. 

Consequently no men who keep poultry 
are permitted i" visit it. 



PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Prominent Ahh.hu the 
Fa M8 Makes We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX ST0CKIN6 
At $1.55 

is a anad value for women who want the best 

there Is In a seamless stocking that yet 

will fit the ankles tilmly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly ami proniply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Saw money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9 i 



After Every 
Meal 



DISCUSSION GROUP 

John H. llani.a's discussion group 
will meet as usual on Thursday evening, 
In (lark Hall at seven o'clock. The 
topic for discussion this week will be 

"Proponed Roada lo industrial Beeoe- 

■traction". The topic will be discus-. -d 
from the standpoint of the co-operation 
and I be syndicate and from the socialis- 
tic viewpoint. Many of the students 
are finding Mr. Ilauna's talks of great 
benefit and it is hoped t bat there will 
be 8 large number present next Thurs- 
day evening. 



* v 



.1* 



■& 



Records of Columbia Teachers' Col- 
lege show that some S00 foreign si u- 

denti are iii iis enrollment. OrerfW 
nationalities are represented, and many 

of the entrants have degrees from for- 
eign universities. 



The 

Flavor 

Lasts 






THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

When on the campus, drop in and see our line of Loose-leat Note Books. 

Also Typewriters for Sale or Rent. 



CO-ED NOTES 

A training class in (Jirl Scout leader- 
ship was organized November seventh 
at tbe Abbey, by Miss Marian Troll. 
Miss Troll is conducting similar classes 
al VaBsar. Syracuse, Smith and Mount 
Holyoke Colleges. Tbe MtUM consists 
of ten lessons; one lesson is to be given 
each week on Tuesday evening al six- 
thirty, probably at (Mock bridge Hall. 
The class will be conducted as a troop 
meeting. At the first meeting patroll 
were formed and a general plan of 

work was outlined. 

The second meeting of (he Girl Scout 
training class was held Nov. 14 in 
Stockbridge Hall, Miss Marion TfOtt, 
who conducts the class, acted as cap- 
tain. She explained carefully I lie 
seven requisites of a good troop meet- 
ing and the three types of meetings 
general, special and social. After nil 
the members of the class had learned to 
tie the four knots required for Tender- 
foot Test, a relay race was held to prac- 
tice them. After the regular meeting 
the Court of Honor, eompoeed of the 
captain, patrol leaders, and corporals. 
met for a short time. In all, abont 15 
girls are taking ihis course. 

A girls' rifle club has been organized 

with about 30 members. Club meet- 

ngs are to be held every Wednesday 

afternoon in the Drill Hall, beginning 

this week. 

The S. C. S. met last Thuisday eve- 
ning at the home of Miss Margaret 
Hamlin. After the regular meeting 
the members of the club played games 
and ate cake and icecream. They all 
returned to the Abbey in Miss Hamlin's 
automobile. 



e-* - 



CHRISTMAS JOBS! 

The letter primed below was received 
recently by the Secretary of the college, 
and will be of special interest lo those 
men who wish lo secure work on the 
mails during the Christmas holidays. 
The letter reads as follows: — 

White River Jcl., Vt., Oct. 30, V.nt. 
Secretary, M. A. ('.. 
N mh erst, Mass. 
My dear Sir: 

This office is advised by tbe depart- 
ment under date of Oetober'ilst that all 
iion-eertified substitutes who are em- 
ployed in the Kailway Mail Service, 
whether on K. P. O. lines or in Term- 
inals or Transfer Offices, will be em- 
ployed this year as laborers and paid at 
the rate of $3.63 per day, eight hours 
■institute a day. 
It ig desired that this information be 
posted for the benefit of such students 
as may desire to apply to this office for 
l notary employment during the 
holiday season in order that they may 
be under the impression that tbe 
rate of pay will be the same as last year. 
Any students who desire temporary 
employment in the Kailway Mail Ser- 
vice during the holiday season in this 
ricl should write this office for a p- 
1'ication form and execute the form and 
return it to this office promptly. It will 
tlien be placed on file and in case it is 
found possible to employ the student 
lie will be notified at the earliest date 
practicable. 

Sincerely yours, 
J. M. Abui.kv, 

Chief Clerk. 
Kailway Mail Service. 



ALUMNI 

Alumnus of Note. 
Twenty eight veals ;i»n. the agenl- 
geueral of the ('ape of Good Hope 
Colony searched the stales for an en- 
tomologist. Finally l>r. C. P. I.oiins- 
bury, If, At. !»l, was found and sent 
lo Cape Town. Dr. I.ounsbiiry is now 
regarded as the foremnal economic 
entomologist in Ureal Mritain and 
possessions. He has iisen rapidly in 
the esteem ol llie luiglish and the 

Doers, and with the formation of tbe 
Union of South Africa was placed in 

cbargeofwork againsi crop penis. ID- 
has made several important discoveries 
and his published papers have made 
him known all over the world. He has 

travelled extenelvel] in luatralta, Neu 

Zealand, South America and Kurop. . 
ami is now in the Males studying tbe 
latesl discoveries ol \ mci ican enhonol- 

ogists. 

Dr. I.ounsbiiry is a very broad biolo- 
glsl, mikI was once president of the 

Bontn African aasoctaiion for the \<i 

vancenieiil ol Science, which bestowed a 
medal on him fot discoveries in animal 
disease iransinissioii by ticks. M;in\ 
years ago. be became a cili/.en of South 

Africa, but it is Internet Ing to note tbnt 
bla only eon waa icol lo tbe States fw 

bis education and is a graduate of tbe 

liiivcrsilv of Wiscvsiu. 



Mr. and Mrs. f. K. Cole, Jr.. an- 
nounce the ai rival of a sou. ( airoll 
Vernon, on Nov. \2. 



INTER-COLLEGIATES 

Columbia's youngest sludeiit for the 
vi-ai is Daniel Merman, twelve \t:ii-..| 
age. who comes from Oalvest Texas. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Has it been realized thai the great 
William Shakespeare was a loot hall 
player? The following quotations offer 
proof: 

'Down, down! " — Henry VI. 

■■ A n excellent panel"- Tbe Tempest, 

"A touch, a touch. I do coiitess it '" - 
Hamlet. 

"Well placed:" lle.ll> V. 
"More rushes'."— Ilenrv IV. 

•Til eaten ll are it comes to ground P'— 
Macbeth. 

"Let him not pass but kill him rat her '" 

— Othello. 
"We must have bloody Boneo and 

cracked crowns:" Henry IV. 
"Mut 10 tbe goal:" - -Winter's Tale. 

S/H-ht'/tii'hl Student. 



Athletics at Amherst College are to 

be coached by membera of tbe faculty 

according lO a vole taken by the Student 
Association recently. This system of 

faculty eoacblng waa proposed i>> Pn 

dent Meiklejohn at the conference Ot 

the presidents of 11 New Kngland col- 
leges last spring. 

Rural Engineering Departssemf. 
Professor fjnnnes* assisted by Ibe 
Mural engineering Department has been 

testing out six rotary pumps with water 
from the creek back of the Mower Plant. 
These pumps are of tbe type used in 
pumping water io and from t he emm- 

bury bogs on tbe Cupe. A report giv- 
ing the relative efficiency of these 
pumps is expected by Christmas. 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Huilding, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
A< idemtc A< tivtttea, 

The College Senate, 
Baseball Aasot iation. 
Football Asso( iation. 
Track Association, 
The < lollegian, 
Hot key Asmh iation. 
Masketb. ill Assin iation. 

Roister Doisters, 
The A",gn- Squib, 
Musical ( lulis. 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 

C. s. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 

1-'. P. Kami, Manager 136 R 

Roger H. Friend, President 720 

Perry ('.. Bartlett, afanagei 8325 

fohn M. Whilticr, Manager 170 

Charles \V. Steele, Manager 8325 

Irving \V. Slade, Editor 170 
Hi nest T. l'utnaiu, Manager 

Philip B. Dowden, Manager 8336 

(iustav Ijudsko^, Manager 530 

T. T. Abel.-, Kditoi 8330 

Thomas I,. Snow, Manager 720 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, O, B. Folsom, Minager 8314 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard M Smith, Manager 8314 
M. A.. C. Christian Association, Frederick B. Cook, President 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

It you an* in need of an)' kind ot Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store ami ask us to show you whatever you may be 
interested in. It you don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because eye are doing business on this 
basis. V. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satislied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1. 70 

Rubber heels ot" any kind, 50 t ts per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are Ooodyear welt. 

AfflHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE HUTDAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 



J 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 22, 1922. 



_ LOOKING AHEAD TO THANKSGIVING 

Vaj£*Z U no, *, aW A****, your ^* «*. ft'. «*. ** *~ - ^ >~r neu, »W 
ftoercoa, anrf a neu, Ha, a/u^s ne/p, ,our appearance. ^ MJurmm , ,-2l<J,T 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



ASSEMBLY 

Continued from p»ge 1 



Freshmen going 10 Tut Ik be allowed 
to wear ordinary hats instead of their 
Freshman caps was referred to the 

Senate. 
Inquiries were made concerning the 

cost of a week's board at Draper Hail. 
Last year the price paid fol student 
|»bof was lowered, hut there lias been 

no corresponding lowering o! the price 

Of board. The cost ol hoard at Diaper 
ball per week this year is six dollars 
and ninety-five cents; last year it was six 
dollars and tifty cents per week. The 
cost this year is very close to what 
board OOeU the student. Mr Kciiney 
will he glad to talk over with any stu- 
dent facts eoaeeraiag prices of hoard. 

The fact that quite a nuniher of si u 
dents have been doing reading and 
studying during cfiapel and Assembly 
was commented upon. There is a regu- 
lation concerning this matter which 
students have been neglecting. 

Professor Curry Hicks speech orged 
every student who could go to the Tufts 
game by the special train. He said 
that the trip would be well worthwhile 
Memories of such trips are one of the 

beat parte of eollege life. Uolng down 

on the train would mean going down 
with the team. Thai fact alone should 
make every one go on the train. A lew 

ream ago all of fbe student body who 
was planning to attend a Tufts game 
would have none down by train. There 
are so many other means of transporta- 
tion now that fewer people plan to take 
the special train for boston. 'The time 
may come when it will be impossible 
for the students of a college to go to- 
gether in this way to a game. That line 
has not yet come. Professor Hicks 
hoped that at least two hundred would 
si nn up for the trip. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL SPEAKERS 
1922 1923 

Nov. -i'i. Dean Thomas Alkie Clark, 

rjoiv. of Illinois, Urbane, 111. 

Dee. It).- ltev. John Havocs Holmes, 

The Community chinch. New fork. 

Dee. 17. Blabop Logan A. boots. 
New York. 

Jan. 7. -bishop I'.dwin II. Hughes. 

Maiden. 

Jan. 14. -Dean Charles It. brown, 
Vale I'liiversily. New Haven. Conn. 

Jan. 21. -Hev. Vanghan Dabney, 
Second Congregational church, boston. 

Jan 28. Mi. Allied K. Stearic, 
l'rinc. Phillips Academy, Andover. 

Feb. 4. -lbv. Moses It. l.o\ell, Colll- 
munitv Church, Durham N. 11. 

l-vi,. ll. Bev. Hobert W. Coe, First 
Congregational church. Norwood. 

I'd,. IS Dean James \. Heche. Boe- 
ton Pniveisity . Hoeton. 

Peb. 86. -Dr. Daniel A. Poling, 

United Society of Christian Kndea vor. 

Hoeton. 

March 4.- Dr. Nehemiah Boynton, 
The Church ol Peace ITiioii.N'cw York. 

March ll. - To be announced. 

March 18. Dr. W. K. Gtlroy, Bdltor 
Tht CongregationaUat, boston. 

April 1. Mr. Wilbur K. Thomas, 
American Friends Service Committee, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 

April 8, bev. B. B. Boblneon, Hol- 

yoke. 

April IT).- bev. K.C. Mac Arthur. Old 
Cambridge Baptist church. Cambridge. 

April 88.— Rot. James O. Gllhey, Bo. 
Congregational Chareh, Springfield. 

April -'!». -Mr. P. Whltwell Wilson, 

New Yolk City. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at geesmwiW* Prices. 
Informal* m Specialty 

IS go. rtoapert tit araherst, Maai 

Tml. 8BB-M 



S. S. HYDE 

opilolnn «»•««! Je»WWe*lSSr 

•.) Pleasant Street (up one glgM ■ 

1 Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Kg Hen Alarm (locks ami ..the. KeliaMe Mak. M 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Bo, row preietaa ticket horn g.Qawsss'g 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all ttw 

Mesaaan ftstsss. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Morn* Brom. Neckwear 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine (irocerles 
Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



ilr.l-i KMT next Suit M D»«reoSt here n„« 
Beit MlwHona »f Woolen* In the latest i>:.t 
S^SoaMsl it,, loul.nualnv.. ...o 
»,,ii, is apparanl <>n n»« ganMSBta iry us. 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdafher. 

11 A mil > St. Next t.. Western li.ion Tel. OHi. .■ 



o| 



College Footwear 

in Western Massaclms.Us 
and AT LOW 1" KICKS 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



CRANBERRY INSECT PESTS 
BEING STUDIED AT WAREHAM 



I NCOSPOH V I BO 

ro-sTfl in^ii St., 

Tel. WB2 10S3 



Ilolyoke 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop 



SING LEE 

Main Strett 

Quick Laundry 



FROM SNAKE TO SERUM 

There is tniioh to stir llie imagination 
in the picture of an angry, writhing, 
poisoanai annhe pissed firmly to the 
operating tshle in the reptile bonne al 

the Zoo, and encouraged by a scientist 

to strike at a bit of parchment covering 

a glass retainer. Instead of destroying, t |,,. apeelal insect pests ol the eranberry 

the snake la I bus enlisted In t lie work I r nest . Extension Schools were held 

of saving human life. j sometimes out OB a bog and sometimes 



An Example of Good Work Carried 
on by Dr. H. J. Franklin '23, for 

the Growers. 
An Interacting extension project lias 
been developed at the Cranberry Sob- 
station in Waieham bf Dr. II •' Frank- 

lle 'OS. Starting early In the aprlngi 
Isrge groan ol crnnberrj grower* have 
been meeting from time lo time t>> study 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office- $1.00 

Sl. 10 bf mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



From the snake house, his poison is 
shipped to the laboratory, and thence 
to Brazil, where the Brazilian govern- 
me nt runs n large eerarn plant, Long 



;it tiie station. l'.ach grower came 
equipped With a net and under Dr. 

Franklin's guidance the insects weir 

caught and studied in ever> static id 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



years of study have developed a met hod their life history. Sometimes the meet' 



of procuring serum by injecting minute 

quantities of the poison of a given 

species into a horse. Oradually the 
doses are increased, until its blood be- 
gins lo manufacture an antidote to th's 
special poison and eventually becomes 
immune to it. From t lie blood of the 
horse the antidote is extracted and this 
in turn is preserved and sent to hospi- 
tals so t hat it may tie used to cure per- 
sons Battering from snake bite. The 
reason that Brazil leads the world in 
this particular lield of science is that 
over 15,000 persons are said to lie killed 
there annually by poisonous snakes. 
— Harvard ' rim-son. 



lags were called together bast 11] in re 
spouse to a telephone messsge from Dr. 

Franklin saying that a certain insect 
u;is just in the critical stage of transi- 
tion and must be studied al once. 

These cranberry schools have been of 
great prsctlesl value as well as intense! 

to the growers. They are only one of a 
great many remarkable lervicee ex- 
tended by Dr. Franklin who ranks as 

lending expert in the cranberry indns- 

•22. -Roger W. Blakely began work 
as an instructor in animal husbandry at 
I Cornell Nov. 0. 



« 



1\0*5 



tore 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. 



Ma** 



C&rp*rvter & Morchous*, 

PRINTET 




No r, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass 




1922 

AaHoi ( Unreal 
C< jiiefire 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



No. 9 



MUSICAL CLUBS STAGE 

CONCERT AT CONWAY 



Twenty-five Men Make Trip on First 

Concert. Next appearance at 

Hatfield, Dec. 6. 

The first concert of the College Musi- 
cal (Jlnbs was presented in the Town 
Mall in Conway, Mass., on Friday cu- 
lling, Nov. 24. The eooeert was given 
under the auspices of the I'uirent Top- 
iesClnbef the town, and the hall was 
well tilled with an audience whieh was 
not a bit afraid to show its appreciation 
of the Clubs. The first concert may be 
considered a deeided •aeeSSS, although 
this is not always the case. 

Twenty-five men, including the mana- 
gers, made the trip, leaving the Me 
morial Building in automobiles at B f.M. 
Supper was served soon after they 
arrived in town in the Conway <oiigrc- 
g&tional church. The members then, 
in the hour before the concert, saw 
some of the sights of Conway, not the 
least of which was the excellent Me- 
morial Library donated by Marshall 
Field, a native resident of the town. 

The concert opened nt eight with 
asong by the (ilee Club. This was fol- 
lowed by an orchestra select ion, a clarinet 
solo by Fuller '23, and then by a man 
dolin specialty act. Another special 
feature of the program was a short 
scene enacted by Weatherwax '24, who 
accompanied the Clubs as reader. The 
(ilee Club appeared three times on 
the program, the Orchestra twice and 
Quarret once; all were well received by 
the audience. 

Coach Worthley and Mellen '21, as a 
member of the faculty, made this trip 
with the clubs. The next concert is 
planned for Wednesday night, Dec. 6, 
at Hatfield, at which time Ladies Night 
will be observed by the Men's Club of 
that town. 




MICHIGAN AGGIES DEFEAT 
DEMORALIZED MASS. TEAM 



M. A. C. VARSITY, 1922 



DEAN CLARK DEFINES "THE I BETTER PRODUCTS FEATURED 
BEST WE GET FROM COLLEGE" I AT POULTRY AND EGG SHOW 



YOUR NOTE IS DUE! 
PAY UP! 

A note for 130,000 on the Memorial 
Building has to be met soon or else ii 
continues at the rate of six or seven 
p«>r cent interest. 

It is earnestly desired that upper- 
classmen will clear up their unpaid 
pledges as soon as possible so that the 
unecessary burdens of interest may DO-l 
have to be coped with. 

The present class standings in un- 
paid pledges are as follows: 

1923, *27HS.2.-, 

1924, $1127.31 

1925, $158.32 



Mrs. F. E. Briggs of Portland, Maine, 
is acting as substitute house mother at 
the Abigail Adams House during Mrs. 
Marsh's illness. Mrs. Briggs is a grad- 
uate of Bates College and has been a 
school-teacher. 



Foremoet Dean of Men in Sunday 

Chapel Emphasizes Need for Less 

Activities and More Studies. 

Those who heard lleanTliomas Arkle 
Clark of the 1'niversiiy of Illinois in 
(Ml Sunday's chapel had an opportu- 
nity to lind what the true purpose of a 
college life should be from a man whose 
long intimacy with college life jusl ili.-s 
his conclusions 

"The tendency of the modern youth 
is not to concern itself with the future. 
The average college man is tStttSsd to 
simply ''get by". Voting men do not 
,. V en com', in themselves with an intel- 
lectual, let alone amoral or spiritual 
salvation. And yet a man's bsppioess, 

resonreefninese and social standing all 
defend on his training. You do not 
change much when you leave coll.-e. 
College simply crystallizes your ten- 
dencies and habits 

"The question confronting us then is 
•What should we get Inou eollsg 
The practical, the money return fiom 
inline. liate use of studies is being ein- 
phaized everywhere in the country. 
The true knowledge of the practical. 
1 however, comes from the normal allot- 
■me.it of a life of sixty years. On the 
other baud, many put far too much time 
Into activities than they have a right to. 
I Activities often give tangible results, 
but such are not the most worth while. 
"What we should get from college It 
a mind trained to think clearly and a 
appreciation of life's ideals. "From 
those tasks whose completion we lind 
the easiest we get the least value. It is 
the hard work in doing things that 
gives us the best training. It is not 
primarily the facts that we are after, 
Continued on p*g« 7 



Turkey Auctioned Off Saturday at 

Sixth Annual Showing of Dressed 

Market Fowl. 



The Sixth Annual Dressed 1'oiillry 

and Egg sll,,w waH n,,,<l *■ itockbrldgs 

Hall Friday end Saturday. Nov. 24 and 
25. In staging the show the poultry 
department desired to encourage belter 
methods of preparing poultry 'products 

before offering them fat sale and to 

make the finished product more attrac- 
tive, t lier.hy Increasing ibS consump- 
tion of both poultry and eggs. 

Tfcs snow rep r ese n ted primarily Lbe 

culmination of the market poultry and 
egg work in the two-year and four-year 
courses. The exhibits also consisted ol 
entries from farmers and commercial 
poultry men, students of egricoltoml 
schools, hoys' and girls elnbs, and M. 
A. C. faculty. 
Comparative ribbon awards were 

given t he exhibitors of broilen,rossten, 

capons, and eggs. The judge was Mr. 
Walter Mailman of Hanson. 

A novel feature of the show v\a~ I !!• 
pound live turkey exhibited lo be sold 
to the highest bidder. All other poul- 
try ex hibited was graded and priced. 
The proceeds of the sale of exhibits 
held Saturday afternoon went to the 
exhibitors. 



VARSITY BASKETBALL MEN 
TO BE CALLED OUT DEC. 4 

^»it'>» basketball practice starts 
,j afternoon, Dec. 4. at 4-:i0 v. vi. 
The more men there are out from 
which to pick the squad the better 
chances the team will have of coming 
through with a successful season. 
Candidates see Manager Dowden about 
equipment. 



One-sided Contest Results in 45—0 

Defeat. Mohor ActinK Captain 

of Team. Tumey Injured. 

The "lilt tie iCianls" journeyed out to 

Baal Lauttlng, Michigan, last Sntnrdny 

t.. plav Ibeir last game in IMS, and 

the lirst Intersections! game lu lbe his 
lory of lbe college, wlin i new "nnnsn 
mite" rival, Miebignn Agricultural 

College. The Bssl Lansing aggrega- 
tion was superior to the New Kngland 
team and romped oil w it h a 45 m-oic. 
In lbe absence id < !spl fi ray SOS, Mohor 
'2:i was actios captain during this 

tame. 
a ligbl covering of enow epresd over 

the field when I he lied and the Ciccn 

twentered Aggies Hoed up i"i the 
opening klekoff ibortly after 2 ..'clock 

on Saturday. In spile of the small 
snow sloi 111 the lield was tail ly last, and 
the gray skies and low lempeiat un- 
made playing conditions lavoiable. 
There was little or no wind tbrougbool 
the game. The crowd was one of the 
largest Of the sci-oii due to the fact 

that the Michiganites wire celebrating 

Home Coming Day, which one-ponds 
to our Alumni Da\ 

Mass. Aggie won the loss and chose 
to receive, defending the north goal. 
Captain Johnson kicked off for Michi- 
gan. A lateral pass was attempted. 
BesJ to Harrows, on Mass SB yard line 
which was missed, the hall going out - 
,,,lc (in the lirsi play, the team 

luinbiedand it was i lie westerners 1 ball. 

They tailed lo make 10 yards in three 
downs, and Uobinsoti attempted a place- 
ment goal which missed by less than a 
yard. The ball was put in play on our 
90-yard line, and in an exchange ..I 
punts «m gained 18 vaids. It was on 
this play that "Id" Tumcy, Massa- 
chusetts" star punier. Iracturc.l the 
small bone in his left leg, and had lo 
leave the Held. Hal rows did all the 
kicking from then on, and his work 
excellent. The visitors made their 
lirst tiisl down ol the game, and then 
Johnson intercepted a forward pass and 
ran half the length of the Held bef OtS 
he was driven ollsi.le on his opponents' 
tS-yard line. On two passes, our rivals 
reached the S-yard line, and three more 
plays resulted in the tiist touchdown. 
RoblnSOH failed lo kick the goal. 
Mohor kicked oil to II nil man who ran 

i he ball back to bleeV-yard line. Thej 

worked forward passes and line bucks 
with much success straight down the 
field for a second score by (ioode, Rob- 
inson's kick being allowed . as a M 
achusetts man was oft side. The liist 
oaartet ended soon ftfiS! with the ■O OIS 
l:', in Michigan's favor. 

The second qttSTtST was similar lo the 

first in that the Massachusetts learn 

I was unable lo stand the onslaught of 

j the Michigan Farmers, and two more 



(fl f I 



■ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



touchdowns and a goal increased the 
score to 26-0 at the end of the half. 
Their quarterback, Richards, was in- 
jured in this quarter and was carried 
from the field. Heal made a 23-yard 
run, and a pass, Harrows to Mars Inn an, 
netted 10 yards more. This was the 
only time The Little (Jianls were able 
to penetrate their line in this half. 



quarter, saved our goal several times by 
clean, hard tackles. 








<m 


1 

















ul f w 




* 








J 






BE 



Vkhnon I). Muooett '23, I,, o. 

In the third quarter, Mass. Aggie 
received the kickoff, but their line was 
impregnable and we were forced to 
kick. Mctieoch then intercepted a 
forward pass and ran 40 yards through 
a broken field for one of the prettiest 
runs of the game until he was tackled 
uear midtield. The Mate. Aggies were 
scored on twice more but only one goal 
was successful, the score betag 30-0 in 
Michigan's favor. 

In the last quarter our defence tight- 
ened so that they were able to cross the 
last white line only once, and then 
missed the goal, making the final score 
45-0 in favor of the Michiganites. 

The lineup: 

MA88.M HIKKTTB MM 111(1 AN 

Marshtuan, le re.ltobinson 

re, McGregor 
Salman, It rt, Teufer 

Marx.lt it. II. Swansiin 

Mudgett, lg rg, Morrison 

My rick, lg ra, Robeson 

Alger, c c, Eckerman 

Abele, c e, Marrison 

Nowers, rg lg, Taylor, Thorpe 

Mohor, rt (acting Capt.) It, Eckert 

It, II. Swan so n 
Sargent, re le, Hull man 

Bike, re le. Kipke 

Barrows, qb qb, Richards, MacMillan 

qb, Crane 
Turaey, lhl> rhb,Goode 

Ferranti, lhb rhb, Beckley 

Pierce, lhb rhb, Burris 

Beal, rhb lhb, Johnson, (Capt.) 

lnb, Brady, Frank 
McGeoch, fb fb, Lioret, Neller 

Score — Michigan 45, Massachusetts 0. 
Referee — Gardner, Yale. Umpire — 
Mallard, Michigan. Head linesman — 
Mitchell, Michigan. Time— 16 minute 
periods. 



The Lansing papers gave us a weight 
advantage but the fact is our team was 
outweighed about 15 pounds per man. 



After cp^inp « s.mda y aftern oo n in the invigorating winter air, come into our 



SIDE LIGHTS 

"Bob" Mohor captained the team 
and played a real game, tearing 
through and smashing up Michigan 
players time and again. 



The team was given a welcome sur- 
prise at 1'ittsfield when Hevan '13, 
Lockwood '20, and Waite '21 hopped on 
long enough to give the boys a hand. 



"Red" Darling '10, George Uonnell 
'15, and Moyes '12 were in Lansing to 
give the team a welcome, and a num- 
ber more of the alumni were at the 
game. 



It was hard to lose "Ed" Tumey, 
when his punting counts so much. He 
got off two long punts, one for over 60 
yards, even after his leg was broken. 



"Duke" Curran, captain of I he crack 
1015 team came up from Chicago. A 
better exhibition next lime, "Duke"! 



This is the real "Aggie" spirit'— 
Margaret Perry '22 came from thirty-five 
miles outside of Montreal to welcome 
the team on its arrival at the big Cana- 
dian city. 



"Bob" Holmes and "Hob" Skinner, 
both '19', were waiting for the team at 
Montreal, loo, and had taken the effort 
to find a good place for the boys to have 
supper. 



'Mace" said he knew when he crossed 
the border for he felt the jar going over 
the Canadian Pipe Line. 



By the way, "Hob" Mohor lias the 
distinct honor of being the only play tt 
on the team who has played every min- 
ute of every game this season. 



HOCKEY TEAM PREPARING 

FOR DIFFICULT SCHEDULE 



Tale, Cornell, Williams, and Dart- 
mouth Signed Up. Twenty-three 
Men out for Team. 

The first hockey practice of the seas- 
on was held Monday afternoon on the 
Drill Hall Moor. The afternoon was 
taken* up with shooting goals and get- 
ting the familiar feel of the stick. 
Twenty-three men signified their inten- 
tions of coming out for the team. 
The coming cold weather should fur- 
nish ice for out door practice in a short 
time. "Doc" Gordon, captain, and 
"Shorty" Hodsdon are the only veter- 
ans left from last year's team. There 
are, however, a number of second string 
men from last year which are available 
and from whom much is expected this 
winter. With this material to draw 
from and the new men which will be 
out Coach Collins expects to turn out 
a topnotcher. The schedule, which 
has not as yet been entirely completed, 
will be announced later, and will in- 
clude games with Yale. Cornell, Wil- 
liams, and Dartmouth. These games, 
with others which will be arranged, 
will be as hard a schedule as the team 
has encountered for some time. 



"Bobby" Barrows, playing defensive 



FRESHMAN DEBATING. 

The Freshman Debating Team which 
will debate Salem High School at Salem 
on December 8th, has been chosen. It 
consists of E. Dodge, L. Novick, O. 
Rogers, andT. Grant as alternate. The 
team will leave wi'h their Coach, Man- 
ager Sandow, Friday morning, ami will 
be entertained that evening by the 
Salem team. 




restaurant and satisfy the appetite that the 



out-of-doors puts into you. 

YE AGGI 



INN 



Open until n-oo p. m. on all nights but Saturday, closed at 7-00 p. m. on Saturday. 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 

Henry Jmwett'm Rmpmrtory Company 

Tlmrmlay afternoon and i\.ninii. Irlilay 
evening. Saturdaj afternoon and evening. 

Nov. W. I>ec. 1 anil I, tlx- •▼•* popular 

farcical comedi b» Ao«tutin l>ai>. 



"ANIGHT OFF" 



Monday. TUMdai and WtdOMdai afternoon, 

Dec. 1. B and <>• Hoi i<nr Ptetarea. 
"THE STORM" 
with Home Petert and Virginia Valll. 



A REAL THANKSGIVING 

There will be lots of sentiment, family 
gatherings, and naturally a turkey dinner. 

Kuppenheimer 

GOOD CLOTHES 

make you look right for Thanksgiving 
and on any occasion. 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 






PERFUMES ARE ALWAYS AN ACCEPTABLE GIFT 

We Have a full line of 

Coty's L'Origan, from $1.00 to $4.50 

Houbigant's, Quleque Hours, from $1.00 to $5.00 

Roger & Galletts, Helitrope and Violet de Parme, Yardley's, 

Freesia and April Violets Perfumes in $1.00 and $3.50 sizes 



Vanidor Beauty Cases at $3.50 

Djerkiss Gift Sets $4.25 

Houbigant's Quelque Fleurs Gift Sets at $10.00 

Ambre Royal Gift Set in Fancy Basket $10.00 

Yardley's Gift Sets $5.00 

4711 Gift Sets at $2.75 and $4.00 

Mary Garden Conf ret at • $4.00 

Face Powders in all the popular makes. 
Bath Salts, Soaps and Talcum Powders, Eyebrow Pencils, Lip Sticks, 

Rouges and Creams. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



THERE ARE NO FINER 

Overcoats 

than those tailored for us by Hart Schaffner & Marx. 

Don't make the mistake of buying your coat before you see 

these. 



Sheep-lined Coats, 
Mackinaw Shirts at 



$10.00 to $33.50 
$5.00 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Why Young Men Should 
Consider Insurance Selling 

Seven Reasons for Life Insurance Career 

LlFE INSURANCE is founded on the 
highest ideals. 

It is capable of yielding a good income and the 
satisfaction of accomplishment. 

It offers opportunities for real leadership. 

It brings insurance salesmen in close associa- 
tion with big business and big business men. 

It requires education in business methods, 

law and finance. 

It is a field for workers, not shirkers. 

It is an alluring and practical calling for men 
ot dynamic energy. 




irance Company 

or Boston. Massachusetts 



N. E. STATE COLLEGES IN 
SIX-CORNERED CONFERENCE 



Freshman and One-year Rules are 

Adopted on Uniform Basis. N.H. 

State College the Sponsor. 

The following MOT item was printed 
in I lie Boctoa llrral'l under date of 

Nov. M; 

BoattM, Nov. -2H. — A New Finland 
state OOltegt conference, patterned after 
the \ventern conference, and deelgsed 
to formulate uniform eletfibility riilen 
in inteivolleuiate athletic*, was orjjan- 
i/c<l at a meeting of repreNentative* of 
New England state college* and uni- 
versities here today. 

\n eligibility code barring partici- 
pation of freshmen on competing teams, 
tad establishing a one-year residence 
rule designed to prevent the appear- 
IDMOI teams of athletics transferred 
from other colleges, was adopted. 

The meetinu today was the result of 
an invitation issued recently by the 
New Hampshire Slate college and rep- 
resentatives were present from the 
■poMOtlaj college, rnisersily of Maine, 
lni\eisity of Vermont, State College of 
abode Island, Connecticut Agricultural 
College, and the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Ooll«g«. The conference will 
b«ve juiisdiciionoverall intercollegiate 
sports among member colleges, it was 

■started. 




KOLONY KLUB HOLDS 

INITIATION BANQUET 



With a *Scotch Mist, who 
minds even if it comes clown in 
buckets ! 

Rainproof 1 

Handsome Scottish cheviots 
woven after our own formula. 

Made up into smart Fall over- 
coats, golf suits, caps. 

Fine, rain or shine. 

•lteui*1tn>l Tniihntnrk. 



Thirty-One New Members Taken into 
Two-Year Club. 

The Two-Year Kolony Klub held their 
annual initiation banquet and corpora- 
tion meeting last Saturday evening in 
Draper Hall, about 10 attending. "A!" 
(randall gave an address of welcome 
to the :H initiates, and Clarence TuifTs 
made (he response for the new members. 
The alumni were represented hy Carl E. 
|,il»by and the faculty hy Prof. IMielan. 
both Of whom made shoit addresses. 
Prof. .ludkins and Mr. Viet/ were also 
present as guests. 

Following the banquet, the yearly 
Corporation Meeting was held, in order 
I.! arrange business and elect ottieeis 
l„r the coming year. Harold W. Smart, 
faenltj advisor for the Club, handled 
i be meeting until the election of Gerald 
ll.iskMis as president of the corporation 
rot a term of one year. B. W. Stickney 
was elected director for three years, and 
Carl Sutton was reelected secretary for 
another year. 

The banquet committee which had 
charge of the arrangements was nun- 
posed ot Harold M. Bebattser, H. \V. 
Stickney, Francis J. McNamara and 
William H. Tufts. 



Koiii'.ns 


Pkrt Company 


Broadway 
at 13th St. 

Broadway 
at Warren 


Herald square 

"Four at 36th St 
Convenient 
Corners" Fifth Aw. 

at 41st St. 


NKW 


YORK CITY 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good thing* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.416-W) lUdler. Mm 



FINAL TRY-OUT 

come laeai tti Nei keya between »-oo a. *. 

|>ec. 4tli. unil S .'«) p. M.. I >«•>■. Kith. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rrnxmll Store 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management, 

P. I). ROMANS, 

Prop. 
Tel. 48a- w 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Hitchen 



Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 






*• 



tf 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, t922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



of players from which to draw in case 
of emergency. Honorable mention ti 



[•VISA W\ Hi.ai.k "W Rdltor-tn-Thlef 

LDTHBB It. Aruisoion '2S Managing Kditiir 

I)KI" \i; I Ml \ I II i: a i«s: 



Editorial. 

Atlileti' s. 

A <-:i<l«-ni !• h. 

( llllipilH. 



h;\ is,, w. si mm •■::< 
A I .SSST k. w a i a«*M 
l.i u i- II. Kin M II 

I.I TUB* It. AliltlNOIoN "23 

.Ions <i- BBSS ''-'* 

CHAR] Hi 9, <>i iv ik. .lit. ft 

R< ill M. Wooi> tt 

U I kxncis Kkvnm.y "M 

John M. Whittikk '28 



.1 in- ih.se iiicn who played Ihroagb the 

season in substitute positions or on B 
:i nit C teams with DO chance of reward 
ami no hope of advance. A little 
chunk of Ihe pluck of these nien in a 
larger proportion Of the undergraduates 
who exist as ornaments aliout the 

eon pai without even enough initiative 

to keep "IT the Dean's Board would help 
the team far more than cheers. Next 
year will present an opportunity to 

remedy this fault. Take it and prove 
your worth ! 



DEAN CLARK SPEAKS AT 1N- 
TE RF RATERNHT CONF ERE NCE 



FMutty. 

Alumni. 
Two- Year. 
Kxc'liaiiue and 
Communications, SATO COBBB V 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
Owkn K. VSUOS "■ Business Manager 

ROBBST K. ITSSSS "SI Advertising Manager 
CUfffOBD L, Hfi okn II < Imitation Manager 

n.iNAi.o w. Lswts*s1 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-Hass matter at the A inherit 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 110S, Act 
of October. 1017 authorized August '20. 1918. 



Tin- next issue of the CofXBOIAS will 
!„• mi Dec. IS. This will he the only 
isMie between Thanksgiving and Christ- 
mas. 



To Sum Up. 
In dedication tbto issue to the foot- 
hall team the COIXSOIAS feels that it 
issnminar'uing one of the most spirited 1 
and well played BSSSOBI that an 4ggt« 
team has ever cnjo\ed. No doubt the 
meniory of three defeats raises some 

qasstlos M to the tncesas of the pies 
cut team, hut these defeats were suf- 
fered at the hands of three good teams, 
and only the Issl game smacked of a 
walk-away for the opponents. Few 
teams retain thai drive and pertinent 
stamina which is so necessary for vic- 
tory, when their captain is missing, 
and evidently, this years" footl.all team 
keenly fell that hiss by proving to be 
no exception to the rule. 

('online from the depths ol the D>21 
failure on the gridiron, football has 

again set itself on the Bra ground of a 
creditable performance with ao lowering 

of the standards of eligibility in the 
meantime. ProfeeeOt Micks has IbsIs- 

ted that the strides! scholarship rules 
he enforced. In spile of this fact, how- 
ever, few if any athletes who started 
I lie season have dropped below in their 
studies. Such is the achievement of an 

unbending regulation. It must be ob- 
served and therefore, every effort is 
made by the individual to comply to 

the best of his sbility. 

The same high spirit which has 
characterized the team has character- 
ized t he st udent body . Mass meetings 

have draws s major portion of the stu- 
dents to participate and have raised 
enthusiasm, "pep," anil loyalty to a 
superior level. "Crabbing" has been 
conspicuous by its absence. 

The same fault with the actual sup- 
port gives on the field can be found 
this year as in oihcr years. Inade- 
quate numbers of men on the minor 
toot ball teams handicapped the varsity 
malerially. It is impossible to go 
through a seas.. n with eleven men. 
There must be a much greater supply 



The Red Cross Drive. 

Does the Red Cross deserve support 
this year? Evidently the major por- 
tion of Ihe undergraduates believe that 
with the end of the war came ihe end 
Of the Bed Cross movement. Results 
of the campaign tor membership last 
week resulted in little over one hun- 
dred subscriptions. One hundred 
twenty-live subscriptions OUt of a total 
ol over six hundred students— a line 
showing in BO sense of the word. The 
agricultural pursuits could not have 
been very remunerative last summer Ol 
else the student is gBSrdlBg each 
shekel with an eye on (he future in an 
entirely surprising manner. 

But to gel down to facts, the results 
say that the Bed Cross no longer needs 
our support. The response was defi- 
nite, unbelievably stein and tree of 
any desire to aid society in general. 
The Senior Class was the only light in 
the fog, taking Ihe lead with a ">0% sub- 
scription. It took the lead as it should, 
but nobody followed. The Juniors 
trailed behind, and the w.rthy Fresh- 
man group condescended to entrust 
|8 nt> to the care of the collectors. 
Success in class activities has turned 
the Freshman mind, so that it refuses 
to respond to the ordinary calls of col- 
lege life ; omy the nob.e activities of 
1BB6 can be cared for at one time. 
It is necessaiy that we look beyond 
oar owe doors Into the rest of the 
country, bury our sellishness, and aid 
a cause which is worthy of the warm- 
est support year after year. 



Emphasizes Need of Better Scholar- 
ship and more TJpperclassman 
Influence. 

Dean Clark's final message to M. A. 
C. was given at the Inlerfraternity Con- 
ference Banquet last Monday night. 

Scholarship should be stressed lolhe 
utmost and fraternities should stand for 
high standing in scholastic as well as 

in activity work;these were emphasised 

and were the same as the points made 
in Monday chapel. 

In regards to Iiiteifraternil y repre- 
sentatives, he said that (he man sent 
from the fraternity should be a leader 
and interested in the inside life of Ihe 

fraternity, There sre two types of atea 

who help the fraternity : men who are 
active in college and advertise the fra- 
ternity; then the men who help run 
the house and the affairs of the chapter, 
and are willing to give their time and 
energy to Ihe work. The same princi- 
ple applies to the leadership of the 
fraternity. 

Furthermore, upperc lassmen should 
be examples in conduct and scholarship 
for the Fresh men and Sophomores, and 
should make the underclassman con- 
form to rules which will compel study. 

The New York Interfraternity meeting 
will undoubtedly discuss the scholar- 
ship queatiOB further. 



Town Hall, Amherst 



TENTH ANNUAL ALUMNI DAY 
TO BE HELD JANUARY 19-20 



"COLLEGE SHOULD TEACH 

FACTS" SAYS DR. WHEELER 



Alumnus Holds that Practical Teach- 
ing is More Important Than Gen- 
eral Education. 

The speaher in last weeks' Assembly, 
Nov. 88, was Dr. Homer Jay Wheeler, 
M. A. C. K5. Dr. Wheeler is at present 
connected with the American Agricult- 
ural Chemical Company. 

Dr. Wheeler said that the student of 
today does not need the classics and 
that an agricultural education does not 
necessarily need lo be totally different 
from any other type of education. He 

stressed the point that it was seecesssry 

to give a great deal of time to the 
acquiring Of basic principles and in 
accumulating fads which one may use 
as the occasion may arise. Dr. Wheeler 
said that the farmer needs just as much 

Imagination as a professional man 
needs now for there is continually 
arising new problems with which the 
farmer must cope. 

Dr. Wheeler thinks that the average 
college of today gives altogether too 
much time and sliulv to unnecessary 
tilings and not enough time to the 
really practical, bed-rock ideas upon 
which the industries of the country are 
run. 



Alumni to Speak in Classes. Am- 
herst-M. A. C. Hockey Game and 
Fraternity Initiations. 

The tenth annual mid-winter alumni 
day reunion is to be held this year on 
Friday and Saturday, .Ian. til and 2(1. 
The program will probably be as 
follows: 

Friday — Alumni will speak in classes, 
replacing professors as far as possible. 
In ihe evening there will be a Musieal 
Clubs concert and a one-act play staged 
by the Roister Doisters in Bowker 
Auditorium. 

Saturday morning— Rusiness meeting 
of the Associate Alumni. 

Noon— Dinner for Alumni, Faculty 
and Students. 

Afternoon— Amhcrst-M. A. C hockey 
game at M. A. C — A relay track meet. 

Evening — Fraternity initiation ban- 
quets. 

A committee for the reunion has 
been appointed consisting of Trescott 
Abele '2:5 chairman, William Wood '24. 
Andrew Love '25. Mr. Watts, Mr. Mel- 
len, Prof. Hicks and Prof. Kami. 



RED CROSS CAMPAIGN 

The results of the Red Cross cam- 
paign held recently at the college, is as 
follows, except lor a few subscriptions 
from the Two-year Course. 

lftgg— 46 

1924-84 
1986—81 
1898- 8 



THANKS(il\ IN<; DAY 

1'U I ATTKACI'ION 

nursuay Mary p ic nford in"Th« uv* 

Light." An entirely different 
■tor; and an absorbing new 
eharactertxatlon Han any- 
thing in which she has heie 
tofore appeared. The prodno- 

Mat. 3. hve. , l( , n j|t blvtah and the photog- 

6-45, 8-30 rapliy wonderful. 

News Comedy 



Friday 



Mat 3, Eve. 
6-45,8-30 



S turday 



.Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Monday 



Tom Mia m "The Fighting 
Streak." A speedy story with 

a half dozen new and singular 
twists to it. Filmed amidst 
the peaks and plateaus of the 
Kocky Mts. 

Sport Review. "Play the 

Game." 

'j-reel Sunshine Comedy 

Wyndham Standing. Regi- 
nald Denny. Alma Tell and 
Betty Carpenter in "The 
Iron Trail," Rea Beach's 

1 1 eiiiendous Alaskan Railroad 
drama. 

News 

Larry Semon in "Between 
the Acts." 

Poultry Show— 
NO PICTURES 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing and Printing 

Mills Studio Phone 456-R 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

nkw ri:i( ks 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels . . . $2.50 
Men n Half Sole*. Ituldirr HreW . . . $1.75 
Men's Rubber Holes. Kutther Heels . . $2.25 

Urn's Half Boles $1.35 

Work (;uaranteed-AMHKK8T HOUSE 



Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

CtCStl and Cigarettes- Hpecia. price per carton 
on cigarettes. 

Hcliiatlt's Chocolates and other leading lines. 
Cracker a and Canned Good a 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Stiidin-M AS» MIC Bl4 M 'K— Northampton. 

Club Night Dances— ixipular with M. A. <'. Men. 

Private Lessens by Appointment 

Telephone TBI Northampton 

~~ KIISIGSL.EYS 
SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Eevrything All "Write" Here 



Mr. Kami of the faculty will attend 
the Interfiaiemiiv Conference in New 
York during Thanksgiving week. 



Cbompsoirs Cimclp Calks 

Htart the season with sharp skates. Our work 
on skate sharpening has proved M-ry satisfac- 
tory. VVe will do the work while tOVJ wait. 




THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



no matter what you want to write on or 
about. For the home, the office, or the 
school, we can provide the very best of 
Stationery Supplies in any quantity. 
For your writing-desk we have Letter 
Paper, Envelopes, Pads, Blotters. Pens. 
Ink, Pencils, Rulers, Mucilage, etc. 
Every article is warranted, and our 
prices are as low as you will find any- 
where. We should be glad to receive a 
trial order, which will make you a 
steady customer. 

Amherst Book Store 

C. F. DYER 




£ 



IIANKSGIVINCa Cheer in Haberdashery- -" the fixiiiH." 
Tiling tlmt will put **nei>" in your wtop ami ailii zest to 



the pleasure of the day with relatives and friends. Good taste 
in all of them. Neekwear— most eonspieiious of all you'll wear! 
Kerchiefs in cheer*o patterns und colorings. liloves for the 
finishing touch. Shirts, hose, KNOX HATS. CHBEBIOl 




PAST SEASON SUCCESSFUL 
WITH FIVE WINS OUT OF EIGHT 



tories are Outstanding Triumphs 
of 1922 Little Giants. 



made the Varsiiy last year, anil plavcil 
in nearly all the yames llecaiise of 

his vetch 1 sod aiiiiity he provod aval- 

liable asset to the team this year and is 



tins year he was used as qasrterhssh 
and displayed exceptional ability in 
the raanlB| ol the team. He was kept 
out of two of this season's uanie- 

iherst and New ] apshire Vic- beesoseot an injured collar-bone, hot one of the few men whom we may look to 

his work in the oilier games was well for greBt t b log! the comine, season next] 
worth coinineiidalion. His gradttBtlOfl year, lie prepared for OOllsgS Bt Need- 
will also mean the loss of a ureal asset ham High School, anil now rales as one 
and he has set I high Stssdsrd for of the best tackles in Aggie football, 
those eOBMBg after liim to BQBBl. wit h a year still to uo. 

IfarehnsB, Wilbur H. *%%, ••Willie" p.arrows. Robert A. "•it. 



The Mass. Auuie "Little (iiant.s M tini- 
isbed up a very successful season last 
Saturday at LaBSlBg, UtoblgBB. Al- 
though liuht, lbs team bat been char- 
acterized by speed and precision, and 
has shown the results of able eOBoblog. 
The season started off at Storrs, Con- 
necticut where Ihe Maroon took the 
Natnseg Aggtee Isto camp with the 
score of lH-rl. The following weekend 
Worcester Teeh fell before tliein in Am- 
herst with Ihe short side of a '.io-0 MOTS. 
Then, for the first time in the history of 
several college general ions, the Hay 
Stale eleven won over its rivals from 
the other end of the town. The last. 
heavy New Hampshire gridsters were 
defeated next in a hard-fought speclular 
contest. Hut Hates then came down 
from I.ewiston and threw the team fof 
its first loss, 0-0. Stevens then suffered 
defeat before the Aggies on the latui s 
lirst appearance in "the big city"'. For 
the first time in four years Tults reg- 
istered a win over the (ioreiles and in 
the I i ti ;t I battle the Michigan Aggies 
walked away with the Aggie pigskin 
chasers with a forty-five to nothing 
score. This wan the lirst intersect ional 
game in the history of either institution. 
Aside from I heir lasi appearance the 
Mass. Aggie eleven made a record to be 
proud of, and then, handicapped by 
injuries received in the Tufls game and 
tired by their long trip, they gave their 
best, and were defeated. 



COMMUNICATION 

IS Si'iii.Nii Si., 
BtAMVOBD, Conn., 

Nov. 22. 11122. 
To mi. EniToii of tiik OOMiBSTAB; 

The Mass. Agri. College, 
Auihersl, Mass 

1 noticed in one of the daily papers 

recently thai the students of the Ohio 

"Hobby" Slate have slatted a ceremony which 



came here from Central High School Si came out for football Ibis year for the 
Springlield with no football training, fust time. lie came herefrom Tha>er 
Last Near b« 



Bade a record as an end 

and this year be showed up even better 



Academy, where he starred in baseball, 
but not in football. He has proved an 



His abilhy to break 11 p 1 runs in bis able substitute at <|uatter lo till ".lim- 

teirilory deserves honorable mention, J niie" Heals place and played t tie entile 
and his nevcr-sa> -die spirit proved the came against Michigan. lie will he 
Waterloo of many an opposing back. J with us another year. 



Tin: IMI Vaksitv. 
Grayson. Haymond II. It. "Iliimtf" 
has ably captained the football team 
this year and has regularly held down 
his position as one of the half-backs. 
Because of bis work in the backtield 
last year he was the unquestioned se- 
lection to lead the team and proved 
himself capable of the honor and re- 
sponsibility. He gave a fine exhibition 
of football throughout t lie season and 
everyone felt a deep sympathy for him 
when he was kept out of the Michigan 
game. He played football at Milford 
High School before coming to M. A. C. 
He .8 the fourth member of the tiraysoii 
family to make a name in Agc'ie foot- 
ball. 

Alger, Mason W. '2H. "Mass" came 
to Aggie from the West Bridgewater 
High School with no football record 
whatever. Under the coaching ol 
"Kid"Gore he has become a dependable 
center, and played a clean hard-fought 
game the entire season. Uis woik as 
roving center on the defensive proved 
many a hindrance to the opposing team, 
and his graduation will mean a big 
hole to fill next year. 

Beal, James A. '23. "Jitnmie" re- 
ceived his introduction to football as a 
Senior in the Ahingtoo High School, 
and during his four years at Aggie has 
developed into a valuable man in ihe 
backtield. Near the end of last years 
season he was a regular halfback but 



Be is a clean, hard lighting player and 
his record not only as a football player 
but basketball and baseball as well is 
one to be envied. 

Mohor, Uol.crt DeS. **%, "P.ob" came 
to us lioin Newton High and made the 
Varsity team as left tackle in bis Sopli- 
oini.re year. His record this year shows 
that he has not missed a minute ol 
play in a garni' t he cut ire season, and 
be has been Bailed one of the best in 
his class. He is good-natured, Inn does 
not fail to make use of his weight and 

strength on (I pposing tackle, lie 

has shown himself to be a BghtSI lot 
Old Aggie and his work has been su- 
preme all year. He played rtgb I tackle 
this season. 

Muilgelt, Vernon I). YJ. "Husky" 
prepared for college at Lancaster High 
School. Hooking through hi- record ot 
the past season we litid him playing in 
the majority of Ihe games, and at either 
guard position he showed himself cap 
able of making things waim fot his BB- 
lucky opponent. His weight and agil- 
ity stood him in good stead and he litis 
done his bit for the college. 

Nowers. Donald C fi. "Don" came 
here from Casblaf Academy, ami in his 
four years at Aggie has worked up la 
the ranks until this season found him 
playing steady ball, and doing well. 
As a guard he has made good and will 
leave a hole to be tilled by a good man. 
bargent, Blebnwod H. 'St. "Iliuk" 
was playing football for Thornton 
Academy bofors he entered Aggie. He 
showed up well OS bis Freshman team 
and proved a valuable man on the Var- 
sity last year lb is year however he 
did not get a chance to play in all Ihe 
games, but in many he distinguished 
himself as an end. Playing under a 
handicap ot weight be made 11 p tor it 
in light and speed and made the most of 
his frei|Uetil ohsBi 

TBBey, Malcolm E. 'f.\. "Ivl" is 
another Senior who will be greatly 
missed by graduation. He starred M I 
football player at Dcertield Academy 
before entering M. A. C. and last year 
he did good work SB the Varsity in the 
backueld. He did the punting 



Bike. Edward L '2-1. "Eddie" found 
a chance lo play in several of the games 

Ibis year and in every • proved hiin- 

BSlI aqoal to Ihe responsibility. Next 
\c.ii he will be in line fof I regular 
berth, il be keeps on at the same rale. 
Myrick. Sterling 24. "Pal" earned 
bis chance lo pl;iy in inan\ ol the garni s 
Ibis season and he showed that it was 
no mistake on choosing him to till one 
of the guanl positions, lie will also he 
on the list ncM year as good nialeiial 
and has a bright fntiiic ahead of him. 

Pierce, Arthur 24. "Art" worked 
hard for bis position and his opportu- 
nity came ibtseeasofl when he was used 
as end in several of the games fot a 
few minutes in each one. His speed 
and agility were factors in bis woik 

this year and big things can ' x peeled 

of him next year 

Ferraiili. HcGeOch and Marx, all 
I hit e .Sophomores, proved big assets lo 
Ihe team Ibis year. "Frits" was a 
capable substitute Bt Bad and in every 
way played a line game. He is another 
man fiom West Bridgewater with no 
experience, but a > car under "Kid" has 
worked wonders with him. "Mac" 
proved to be a ground gainer in the 
backtield, and merely repeated his ex- 
cept ional work of last year, by always 
coming out at the tore in line plunges. 
His work in every game this year was 
worthy of much (.raise and two more 
yean should make him a much-talked 
ot man in football circles. "Herb" put 
bis weight and skill to good advan- 
tage in the games I his season and has 
boss a valuable asset to Ihe lirnt siring 
■qOSd. Hike the other Sophomores he 
has two more years before him in college 
football. The above men could not he 
mentioned without saying a word about 
several other members ol the squad, 
who practiced faithfully and proved ex- 
cellent material to scrimmage the Var- 
sity. They took their beatings without 
a murmur and their reward will be the 
knowledge that they whipped into shape 
the Aggie team which made such a 
commendable record in li»22. They are 
Philip DowdsB, Saul Cohen, Clifton 
this (Mies, lied Hollis, and Arthur Roberts. 



might be followed with profit at Aggie. 

Basil Wednesday throughout the year 
campus lite pauses at II a.m. during the 
sounding of laps. Students classwatd 
bound halt in their tracks, bare their 
beads and stand at attention in silent 
tribute not only to their former class 
males and friends but to all soldieis 
dead. 

It would seem that such a ceremony, 
ho simple, yet impressive, would find 
unanimous response on our campus. 
Will some organization lake the lead'.' 
ThkodOBB II Kkimann Th. 



ROISTER DOISTERS JOIN IN 
THEATRE PARTY AT HAMP. 

Every member of the Roister DotetSM 

joined in on Ihe theatre parly which 
was held under their auspices in North- 
ampton last Saturday night. The prr- 
forinanee seen was "The ltivals" by 
Richard Brinsley Sheridan, and played 
by the Jewell Players of Boston. The 
reports, without an exception, com- 
mended this play as an excellent com- 
edy. It will be remembered thai Ihe 
Roister Doisters performed "The 
School for Scandal" by (he same auth- 
or two years ago. 

The parly traveled lo and from Am- 
herst by automobile, and were chap- 
eroned by Mr. and Mrs. Rand. Be- 
tween ihe acts some of the party went 
behind the scenes and met several 
mcmbeiK ol ihe Jcweii Players; and 
allei Ihe play they were all conducted 
in back of the stage by (he stage man- 
ager, to examine the lighting system 
and the stage properties. 

The 100% success of this parlj makes 
it very probable thai more of the same 
kind will be planned as soon as ihe 
opportunity presents itself again (o see 
high class drama so near at band 



; ar ' T 1 ha<J T*mT£ IZ can':!! LANDSCAPE CLUB NOTICE 

play this season until Be was • anno 

from the field in the Michigan game The Landscape ( tub will hold their 

with a fractured leg. His work was „ e xt meeting on Wednesday. Dec. «, at 

commendable the whole season and he seven o'clock. The commit tee have not 

has established a precedent for those a s yet d eci ded upon the speaker lor 

«ho may follow in bis position. this meet ing, hut have several under 



Salman, Kenneth A. '24. "Ken" j consideration. 



80/ OF FRESHMEN PASS 

TH0RND1KE ALGEBRA TEST 

On Nov. M, Professor Machmer gave 
the Freshman class the Thorndike 
Algebra Test. This lest was on work 
done in preparatory school courses, not 
on college algebra. In general, il was 
given to act as a check upon the grades 
which the various instructors in mathe- 
matics were giving. Each student's 
mark for 1 be lirst marking period was 
surprisingly close to his mark in the 
Thorndike Test in practically all cases. 
One hundred seventy-eight students 
look the test. Of t his number, twenty 
per cent were below passing and thirty- 
eight per cent were above eighty-five 
per cent. The showing is considered 
very satisfactory. Most of the students 
who failed to get sixty percent in the 
examination did so because of inade- 
quate preparation in preparatory 
school, not because of poor mental 
ability. It is possible that a general 
intelligence test will be given at some 
future lime. 



'.) 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



Memorial Hall 



Barber Shop Hours: 
Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, Saturday. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 



1 NTERCLASS MEET REVEAL! 



PROMISING TRACK MATERIAL 



l,OW III ■liDI.KS, 1^1 V UtPB 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



ITSA HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



— THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for Brat-elan 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., A mlierst . Mass. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suitt made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Hults Pressed Mlc Military TfcUottaa 



OVER AltAMS' DRUG BTORK 



The Period of Thrift 

The periods of discovery and pioneer- 
inn in the dairy industry arc largely 
past and the rewards of prosperity are 
for those who today faithfully practice 
industry and thrift. 

Ainonu these methods ol thrift and 
economy none are of more vital import- 
ance than the safe, sweet, wholesome 
sanitary cleanliness which the use of 



so consistently provides to an Increasing 
number of successful dallies, creameries 
and cheese lactones. 

This distinctive Wyandotte cleanli- 
ness is the basis of thrift and economy 
in dairy production for it is so unusually 
efficient in its natural cleaning action, 
is so thoroughly yet simply applicable, 
is so uniform in its distinctive quality, 
is so protective of blgb quality milk 
products, is so harmless to the hands 
and to metal equipment, and costs so 
little that every particle to the last grain 
in the barrel bespeaks thrift for the 
dairy industry. 

Indian in 
circle 



Order from 
your supply house. 




in even 

package 



The J. 11. Ford Co.. Sole Manufacturers. 
Wyandotte. Mich. 



Freshman Class Contributes Several 

Firsts to Meet and Wins by 30 

Points. 

The (freshman class safely won the 
inlerclass track meet held last Saturday 
afternoon. They scored OS •"> points 

against 86.8 scored by the Juniors, 

their Dearest eoinpelilois. The Seniors 
tallied IS points and the Sophomores 
were in last place with 10. 

Nelson "24 secured two Hrsli In the 
bardlet, sad Bulffen •Sfl repealed in 
the dash.s. Among lbs other shining 
lights of I be meet were several fresh- 
men, Including Anthony in the mile 

run, Hail in the half mile, Horner, 
Thompson, ami < Soubtg. 

This good showing, especially ol the 

entering class, entirely justilied the 
meet, and KUgUOS well foi :i continu- 
ance id I he good showing and spirit 
made by Capt. Sullivan's men last 

spring. 
The summary i 

.I.WI I IN TllliOW 

Ptrat, stopford, (in ft.) 180.1 ft. 
Second, Jones '20, (16 ft.) 124 2 ft. 
Third, Boss "96, leeratch) 1 1 7 . r, it. 

Discos Thhow 

First, Wright '86, i fl M.fl It. 
Second, Bruaner '24, (scratch) 84.8 ft. 

Third, Whitman '24. (10 ft.) 76 It. 
Shot Pi i 

Pint, Purges '24, (2 ft.) B2.S it. 
Second, Brunaer '24, 'scratch) 60.6 ft, 
Third, Mouradlau '66, '2 ft.) MM) ft. 

I'ol.K V A I 1.1 

First . Homer '2t>, (8 in.) 8 fi. 7.:i in. 
Second. Tucker '20. i!» in.) H II. ti in. 

Third, Wrlgbl '96, (I in ) 7 it. :'. in. 
1Ik.ii .It mi- 

Pint, Tucker '20, (1 in.) .". II. 2 in. 
Second, SnilTeii '20. 'scratch' 4 fl. 11 in 
Third. Thompson '20. (t in.) 4 It. 10 In. 
Bittenger '24, t:5 In.) 4 ft. 10 in. 
lino \n Jump 
Pint, Thompson '20, (l it.) it» ft. 7 in. 

Second, Maet'readv '211. (scratch) 10 f I 

4 in. 
Third, While '20. (1 ft.) 18 tt. 7 in. 

lOO-Yaau i>\-u 

First. BnlSea '96, <■'< yd.) 10 8 sec. 
Second. Thompson '20. (4 yd.) 
Third. I>sac '24, r2 yd 

aOO-YAKD 

First. Siiitlcn '98, 7 yd.) H see. 
Second, Tiedale '2:;. (10 yd.) 
'Third. Cahill '2:.. icnlchj 
440-Vai;i> 

First. Mac' ready '98, (scratch) 60.1 se< 
Second, Coubig '20 134 yd.) 
Third, Ward '96, (24 yd.) 
880-Yaki> 

First. Hail '20. (86 yd.) 2 min. 1.". sec. 
Second, Coubig '20, (45 yd.) 

Third, Mact ready '98, (scratch) 

Mll.K. Kl N 

First, Anthony '2'i, (00 yd.) 5 min. 12 

SIT. 

Second, Harllett '96, (00yd.) 

Third, Hates '2:5. (scratch) 

Heiinebury '20. (60 yd.) 

Two Mil 1 Bun 
First, Bill '24, (96 yd.) 11 min. 90.4 se 
Second, Tanner '98, (scratch) 
'Third, llallelt '98, 80 yd.) 

Iln.ii II 1 i:ih 1 s. 70 Y \1.i1s 
First, Nelson '24, (scratch) ll'iscc. 
Second, Hill '24. (scratch) 
Third, Ballet) '2:'., U hurdle) 
Rhodes '24, (1 hurdle) 



First, Nelson '21, (scratch) 16.8 sic. 

Second, Isaac '24, (scratch/ 
'Third, Hill '24, (scratch I 

Total Ponm 
Class 1096, »'»2.r> 
(lass 1024, 86.6 



with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



Class L998, 
Class 1996, 



18 

10 



DEAN CLARK TELLS WHY 

HE FAVORS FRATERNITIES I 

At chapel last Monday BOruing Dean 
Clark, who spoke at Sunday Chapel, 
gave :t short talk on fraternities, lie 

said that though fraternities have been 

much criticized, not always unjustly, 

nevertheless be believes that they are 

a very necessary part of college life and 

thai they are well worthwhile. The 
best thing about fraternities is that 

t bey give men in college shome; at 

their fraternll] bouses men can share 
not only in I he comforts, but also in 

the responsibilities, ol home life. Fra- 
ternities have been called undemoeiat ic. 
'They are not ; for though they do not 

invite everyone to become members, 

probably nine-lent lis ol those not asked 
do not wish to join a fraternity. No 

fraternity le justified it it does not stand 

lor blgfa scholarship standards and good 

ebaiacter among its members, and if it 

does not stand behind every project lor 

ibe welfare of the college. 

In an issue til I be < Ol 1 I SIAM laal 

spring, an article written by Dean 
(lark for the America* Bey- "Shall 1 

.loin a Fraternity", was published. \- 

iiean of Men at Illinois University, 

where the fraternities are numerous, 
he has bad much experience vithlra- 
ternities and is well lilted to talk on 
t he subject. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Mass 



Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B."T)RURY 

10 Main Street. 



"PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are rioininent Anionic the 
lassOM Makes We I cut lire 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

U a good value fur women who want Hie best 

then is la s seamless stoefctnc that jet 

will lit tlie ankles ttimb. 



INDUSTRIAL RECONSTRUCTION 
THEME IN MR. HANNA'S CLASS 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Excellent Training and Chance for 
Discussion. 

Mi. Banna's elaas io Christianity and 
Industrial Beeoustruction met last 
'Tuesday evening to discus* "Changes 
in the Present Ek omlc Order." 

The elaas will hold two more meet- 
ings this term on Thursday evening 
Dec. 7 and 14 in French Hall at 7 o'clock. 
At the last nieeiiii"; itev. Henry l\cs ol 
the Unity Church vv 1 ' ' present the em- 
ployer's side of lb* labor queatlon. 

These classes are planned to continue 
next winter and olfer an unusual oppor- 
tunity to keep in touch with some of 
1 he mosi vital problems of the day. 

THIRTY-FIVE TRY OUT FOR 
TWO-YEAR DRAMATIC CLUB 

Tuesday. Nov. al, in the Memorial 
Building, Professor Patterson held try- 
outs lor members <>l the Two-Year Dru* 
malic Club. 'These tty-oiiis were for 
no especial play, but merely to see 
what the members could do and what 
type ol parts they would be titled lor. 
The short plays which they will present 
(i prior to the Commencement play will 
be chosen with regard to what members 
are lilted lot. In all, about 86 tried 
out — tfl men and 8 women 



FLORICULTURE CLUB MEETING ; = 



The Floriculture Club held an inter 
' ' estine meeting in French Hall on Tuea- 
I day evening, Nov, 21. Bolnod Sogers 

'of the Horticulture Department spoke 

toiiieclub on French Gardens, lllus- 

' trating his lecture with post card slide-. 
The next meeting of the club is 
planned for the early part of December, 

1 and the date will be announced soon. 

1 



NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



After Every 
Meal 




The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



When on the campus, drop in and see our line of Loose-leaf Note Books. 

Also Typewriters for Sale or Rent. 



DEAN MARK AT CHAPEL 

Continued from pago 1 



GOOD COMPETITION FOR NO. 
DAKOTA DEBATE JAN. 8 

The Varsity Debating Team Will de- but the ability to think and think 
bate with the North Dakota \y,riciili ur- ''early. 'The personality of the pio- 

al College team hare on the evening ol fessorwao teaches tbeae courses thai 

January M, lOgg, The subject lor t lis- make us think bardolleo instills into 

cussion is, Bssolved : "That the United asahlgher and nobler appreciation of 
States Enact into Law the Towner-Ster- 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



ling Education Hill."' This bill is now 
before Congress tor consideration, so 

that the topic is alive with current 
interest . 

At (he try. nits held last Thursday 
after Assembly I he following men weie 
chosen from the seven com pel It ol s I o 

compete further for the two speaking 

positions on the team: Cain/uc, '2:1. 

Batal, 15, Ciiiernian, 'S6, and Ward, '86. 

'These men arc till vclciaiis from last 

year's Triangular debate and pr ise 

to give the Dakota team sonic still op- 
position. 'The judges wire also very 
much pleased wit h t he show inji of t he 

other competitors ami regard them as 
excellent material for the Triangular 
debate next spriiiL'. when eight men are 
needed for the two teams. 



character, refinement and those ideals 
that mark the truly college bred man. 

"ll you do not go out Into lite better 
men with I mind trained Io think deal 
ly and an appreciation <>f lie's ideals, 
you arc not getting what is worth while 
from college." 



ABBEY NOTES 

Preceding a talk on "Germaaj ami 

the World War" given ai the Jones 

Library last Sunday. T.lcanoi Hat ctnan, 
Dorothy Turner and Eunice Austin 

gave several musical selections. 

The t;irls' ltille flub held its liisl 
meetinc; last Wednesday aliernoon at 
the Abbey. About fifteen girls attended 
the meeting and learned from ( aptain 

Brady the fust principles of shooting. 

It is hoped that two meetings may be 
held each week, one at the same time 
as last week's, the other al a time 
which will be most satisfactory to the 
majority ol those who wish to be mem- 
bers but whose present schedules will 
not permit them to be. 'The latter part 
of Friday afternoon has been thought 
of as best for the majority. 
The third Faceting o! the Qirl Scout 

Training Class was held Nov. 21 al 

Stock bridge Hall. 'The usual program 

was carried out. Some time in Decem- 
ber Miss Trolt will give t lie Tenderfoot 
Test to all those girls who are ready foi 
it. 
Sunday afternoon several members 

of the.s.c.s. hiked to Orient Springs. 



ALUMNI 

'72. Mr. and Mrs. .lohnaihan f 

Bancroft celebrated ibelr Gulden Wed- 
ding in September LOSS. 

'OS. Dr. H. If, .lenoisoii, who has 
recently received the degree ol Pb.D. 
from Washington University, has ac- 
cepted the position as Associate Pro- 
feasor of Botany at the University of 
Tennessee, after having completed ll 
years service al the Montana state 
College. Boaeman, Mont . 

'17. B. B. Selkregg, having resigned 
from the is. Bureau of Entomology, 
is now a tloiisi in business with bis 
father. 

'1M.-K. A. Carlson. Cornell I'h. I). '22, 
is now Assistant Professor of Soil Tech 
oology at the University of California, 

Davis, Calif 

" It*. — A i the September directors' 
meeting of the Mutual Orange Watrlb 

ulois, Mr. A. L. Chandler, formerly 
with the Amerii an agricultural Chem- 
ical Co., was selected io take charge of 
the fertiliser work oi the association. 

lit. - Harold Poole's Dun r Acad- 
emy eleven beat Plnkerton Academy in 
theft annual contest for the first time 
in mm tai j eai s. 
'IB. -Edward A. White writes: "Open 

House for all M. A. C. men stopping 
in Providence. # 

'20.- Alfred A. CloUgfa dropped into 
tbe A! Di office and repotted that he 

has jnsl staited with the Portland 
Cement Association a-- Held engineer on 

(arm promotional woik In Massacliu- 
sells. Maine and New Hampshire. 

'2l.-Slarr K'.og'l Newbury port High 
team beat I heir Salem rivals recently 
for the Brat lime staee Itlfl and the 



Ass.m i.tti Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. (\ Athletic Association, 

Ai ademic Activitie 

The Collier Senate, 

Baseball Assot iation, 
Football Assoi iation, 
Track Assoc iation, 
The Collegian, 

I loi key Assoi iat ion, 

Basketball Assot iation, 

Koistet Doistets, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical ' liths. 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, 

M. A.. ( ( 'in istiau Association, 

Public Speaking and Debating, 



They left the Abbey early in the after- 

noon, cooked their supper at the Orient. I third time in history. 

and returned to the Abbey at six-thirty. \ '^ 

—ii Authorities at Harvard and Tufts 

AN. HUS. CLUB HOLDS FIRST nradieal schools have both asked Mayor 
MEETING OF SEASON NOV. 21 < " 7l - ««*" <° ^" c *f or °t he 

nance which would provide IOI tin 
The Animal Husbandry Club met Nov. sh . UJI ,„ o) ,|ie etty's excess telines and 

II in Stockbrldge Hall. This was their ( . aili|1( ~ between the two scl !-. tor 

first meeting of tbe season, Selby Pad- v ' jv ;_,,,.,,„„ purposes. Each feels that 

dock, Two-year '24. was elected the , , H , cl| ,,,., s | H)l ,bl have no more ri-;ht to 
'Two-year member of the Executive tbegln| y j t>gB aB< j cata than tbemaelvea 

Committee. A list of speakers that the ^ f . |„-lieve ihat money can be 

club hopes to gel for the coming year T _^ ;i , both lustitntions by having 



c-«« — 



was discussed. Allan Brewer, Gardner 

Heath, and Vernon Budget I gave short 

talks on their experiences while they 
were on the stock judging trip to si. 
Paul. 

AGRONOMY NOTE 

Prof. Hans G'.onime of the Soils Dept, 
of the Agricultural College of Norway 
is inspecting the equipment and 
methods of teaching at M. A. C. He is 
making a tonr of the most important 
Agricultural Colleges in the country. 



ucfa an ordnance. 



On account ol the aim. .y ami s cau-ed 

by ibeplaylogof musical instruments 
during recitation hours and late at 
sight, the faculty at Brown University 

D gTe decreed that four ol the dormi- 
tories refrain from the use of musical 

Instruments at the staid hours ol the 

day and that the occupants ol all the 
dorms discontinue their impromptu 
Busicales alter HI I'. M. 



TstspSens 

Richard Mellcn, As.s't Sec. 175 J 

Richard ftiellen, llaoagtr 175 J 

C. s. Hitks, General Mgr., 403-M 

Frank I'. Kami, Manager '3° K 

Roget 1». Fliend, President 720 

Perry ('.. Hartlett, afanagei S325 

|olin M. Whittier, afanagei 170 

< 'li.it les VV. Steele, Manager 8325 
Irving W. Slade, Editor 170 

Kinest T. Putnam, lfanaget K330 
Philip B. Dowden, Manager H336 
(lustav Undakog, Manager 530 

Treacott T. Abele, Kditor B6i W 
Thomas I.. Snow, Managei 720 

Owen K. Kolsoin, M 1 lagei 83' 4 
Richard B. Smith, Manager 8314 
Frederick B. Cook, President 8330 
Alexander S.nnlow. Manager 



Saving of 2b% to 40* on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
inn. our store and ask lis to show you whatever you may be 
interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 
2=, to ,|0 per Vent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because wc are doing business on this 
basis. T. S. Rubbers $i .25 per pair. 

V\ «■ also do high grade 

SHOE EEPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1 .90 

Men's h; ill" soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1-7° 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 cts per pair. 

We will sew soles if yciir shoes are Goodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



I 









■ 



if 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 29, 1922. 



HOME FOR THANKSGIVING 

And you naturally want to look your best. There is something you need to brighten up your appearance a 
hat, scarf, tie, hose-will all help. If you've been putting off that winter overcoat, now is the time to get it. 

And a pleasant vacation to everyone. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



LARGE GATHERING ATTENDS 
WASHINGTON ALUMNI DINNER 



President Butterfield, Haskell, Gil- 
bert and Willard Among Speak- 
ers. New Officers Elected for 
Coming Year. 

Tin* largest RAlherillfl of Massachu- 
setts Aggie followers ever held south ol 
New fork City K«>k place ll Washing- 
ton, 1). C.,<MI Wednesday evening, Nov. 
22, witli 40 graduates or members 
Of the College siatV and their wives 
present at a dinner at the Crace Dodge 
Hotel. 

Due to the meetings of the Land 
(Irani Colleges being held in Washing- 
ton during the week, an exceptionally 



and Mrs. Hysh.p; II. .1. Maker '11 ; 
II. A. Turner '12: Dr. .1. f, Martin '12; 
II. ('. lirewer 'It, and Mis. I'.tewcr; 
i. 8. Thurston '14; II. .J. < lay 11. anil 
Mrs. (lay; F. W. Marsh '16; F. .1. Dinks 
'1*: K. A. St. Cenrge '!!»; V. A. Dickin- 



hoi), 'In, and Mrs. Dickinson; W. 
Miles, e\-20; D. P. Smith '22: W 
Welles: .1. D. Willanl. 



I! 

s. 



INTERCOLLEGIATES 

New rules are being drawn up at Am- 
herst College lor future Sabrina opeia- 
lions. Sabrina is the statue which is 

annually battled for by the odd ami 

even numbered clas-es. and a commit- 
tee has heen appointed to draw up 
rules so that the element of chain e will 
enter mole into I he capture or retention 
large'numher were ' present "from New of I he ( loddess, reducing expenses and 
England. Among these were President \ making the general atmosphere sur- 
Hutterlield, Commissioner of Agricul- ro.nling Sab. inal activities more spoits- 
luretiilherl, Director llaskelhd the Kx- manlike. The object ot the rules Hi to 
periment Station, ami Director Willard, 
all of whom spoke briefly. 

President Bullertield told of his en- 
thusiastic reception at Sapporo and of 
the high veneration in which memories 
of the M. A. C. founders were held 
The pressing need for a new Library 
Ituilding, a combined Drill Hall and 
Gymnasium, and increased dormitory 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks lor itself. 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 
at Reasonable PrlSSS. 
Informal* a Specialty 

II so. preeped st.. a ■bant, Mhbs. 

Tel. SBB-M 



S. S. HYDE 

<i Pleasant Street (ui> one flight . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Mg Men Alarm (locks anil, itliei Keliable Makes 



vive a tradition unique at Amherst. 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing, Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Ittiy your pressinit ticket from It . Oain/.tie '•.':« 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

a i man Rxtae*. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Home Bros- Wecfcwoi- 

Oilier vein ne\' Suit oi (ncieoat here now. 
lieM ICleCtlOM of Woolens in the latest pat 

terns always o* aaad. The also quality of obi 
work is apparent oa tear] fameata lo us! 



Tailor and Haberdasher. 

11 Amity St. Next to Western I Hion Tel. I > tl i • • 



Vale's baehetbell tebedule, as just 

announced, contains just half as many 
games as last year. They are playing 

18 games, beginning late In I be season 

with the C Diversity of Buffalo, and 



i . v in nasi u in . iiuu iiitiriMnu ..«.. ... ..».. j 

. ... . .,., „„„„;,„ em iik March 17 with the second gam« 

facilities, was stressed. I lie necessity, ■ 



of emphasizing scholarship in the cm- 



wit h Harvard at Boston. The other 



, I contests mi their schedule are With the 

rtculum was brought out graphically bj 

, I'nivetsilv ol Koehestcr.t lescent A. A., 

■bOVlag the increasing percent am' ot * ' 

.. „ Trinity. Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, 

Freshmen thinking out in recent years. ".* " , ' ,. ,, ,, . 

,,....,..... , ,t.„o ,, Union, Columbia, I . •>! P., Harvard, 

Mr. Haskell told hrienv <>f the old ' 

i •. i» i) i i». i !.. i .... i»r Princeton, end Wesleynn 
otiard. —Dr. Brooks, Dr. Lindsey, Dr. 

Fernald, Professor Ostrander and Pro 



lessor Hashrouck. Mr. (iilbert suggested 
the need of belter College publications, 



Croinid was recently l.roken at Will- 
iams for a new freshman dormitory, 



The Largest and Best Assortment 

—OK — 

College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICKS 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

1X1 'OKI-OKA TK.Ii 

nS-flTfl High St., Holyoke 

Tel. WB2 WB3 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL. 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



giving It M his opinion that neither the which it is hoped will be completed 

Oi.i.KuiAS nor the Alumni Bulletin next fall. The bnlldlag is I mplete 

were satisfactory at present and should the Chapin and Williams Halls Quad- 



perhaps be coinhined. 

A glance into the early history of 
Annie was broUgbl by Mr. Willard, who 



raugle, as now proposed, and involves 
the destruction of four tennis courts. 
There will he mote smaller and more 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



IN 



LEE 



Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



told how inemhers of the Amherst Col-laJaglc rooms, so that the cheapest pee- 
lege faculty had subserihed $25,000 to- sible rooms may he offered to those 



wards the starting of the new college. 
Ue spoke also of adapting the policy of 
the college to meet the changing needs 



Frosh who are of modest means. Total 
construction expenses of I he cdilice are 
estimated at 860,000, and the material! 



of the Stale by increasing the extension used ate to In- dark red brick, laid up 
activities. Billings '05, Monahan *(M), ,,, Flemish bond, with trimming! of 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



Plngree '99, Smith '22, and Bowman Ml, 
also spoke briefly. 

During the evening the follwing offi- 
cers were elected for the coming year: 
President, Dr. E. A. Back 04: Viee- 
l'resident, Charles A. Bowman "HI ; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, H. 0. Brewer '13, 
Choragus, C. M. Walker W. F. J. 
Binks '18, was appointed club reporter 
to work with the secretary. 

Those present included President 
Kenyon L, Butterfield ; Charles A. Bow- 
man '81, and Mrs. Bowman; Dr. E. W. 
Allen 85. and Mrs. Allen; Dr. E. U. 
Flint '87; B. U. Hart well '89; F. S. 
Cooley'!>2: G. A. Billing! '95; M. H. 
I'ingree '99; Dr. W. A. Hooker '99: C. 
M. Walker '99, and Mrs. Walker; A. C. 
Monahan '00, and Mrs. Monahan; Prof. 
W. D. Hurd, Mrs. Hurd and Miss Bax- 
ter; W. H. ileal; II. L. Knight '02 and 
Mrs. Knight ; W. W. Gilbert '04; S. 11. 
Haskell'04; Dr. E. A. Back '04, and 
Mrs. Back; J. W. Wellington '08, and 
Mrs. Wellington; J. A. Hyslop '09, 



Indiana limestone. 



If it were not for a new heating sys- 
tem which has heen installed In the 
power house, Smith Colleg! might 
have been forced to close its doors this 
winter. But as it is aboul Bft,000 bar- 
rels of oil have heen ordered, which is 
the amount to he used this fall instead 
of coal. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

St. 10 by mall. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



Dartmouth's famous shade trees are 
attfferlDg from a serious infection 
which is unknown to leading tree 
experts of the country, but which re- 
sembles ncc'.ria. a disease fatal to 
certain trees. Dr. C E. Stone, one of 
the foremost tree pathologists of the 
country, has been called into consulta- 
tion and says that the trees may be 
saved by careful treatment, but that 
the large elm in front of the Adminis- 
tration building must be cut down 
within a short time. Dartmouth is 
proud of its beautifully shaded campus, 
and is doing everything possible to save 
tbe trees. 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



K 



hoe 



tore 



Old Deer-field Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma** 



C&rpfrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No r, Cook Piece, Amhertt, Ma»» 





Vol. XXXIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, December 13, 1922. 



No. 10 



SWISS YODLERS ENTERTAIN hatfield concert second 
PACKED AUDITORIUM DEC. 8 0F SEAS0N F0R MUS CLUBS 



Variety, Novelty and Quality Make 

This Social Union Best 

This Year. 

The performance of "Daddy'" Gro- 

hecker ami his Swiss Vodlers OS Friday 
evening, Dec. n. constituted the second 
of this season's Social Union entertain- 
ments which met with heartiest ap- 
proval from the audience. 

"Daddy ' w;'s assisted by his 

daughter, Mrs. Bella hen/., his grand, 
daughter, Miss Adrienne I.enz. Mr. .lack 
•lost, who accompanied with a coiitra- 

guitaraad Mr. Constant ine vYunderle, 

who accompanied all selection! of the 

quintette en a zither. All were attired 
in national costume, which combined 
with their spoiitaniety and perfect nat- 
uralness of manner, instilled into the 
audience a keen appreciation ami sym- 
pathy with the theme of each selection 

Continued on pare 2 



FRUIT JUDGING TEAM MAKES 
FOURTH PLACE AT PENN STATE 



Sears Places Fourth in Individual. 

Competition Against Best Teams 
of East. 

The Fruit Judging Team made a wry 
creditable showing in the recent contest 

Si eastern COllegCf held at IVim. Male 

< ollege on Dec. 0. The exact placing 

"l the team was fourth, hut with enly 

28 of a point difference between the 

-' com! and fourth places, the outcome 
was about as close a* it could be. Thl 
sil colleges competing were the leading 
pomology institutions of the hast, and 

contest was indeed a hard one. It 
is interesting to note that New Jersey 
and Ohio, who have for several years 

ced among the first , were on the 
\ery end. 

>ears made the best individual show- 
ing for Mass. by pacing fourth, with a 

raofM.80. (.onion, with 88.07, and 
Wendell, with *:$.(M). were 11th and IStfa 
■ Bpectively. 

The men, wit h l'rof. Drain who ac- 
companied them, were very well enter- 
tained while at the college, especially 
bj Prof, Meruit and Mr. Knapp. both 
M. A. h. men and teaching at that insti- 
tution. A <5U-inile auto drive and a 
general inspection of the 8,000-acre 
csmpui were among the most Interest- 
ing parte Ot the trip. Socially the trip 
a big success, and t lie term de- 
serves credit for its good showing 
i usi the sis best teams of the East. 
I cam standings were as follows: 



Concert Under Auspices of Men's Club. 
Twenty-two Men with Man- 
agers Enjoy Trip. 

On Wednesday. Dec. <i, the combined 

musical dubs ( ,t the college presented 

their second conccll of the season in 

the neighboring village of Bat field. 

The concert was held under t he aus- 
pices of t he Men's Club of the town and 
the occasion was Ladies' Night. 

The clubs left Memorial Hall at .v::u 

in special automobiles furnished by the 
Hatfield club and arrived at llatlield 
in time to enjoy the the townspeople in 

supper which was held In I be Congre- 
gational chinch. The concert started 
at eight o'clock. The audience v\as an 
appreciative one. calling fox encores 

time and again. They especially en- 
joyed the song "Old King t'ole.'and 

Weat herwax's little act oi pantonine. 
The program was : 

lite I nc lc Moon 

Bella Napoll 

I. lee I lull 

fni'ii gwbf ate In 

I cti.ni Iiiiiii Si hilliert 
I >i chest ni 

< l.o inet Solo 

U. I). Fuller 
Ban i" I iiiets 

Towns anil Kurd 

Tetneeo 

iii.i p.iac k Son 

{Has 0Mb 

Bborl Sketches lis II. K. \\ eat lii't ».i \ 

Qsartet 

■endow, Blade, Basts ami Braderteb. 

I Three Hies 

b \\ .IV l>"« ll N "Intel oi t he «oi n I lelil 

E A M.ii'l W itti I Muster 

i ihi Kitiu' Cole 
\ oaag Loebtavai 

l.leel lull 
Baj Mite's Loyal Suns 

The club now consists of the follow- 
ing men : 
First Tenor: D. 15. Alexander, L I'. 

Continued on page 3 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE OF 
FOURTEEN GAMES ANNOUNCED 



West Virginia, 


ill 


Maryland, 


81.48% 


Pennsylvania, 


Xl.44% 


Massachusetts, 


87.889 


New Jersey, 


88.38 


1 >hio. 


81.18% 



Including Harvard, Dartmouth and 

Wesleyan. Middlehury here in 

First Game January 6. 

The v.itsiu basketball squad Is prac- 
ticing three days a week regularly now 
with practice scrimmages and are mak- 
ing good progress, No OUi has been 
made n t be squad .'is yet. and none will 
be made till alter Christmas. Several 
ol the men liom last year's Freshman 
and class teams are doing well and will 

be given a chance to show what the] 

can do before the season Is ovet. 

The tentative line-up at present con- 
sists of llariows and Ferranti, for- 
wards : Captain Marshman. center: and 
I Male and hike. guards. This is not tinal. 
as "Fit" T umey. who is around on 
Continued on pas* 8 



PRES. MURLIN OF B. U. TELLS 
OF ROOSEVELT IN ASSEMBLY 



"Live a Decent Life, and Meet Your 

Work Fairly and Squarely, if 

You Would Succeed." 

At assembly, Dec 7, President Lem- 
ael ll. Hnrlln of hoston Unlveanlty 

gave an address in which he eoni mended 
to us a life regulated in accordance 
with the maxims ol that noblest and 
ideal typeol A merican, Theodore hoose- 

Vcll. 

"The success of hoose vel l's lite was 
not due alone to cither the stuidy and 
rgetle character ol Ins parents or any 

financial opportunities that lay before 

him, but solely to his determination to 
Continued on page 7 

HOCKEY TEAM TO HAVE STIFF 
OPPOSITION THIS WINTER 



Lack of Conditions, also of Previous 

Experience, being Overcome by 

Hard Work. Prospects Good. 

vvith Iwo dayi on lbs lee Coach Col- 
lins has had an excellent chance to size 
up tbe material which has thus fat 
turned out for Hockey practice. Al- 
though the men lack < ditlon, con- 
stant hard work is overcoming this 
handicap and the outlook for the sea- 
son is optimistic. Another handicap 
with which Coach Collins is burdened 
is that many of the men coming out 
this year have very little if any previous 
training, hut diligence and ability will 
prove Strong factors in t lie whipping 
of i bene men into shape. 

Arrangements are being made now 
loi practice every day in I lie hoston 
Arena from Dec. M to .Ian. 1. This 
will give the men tin excellent opportu- 
nity to get together on good ice ami 

nndei favorable conditions, and will 

serve to keep them in condition. Also 

at the present time the management is 

trying to arrange a game with the 
Springfield Hockey Club for the early 
part of January to test the strength of 
t he team. 

A good showing ol Freshmen have 
turned out for their team and with a 
little coaching they will make excellent 
material for the Varsity to scrimmage. 

The tentative schedule is as follows: 

Jan. 17, Williams at Williainstowii. 
80, Amherst at M. A. < . 
88, American Osteopathy e( M.A.C. 

:>»•.. Hamilton at Clinton, N. V. 
27. Cornell at Ithaca, N. V. 
Feb. B. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

B, Beneeelaar P. I. at Troy, V. Y. 

10, Army at West 1'oint. 
14. Vale at New Haven. 

Games art pending with Maatachu- 

setts Institute of Technology, Itostos 
University and Harvard. This is a 
sit i IT schedule but with the promise of a 
winning team the prospects are all that 
can he desired. 



FOOTBALL CONFERENCE 
MUST MEET OUR STANDARDS 



Prof. Hicks Says Eligibility Code 

Must Equal That in Effect 

Here for 10 Years. 

Curry K. Hicks, general manager of 
athletics at M. A. ('., lias issued the 

statement clarifying the stand of t lie 

college in relation to the part which M. 
A. C. will play in the proposed conlct 
euce of New England stale institutions. 
The statement reads : "At an Informal 
meeting of delegates of the various state 
colleges of New (England held at P.osloli 
Nov. M, possibilities of burning a con- 
lct enee were discussed . 8 point which 
seemed to be ag I eeable to I he assembled 
delegates has been submitted to I he 

athletic < mittec of M.A.C., and a 

subcommittee lias been appointed to 
study the situai ion carelully. 

"Any final action will have to be 
taken by the president of the college 
in conference with the executives of the 
Other flee institutions concerned, how- 
ever. The standard of eligibility ol 
rules undei discussion has been in exist- 
ence at M. A. c. for 1(1 years, it is Un- 
feeling of our I imittee that if such a 

Conference would result in the standard- 
ization of eligibility rules of stale insti- 
tutions on a basis at least as high as at 
I he present one at M. A. C, then the 
coiifeteuee is highly desirable. 

"There is, however, considerable 
queetioa by our committee as to the 
desirability of entering any agreement 
necessitating the devotion of ihc major 
part of our at hletic schedules to compe- 
lition with the other state institutions. 
This is due in part to the geographical 
location of M. A. C. and our relation 
with institutions outside the group 
whleh have been in existence many 
years. 

"The whole question as far as M.A.C. 
is concerned will be definitely settled 
by the president of the college in the 
near future, but ii goes without saying 
that M. A. C. will not enter any conlct 
encc unless eligibility rules adopted 
would have at least as high a standard 
as is now and has been in operation 
here for the past decade." 



THE ANNUAL 

BOSTON ALUMNI CONCERT 

AND DANCE 

of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Musical Clubs 

Mill lie tielil at the 

COPLEY PLAZA 

Friday Evening, Dec. 29, 1922 

at 8 o'clock 

Meet old friends, talk over old times. 
Informal. 



73 X 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 13, 1922. 



PROF. HICKS TO CONDUCT 

WEEKLY HIKES FOR ALL 



Connecticut Valley Near Amherst 

to be Tramped Over by Students 

Every Saturday. 

At ehapel Friday morning, Piof. 
Mirks announced that he would son- 
duel a hike up Mount Toliy Saturday, 
Dee. !». Tlmse desiring to lake it were 
to n«i by train to Mount Toby Station 
and from there start up lbs mountain, 
where they would follow several trails 
over the college property. Everyone In 

t tie party was to briiin his own 1 nnch 
and Prof. Ilieks promised to provide 

coffee enough for all. 

Saturday 1 ! hike was t he lirst of severs I 

to be held I h is season ; it was the only 
OSe Of this term. Hikes will be con- 
ducted throughout the winter, only the 
severest weather preventing them. 
There are several reasons for these 
bikes. First. Prof, links said to give 
some exercise to those men who do not 

goout tor team alhletlea and who conse- 
quently need it. Second, he wishes (0 
show the men who do go OUt for team 

athletics that there is inn In hiking. 

When these men are graduated, they 

will probably not be able ti» play on 
teams — they will not lie able to bring 

together eleven or nine or live men as 
the case may be or t hey may have no 

place for such leams to play. Hiking 

is a sport t hey should learn to enjoy for 
it is a universal form of exercise. 



WEBSTER'S STODIO 

Nash Block 

Good work apeakg for itself. 
MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASS1N 

•ELECT CATERING 
at Reasonable Prieee. 
Informal* m Specially 

It SO. Prosper! St.. VinliiTst. Mass 

Tel. aee-M 



IT'SA HAPPY FEELING , ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 



SWISS YODLERS 

Continued from page 1 
and thus made poaaible the complete 

success Of lh«' occasion. 

in an address of Introduction it the 
opening of the performance. Daddy told 
something <d the blatory of Switzerland, 

bo« William Tell and his followers 
threw Off the Austrian yoke of op- 
p resion. The Voillers are dwellers la 
the Swiss Alps, the land of the world 
renowned Swiss cheese, "La KroniiUje !" 

as Daddy ealled it. The small white 
Bowers, "Edelwelea", with wkleh ao 

much rif i heir embroidery is decorated, 

is ahoui the only flower growing high 

1 1 1 . in the AI|'S, and is used hy the 
Swiss when he wishes to present a token 
Of his deepest love. The yodllog of 

these people hi an art comprising a 

national Institution common all over 
Europe. Few, however, can yodle. and 
tbeM lew must begin practice In child- 
hood. 

"Daddy"' then gave .m Illustration of 

a yodllng cry used hy the Alpine lover 

to greet his love on another mountain 

side. This was answered from behind 

the stage, lie then rang his cherished 
U pi tie oow bell t<» oall his performere. 
after an opening eboine, Constantino 
t^ave a solo on his ts-strlnged sitber, 

entitled "An Evening on Mountain 

i.ake <;«•. ii va." the masterly rendering 

Of Which brought forth thunderous ap- 

applauae. The quartette then sang 

"The New horn Dav" and "Sanlis 
Mountain March Bong." .lack, who is 
from the highlands, next uave a solo 
entitled, "My dear old Switzerland 
across I he Sea. " in which his high yod- 

ling notes touched the ethereal realm 

of the Soprano. Alter the singing of 
"Amilal, You are my .loy" in unison . 
Adrienne sang a few French •'juvenile" 
sonys and also rendered two short 
■elections, in Which she showed a skill 
in the art of elocution. The lirsl part 

of the program concluded hy a singing 

of folk BOOgS interspersed with a lew 
fireside vaudeville stunts. 

The second half was opened with a. 
series ol stliog-inetrumentnl selections 

bj Conetantine and .lack, a lallaby, 
the "Dreaming of a >wiss Bbepherd* 

. ami a i Hy of military piece-. 

Soiisa's March, Yankee Doodle, etc. 
Jack then rendered Kmmet's ''Sleep 

Bab; sleep" ami a series of bumoreus 

selectloaa. Another series of recitations 

bj Adrienne was followed hy an Italian 

I character representation hy Delia, hot b 

jot whom were applauded and encored 
several times. 

The program closed bj a singing in 

unison of "I aiu the Happiest Yodler 
under the Sun" or as Daddy preferred 
to translate it in the American ver- 
nacular, "I should worry." 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 



Wednesday, Thurs- 
day. Friday and 
Saturday. 

Dec. 13. 14. 15 and 16 

Dec. 18. 19 and 20 



Harold Lloyd in "Grandma's Boy" 

*'Th« Beggar Maid." a Truait Picture. 

Ncwi Weekly Topic* of the Day Aeiop'e Fahle 

restore Picture, M If You Believe It. If. So." with Thee. Meigaan 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, Decei 



1922. 



The Yule Log is Already on the Hearth 

A few fleeting days and Christmas comes bounding down the chimney — 
That list of yours! Is every uaiue checked off? If not, how about 

Heavy Brushed Wool Mufflers, Silk and Wool Hosiery, Woven and 

Corded Madras Shirts, Ties of Finest Silk and Silk and Wool, 

Knit Wool Gloves, Imported Flannel Profile Shirts, 

Sheepskin Coats, Four-buckle Overshoes ? 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block 

The House of Kuffenkeimer flood Clothes 



BEFORE SHARPENING YOUR SKATES 

SHARPEN YOUR WITS 

By Beading 

THE HOCKEY NEWS 

In The 

Boston Evening transcript 

Keep Abreast of the Times on the ICE l)OIN(JS of 
COLLEGE AND CLUB Teams. 

An Exhilartin« SPORT to Watch 
and Read About This Winter. 

An Opinio* a/Oneo/la* Leading Nne England School* Regarding 

Thi' TrunMcript 

••Of coins.- vou dott'l waul to he a light-weight. All right, then start right 
here at school and form jrour opinions hy rending the papers. 1 hat is why 

the school snl.scril.es to the Transcript, as well as other periodicals ol m- 

telllgenee, for even house."- From The Milton Orange «"</ '<•'"-. 



Appropriate for Christmas 

Banners, Pillow-tops, Table Runners for college or fraternity, Fountain Pens, Conklin Pencils, 
W. D. C. Pipes, Standard Brands of Cigarettes in Christmas cartons. 

YE AGGIE INN, By the Campus Entrance. 



C. L. CHURCH 75 WINS 

HILL BOTANY PRIZE 



George Shumway Gets Second Prize 
and Several Have Honorable 
Mention. 
The awards tor the Hill botany pi 
were made at chapel last Friday morn- 
ing. George L. church '95 of Dorcbes 



ter won tirst prise and tieorue Shnni 
way '•!■> of Monson won second. Brad- 
ford Armstrong '26, Howard Norwood 

'94, and George Stone '16 received boo- 
orable mentioned. The prise-winning 
herbariums wen- on exhibition at (lark 

Hall over the «••> k end. 
The tils! prize is twenty dollars, and 

the second fifteen dollars. The prises 
will he awarded at Commencement, 
June 1988. 



E. M. BOLLES 



College shoes are our specialty, We have outfitted PARTICULAR 
College Men for over 25 years. Our stock has never been more 
complete than at the present time. Our service is of the best. 

When we sell a pair of shoes we FIT them, and stand back of them. 
Before going home for Christmas step in and look over our line. 
We believe we have just what you want regardless of your taste. 

Stetson Shoes 

More by the pair — less by the year. 



E. M. BOLLES 



THERE ARE NO FINER 

Overcoats 

than those tailored for us by Hart Schaffner & Marx. 

Don't make the mistake of buying your coat before you see 

these. 



Sheep-lined Coats, 
Mackinaw Shirts at 



$10.00 to $33.50 
$5.00 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



For Christmas! 



A DUNHILL PIPE or TOBACCO POUCH 

makes a tine present. 



Candy in Pleasing Boxes 

mailed anywhere at the 
time you say. 



Talk It Over At Home 



A Christmas Vacation Suggestion To Seniors 



THIS is your last year in college. This is your 
last Christmas vacation. 
Your career after grnrluation is a question 
that you will want to talk over with the folks 
at home. They will he even more interested than 
you are. Now is the time to do it. 

The John Hancock has in its field organization 
producers who began as life insurance men immedi- 
ately after graduation and have made a conspicuous 
success of it. 

Why waste time trying out something else which 
looks 'just as good" and then come into the life 
insurance work to compete with the man who got 
into the game from the start? 

Talk it over at home and remember that you can 
get information and helpful advice by addressing 

ARency Department 




Life Insurance Company 

of Boston. Massachusetts 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Continued from p»ce 1 

cniiriifs from a football injury, will be 

in the running alter Clirisinias tor bis 

regular bertn at forward. The four 

Int. 1 men.Maislniian, Hale, Tiiniev ami 

Hike make a strong nucleus on which 

to build a tail team. Harrows ami IVr- 

rantl an" good Boor men, ami both have 
an accurate ■hooting sye. 'liny are 

particularly good a! shooting fouls, 

which auguret well fortbesuoeessol the 

team. "Hank" (o.w.ly an. I "Al" Smith 

are no longer with lbs squad aed their 

loss is keenly fell. However, practice 

is iioinn along smoothly with the ma- 
terial on band. The men will f if* Up 

the last three days of their vacation 
and conic hack to yet into good shape 

toga against Middlebnry In tbe flrel 

game of tbeeeaaon, oeBsturdaj . Jan. 6. 

Manager Dowden has arranged one ol 

the hcsl schedules the team bat had in 
\ ears. Theie are fourteen games in all, 

eight of them being played on tbe borne 

Moor, and the large majority <>l tbeae 

borne garnet will be planned forHatur- 
iaj afternoons. Tbe college will have 
the opportunity of seeing two New 

York teams. SI. Lawrence and Hamil- 
ton, plaj here The team will also go 
Sgainsl Harvard, Wislcvan ami Dart- 
mouth, runners up lor the Kar-iern 

( bamplonehip last wintei 

The season's schedule is as follows: 

January 'i. Mlddlebury at Amherst. 

iu. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

" 18, Northeastern at Amherst, 

10. 'lulls ai Mcdfoid. 

'24. Wcsleyaii al Middletown. 

" -ii. New Hampshire state al 
A mbersl , 

11, Harvard si Cambridge. 

February I. M. I. T. at Amherst. 
7. W. P. I al Worcester. 

'• 111. SI. Lawrence at \nilieist. 

IS, Trinity at Hartford, 

17. Rhode island at Ambers) . 

2:1. Hamilton al A mberst. 

March :S. lulls al Amherst. 



HATFIELD CONCERT 

Continued from page 1 

Broderick, l>. <■■ Glowers, It. at. Darting, 
.1. < .. Parsons. 

Sci d Tenors: .J. I',. Kancul. W. B. 

Paddock. P.O. Sears. II. I). Stevenson. 
i;. <;. Wendell, pianist. 

I'iist Haas: I.. B. Arrlngtoa, II. c. 
tforcrose, 1. Blade (leader), K. s. boring, 
\V. W, Wood, B. J. Oorwin, 

Second Bass; P. Gold, A. 8andow, 

J. If. Whittier, B. Bo 

l; l). Fuller. C. A. Towne, Temple- 
ton and Ford with Mowers, Bears, 

Wendell. Luring and Noy es of the 
(■lee (hi h coin pi iae t he or< holla. 

Two concerts have now been sebed- 
n led tor the clubs during the Christmas 
recess, tbe Brat one 10 be in Melrose 
Highlands on Thursday, Dec. gg, and 

[the Boston Alumni concert to be held at 
' the Copley l'la/a 011 Friday. Dec. 




Social armor lo-dgv includeg 

(k)ni<rht clothes ot beautifully 

suit, rich imported fabrics — 

Our evening suits — tailored 

'•to lit." 

The crack custom tailor's 
standard at much less than the 
line tailor's lee. 

Everything d.se for evening 

wear. 

Koukrs I*kkt Company 

Broadway Herald square 

al Itth Si. Four al Mill St 

Convenient 
Broadway Cornera" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren al 4 1 Mt st. 

nf.w roBi cm 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed C.icken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And otliei 1; I tlni.tf* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Ktieet. TH. 4U> W) Hadlej Man* 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

Come in .Hid trj row keys tietwsen see a. ■•< 

l »ce. ttfc, ;oid s SI c. m.. Dee, ISth. 

HENRY ADA/VIS & CO. 

The Rex mil Storm 

The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 
Open under new management, 

I'. D. HOMANS, 

I'rop. 
Tel. 489 W 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Kitchen 



, 






Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



^The^assachysette Collegian, Wednesday ^Pecenib^r 13, 1922. 



TDE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



[BTtM W.81.AI.K W ■dUor-ln-Thief 

U mrn li. Akkinuton "2S Managing Kditor 

III I'AKTMKNT 11 K.\l»s: 



Editorial, 

Athletics. 

Ai'itilt-inii h. 

CaospiM. 



1 1: s im, W. Si \t'l. II 

Al.lllCKT K. WAI "II II 

I.K.WIH II. KH I II "il> 

l.i I mi: It. Alliersi;lo\ "• 

.1 • >ll V <i. ItKM' '-'1 

(II MM SB K. Ol.lMH. .III. '^ r > 

Kuril M. Wool. 'J4 

i.. Wnxnon KKvsKi.v'iM 
John M. Whitti*k'2S 



Faculty. 
Alumni. 

Two-Vial, 

BxchMSjs and 
Communications, sui. Conn* '23 



Business Departmewt. 

Owkn K. Kolsom '28 Business Manager 

ItmiKHi K. Sti'.frf. '24 Advertising; Manager 

CLIFVOSB I.. BSLDBE '24 Circulation Manager 

Dokai.d w. Lewis *» 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The MasaachuaetU Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at second-class matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of pontage provided for in section 110S. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



The next leave «>f the Coixkaiaii 

will l»p on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 10SS. 



Merry ChristmaB. 
Last year the Collb«iae wished its 

readers Ihe ijiade of '.Hi. 7% in finals. 
While we are sit it, let uk make it UH)% 
this year, ami further add our sincer- 
eHl wishes for a most enjoyable Christ- 
nins ami pleasant New Year. 



Fruit Judging Team Results. 
The Fruit Judging Team made a bet- 
ter record la the ooeteel at Peaa. state 
College leal week than the placement 

shows. The second, third, and fourth 
places were so closely contested that a 
■Ingle correal ehaage la one paper of 
any M. A.C. judjjei would have meant 
second place for the team. 



Think It Over! 

Freshmen! Next term's Coi.i.kgian 
Competition is for you— members of 
the -lass of l!»-2ii. The Coi.i.kim an 
Board believes that there is much la- 
tent ability and pent-up enemy in this 
class. Will you accept this opportuni- 
ty to prove what you are worth'.' 

The only requisites which the Board 
specilies for its competitors are a willing- 
ness to work and the ability to write 
clear, concise, correct English. A cer- 
tain amount of routine work will be ex- 
pected of each competitor every week, 
in return for which services the Board 
stands ready to help and eBeoarage its 
understudies in every way possible. 

The advantage! to be derived from 
journalistic work on the campus lie not 
alone in the silver or gold badges which 
are awarded for a certain number of 
credits, but in the training and the 
wide range of acquaintanceships and 

contacts possible through such work. 
Yoiii college paper advertises your col- 
lege in ■ way in which no other activi- 
ty can, and as a recognised Academic 
Activity it deserves the loyal support of 
the student body. Freshmen, this is 
your chance to make good in a worth- 
while cause. Think it over! 



The State College Conference. 

The six-cornered conference of New 

England state colleges and universities 

is in the process of formation and a lirst 

meeting ol delegstee bai been held to 
discuss the possibilities oi such a con- 
ference which would standardize elegi- 
bility rules and perhaps anile i" closer 
athletic relations member institutions 
by permanent schedules. We cannot 
understand the avidity gad positi vein >s 
Of the public press in tpresdiog through* 

out New England detailed accounts of a 
conference at which delegates had so 
executive power to sol for the institu- 
tion I hey represented, an. I furthermore 

representing as facts questions which 

weic simply mailers of discussion. 

There may possibly be s e ulterior 

motive which prompted the action. It 
this is true, our sencor cannot be too 
harsh. 
Certain «>i the Mate colleges and 

universities have Keen very flee in their 
interpretation of elegiblllty niles. p lay- 
inn transfer at udenls (often simply tramp 
athletics,) and freshmen, and allowing 
theetndenl very low in studies to par- 
ticipate continually in sports. The re- 
sult has been superior teams which in 
many cases have outclassed opponents 
who abided by strict eleu'ihility rules. 
The conservative colleges have sought 
their own level constantly, believing it 

io be more advantageous, interesting 

and convenient Io drop athletic re- 
lations with those colleges which 
hull-headedly or otherwise persisted 

in maintaining lowei standarde. This 

has placed some of the universities 
in rather pecular situations. They aie 
forced to play football with the large 
eollegee and universities, and those 
operating under similar standarde. 

It would seem that this arrangement 
has been entirely satisfactory from the 
hub-hub and reckless publicity given 
the recent conference. We are perfectly 
satisfied with the football schedule as 
announced in this issue of the Coi.i.k- 
gian by the athletic department. The 
appearance of colleges new to our sched- 
ule, such as Beneeelaer P, I.. VYeeleyan 
and Williams Introduces an untried 

element, and the older rivals, Tufts. 
Bates. Stevens and Amherst promises 
series of hard contests. Nearby Insti- 
tutions make much more Interesting 

rivals than distant opponenis. They 
are easier to visit, gate receipts are in- 
creased by larger crowds, ami the stu- 
dent body is taxed less heavily because 
of the lower expenses of traveling. 
But this is not the primary reason for 
playing these eollegee in athletics. It 
is their high standing in collegiate 

athletic circles, coupled wiih elegibllity 

rules which are compalable with our 
own. 

Perhaps the Stale colleges and uni- 
versities should assume I he closest 
athletic relations from a strictly ethi- 
cal standpoint, but we fail to sec any 
sound basis why the J should necessari- 
ly combine for this reason alone. It 
should be the option of each college 10 
do as it pleases in the matter of arrang- 
ing athletic games with no cumber- 
some restraint placed upon Its freedom 
to make a schedule satisfactory to 
undergraduates and offieisls. Custom, 
equality of eligibility rules, [size, and 
I wishes of the Students, alumni, and 
J athletic advisors are the foundations of 
'athletic relatione. Artificial alliances 
are to be condemned. 



COMMUNICATION 
To no: KoiToa <>i mi Collegia* : 

luiiv 8ir: 

Permit me to address this commanl- 
eath » the members of the student 

body thru your columns. 

Occasions!)} in Ihe course ol mj con- 
venations m h fa members ol Ibe student 

body, the, question has been raised con- 
cerning the sources of my income. In 

order thai there may be perfect under- 
standing on the pari of all regarding 
ibis mailer. 1 desire to stale Rgaln what 
I have expressed in chapel (and earlier 

gave oat to the press): Ism supported 
i.v contributions from several of the 

denominstlonal hoards, and by gills 
from alumni and friends of the college. 
I am, therefore, not in any sense of the 

word an employee <>t the -i :l te ot Mass- 
achusetts, tho I hope that I am in a 
vciy real seaeeoneof lor servants. 

II may not be out of place to add a 
word concerning Ihe aim of my wmk 
lux ihe campus. I am here lor the 

purpose of helping every student re« 

ganllcss of race or creed to live up lo 

the bigheet aad heel possible for him 
or her in life. All that I do or may do 
will be directed toward this goal. 

Very sincerely yours, 

.John B. II \\\v. 



Town Hall, Amherst 

EXTRA DAY ! 

Wi»dn'il;iv Mareliall Nellan's production, 
u v "PENR0D." in s reels, from 
Booth Tarklnaton's eels 
brated i>< •< >k and plai . w itii 
Wesley FrecKlei Barry. 
Marjoric Daw, Clara Morton 

Scenic red Comedy mi 

ThlirSflaV ; JacKie Coosan, Gloria Hope 
I IIUI auay ; *J~ Wallace Beery in 

i "TROUBLE.": re. u 

Mat. 3, K\e. 

6-45.8-30 News Comedy 



Mni 3, Eve 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 

Mill. 3, Kve. 
(-45. 8-30 

Saturday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



M;ii. 3. Kve 
6-45 8-30 



Owen Moore. Marjorie Daw 
and Kathryn Perry oi"Love 
is an Awful Thin*." 

Sport Review 
Larry Semon m"Dull Care" 

Conway Tearle and Glady* 
Hullettf in "The Referee." 
sons el ii pugilist «ii" be 
t-omes middle weight i limn 
pion. 

I nil Sunshine Comedy 
Newt 

John Bowere, Kathryn Mc- 
Guire and StronRheart. the 
Helirtan Police H<>u'. in "The 
Silent Call." 

Screen Snapshots 

Round No. "■ "The Leather 

Pushers " 



DISCUSSION GROUP 



Mr. Ward's discussion group will 
hold its last meeting of the term Thurs- 
day evening, Dec 14. at *>--!* » P. K., !■ 
Memorial Hall. The subject of dis- 
cussion will be "Judaism". 



JOHN HAYNES HOLMES ON 

THE INADEQUATE VIRTUES 

Loyalty, Patriotism, and Charity 
Should be Practiced Yet Only in 

Broadest Application. 
In chapel on Sunday, Dec. 10, Kev. 

John llaynes Holmes of the Community 

Church of New York City gave a -erinoii 

on the "Inadequate Virtuee'*, a^ he 
tanned them. 

"Unless a virtue is Identified with 
the whole of life ami uuivcisal in ap- 
plication, it is not a virtue St all. 
Loyally is one of these Inadequate 
Virtues. Blind loyalty to just one ideal 
or to merely our own social class is 
bound to load lo moral and social de- 
struction. Patriotism is another virtue 
i hat must ue purified. Blind love el 

country very often leads lo haired of 
other nations. Kdilfa Cavell's last 

memorable Words, before her death at 

the bands of her German captors, era- 
bodied this ideal — words which passed 
almost Unnoticed in the midst of war. 

yet Ihe significance of which thinking 

men of today are appreciating more and 

more. 

Charity is usually a halt-hearted vir- 
tue. We glW because oi custom or 
habit. The need for charity 0) ones from 

a poor balance of the worlds resources 

among the people. The best charity 
which we can perform is to eradicate 
ihe CSUSeS and needs for charity in the 
world by Striving lor a more even bal- 
ance of wesltb. 1'ntil we do this, 
charity, like patriotism and loyalty, is 
an Insdequats virtue.' 1 

"Loyalty and patriotism ought to In- 
clude :rU mankind in their application. 
Charity that Is no! fulfilled in terms oi 

a love embodying the great human 
family is superficial. We are not lodes- 
troy these virtues, however, lull must 

tek< them Into our lite In their broader 
;i pplieal ion." 

Cbompsoii's Oniclp Oiks 

(let FOOT "111 skiites nut and let US pal oil il 

sharpening thai lasts if sou haven't ■ pair, 

conic in and iisK to we oat line of skates. shoes. 
hockej it Ickt, etc 



The Amherst Players 

•/ILL i-i:3 si- \ i 

Marry James Smith's Three-act Comedy. 

MRS- BUMSTEAD - LEIGH 



—AT 



college: hall 

MONDAY, DEC. 18th, 8-15 p. m. 

Tickets 50c. 75c and $1.00 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, h Pone ifiC-R, P. O. Block 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio MASnM < UW >< 'K— Northampton. 
( lull Niu'lit Dances — popular w it li M. A < Ml 
Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone Tci Northampton 

KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

'140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Amherst Book Store 



CHRISTMAS 



Christmas Cards with College Seal 
Pennants and Banners 
Memorabilia Books with College Seal 
New Boxes of Paper with College 

Seal 
Rust Craft Novelties 
New Book of M. A. C. Views 
Ingersoll Redipoint Pencils 



THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 13, 1922. 



| 



<i .* • > 






; ( 



A. 



THEY MAKE YOU GO TO CHAPEL BUT YOU COME 

TO WALSH FROM CHOICE 

) l^K'KK still using the oltMiiHliioiietl till in our simp, hut that now 
^-^^ Knox Vu&nhond we're selling now \h a grout money drawer. 
Kver and ill ways, CONSULT WALSH BEST hy TEST 







CHANCE FOR THREE NEW MEN 
ON WINTER RELAY SQUAD 



Meets Planned with N. H. State and 

and Northeastern, Team will also 

run at B. A. A. Race. 

Candidates: were called out yesterdej 
tor Ihe Winter Belay teara. MscCreedy 

"^:i is the only veteran from last year's 

leain. which means three vacancies in 
be tilled. "Joe" .Sullivan, last year's 

siar, ami Roger Aebeson vers both lost 
by graduation and Woodworlh '2'.i by 
transferring, li Is tbs hope now that a 

race may lie held al the Mid winter 
Alumni Day to lie held <>n .Ian. SO, and 
il is a certainty thai t he learn w 1 1 1 run 
in the I;. \. A. race in Boston Felt. :$. 
Although Una! arrangements bave not 
as yet been made, it looks now as 
though Mass. Aggie would he pitted 
against bet oh! rival New Hampshire 
Mate. Negotiations are a! So under way 
at present Ini a meet with Nniihcastein 
College to he run on March Hat the Bot 
ton V. M. C. A. 

Kxtensivs repairs have just been com- 
pleted on t he outdoor hoard Hack ami 
it is now reported in excellent condi- 
tion. The men who have signified then 

Intentions oi trying out for the team 

are: Mact ready, It. 11. W'oodworih. 
Isaac, Uoheris, Tanner. PiereC, Newell. 
Gilford, Hates, Mallei: and Nelson. 



MRS. EMILY GORDON 
Mrs, Emily Gordon, eife of Professor 

C. K. Gordon, passed away at the Dick- 
inson Hospital Monday, December •!. 
The funeral from their home on Lincoln 
Avenue was held Wcdnesda > afternoon 

and burial w as in tVUdwood. 

Mrs. Gordon was a graduate nurse be- 
fore her marriage, and during the war 

S/M very active in the local Red Cross. 
She was much devilled to her home. 
shewasa woman of outstanding char* 
SCter, of deep sincerity and hnncsl v , 



SUCCESSFUL INFORMAL 

HELD LAST SATURDAY 

A very successful informal was held 

last Saturday. About forty live couples 

attended it. The music, furnished hy 

(Vood worth's orchestra consisting oi 

Woodworlh, i'arker, Adams, Emery, Kul- 
leraad Swift was excellent. As usual, a 
luncheon was served by a caterer in the 
palm •decorated lower hall of Memorial 
Building. The chaperons weie Miss 

lluhbet l rom Smith College ,Mles Staple*. 

From Mount llolyoke, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Smith of the M. A. C. faculty. 



SEVEN TEAMS ON FOOTBALL 
SCHEDULE FOR NEXT YEAR 

The following is Die Ht'iH football 
schedalc as it stands at present : 
Sept. 19. it. P. 1. :tt Amherst. 
Oct. 6. liateH at Lewieton, 
Oct. W. Amherst at Pratt Field, 
tict. 27. Weeleyaa at Mlddletown, 

Nov. :i. Williams at Williainstow n. 
Nov. It). Stevens at Amherst. 
\ v. 17. Tufts at Amherst. 



FRESHMAN DEBATING TEAM 
LOSES TO SALEM HIGH DEC. 8. 

The Freshman debating team, al- 
though they showed the results ol eare- 
hil coaching and preparation, lost, hy a 
dose score, to the Salem High School 

.anion Friday, Dec. S. Flint Dodge, 

iorthe losing Freshmen, Wta the OBt> 

-landing lijjure, while the other mem- 

- of the team, Leo Novlck, Oecai 

i b, and Grant also ditl well. 



C. F. DYER 



'28. — Bath W. Ilurder is now in charge 
ol the greenhouse at BleigbtaB Farms. 
Darling, Pa. 



and one who dared lo he always hersclt. 
she was loved hy all wlm knew her, 
and her untimely death is a meat sor 
row to all her friends. Mis. Gordon 

bad two children, Virginia, aged nine, 
ami Roger. aged one month. 

The deep sympathy of ihe entire 
faculty and student body Is extended 

in Dr. Gordon. 



EXPLANATION 

The Two-year classes contributed *U7 

to Die Bed Cross Drive. 



NOTICE TO FRESHMEN! 

The annual competition for Ihe Fdi 
lorial Hoard of the < oil. Mil \ \ lot 

members ol the Freshman, class will ho- 

Uin with the li" -1 issue ol ue\i icrm, 
which will lie on Wednesday . .Ian . 10, 
and will last tbroUgbOUl ihe entire 
lei in. All Freshmen who desire lo 
compete should signify t heir intent ions 
to the Editors as early as possible next 
term, in order to plan for the lirst issue. 
'I' lie compel il ion will he run on the same 
hasis as Ihe Sophomore compel it ion 
this term, and ihe rules will he posted 
on the Co 1. 1. rot w * Hlice Hulletin Hoard. 



V PI R T K A 1 T >' !■' j 



D A I. TO N 




km 



BY JOHN LONSDAI. 1/ 



The Quaker who made 
Chemistry a Science 




AVENDISH had shown 
that two volumes of hy- 
drogen andoneofoxygen 
always combine com- 
,-letcly to t'orm water and nothing 
else. Proust, a Frenchman, had 
proved that natural and artificial 
carbonates of copper are always 
constant in composition. 

"There must be some law in 
this," reasoned Dalton (1766- 
1844), the Quaker mathematician 
and school teacher. That law he 
proceeded to discover by weighing 
and measuring. I le found that each 
clement has a combining weight 
of its own. To explain this, he 
evolved his atomic theory — the 
atoms of each element are al) 
alike in size and weight; hence 
a combination can occur only in 
definite proportions. 

Dalton's theory was published 
in 1808. In that same year, Na- 



poleon made his brother, Joseph, 
king of Spain. This was considered 
a political event of tremendous 
importance. But Joseph left no 
lasting impression, while Dalton. 
by his discovery, elevated chem- 
istry from a mass of unclassified 
observations and recipes into a 
science. 

Modern scientists have gone be- 
yond Dalton. They have found 
the atom to be composed of elec- 
trons, minute electrical particles. 
In the Research Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company 
much has been done to make this 
theory practically applicable so 
that chemists can actually predict 
the physical, chemical and elec- 
trical properties of com pounds yet 
undiscovered. 

In a world of fleeting events 
the spirit of science and research 
endures. 



G e n e r al ^Elecftr ic 

general Office COIXipa.ny SchtntcttJy.AT.r. 



95-626-ITD 












I* 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 13, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 13, 1922. 



AGGIE REVUE TO BE REPLETE 
WITH NOVELTY AND INTEREST 



nuspices <>l tlif Sx'iill Inion. A I 

though ibe arrengemenl •>•' lbs pro- 
gram is .•i.i'ui ly new. the product loo 
promises to limn- up to the standard 



~ , ,t rru- which iliis typical M. A. C. institution 
Four Excellent Acts Make Up This " • 

hu Ml- III \ -fills lilSl . 



Year's Production. Show Starts 
at 7-30 Friday. 

Tiif Bolster Bolsters er« planning to 
stage for this season's aggie Revue en 
Friday night, Doe. l"». a show which 
will be iiovi-1 ;iinl Interesting lu every 
wav. Tins will 1 > < - undei the dliect 



h;is set ill > fills put. 

Ticket! for (be Aggie Revue are W 
cents ami will be on salt- al the doo* 
Kriiia> night. There will be no ra> 
>.i uil ieata for tbe performaoeo. 

■ji, ,i. i;. 0' tiara is with i he Btate 
Department of agriculture, Harrisburg, 

IV mi. 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 



/1TH $40.00 worth of 
good Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal Mixture, 
well fed with good roughage, 
you can produce at current 
prices $170.00 worth of milk. 

These feeds to be found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealer's stock. 



CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO. 

New York Chicago 



2 3, Protein 



40' , Protein 




^osN^;| 



?*SKte* 



. S^WMimMutrwo*. 

^L^°5? 85 







"«< *%ioViL 

u. s.Ato* 16 "m 

MSt t*0 TV*. . vaS 



CO-ED NOTES 



Last Monday evening from 0:48 until 

8:30 at the Abbey, the three dubs of 
Delta Phi Gamma, Athletic, Literary. 
tad Musical, nave an entertalment tor 
the Freshman gtrle. Following the 
entertainment, refreshments wow 

Sl-IVfll. 



The tea which the members of the Y. 

w. 0. A. cabinet were planning to give 

last week for members of the V. W. C. 
A. Advisory Council lias been postponed 
Indefinitely. It maybe held some time 
in the early part of ISXl term. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO t92S 



Work hits been began OB the clothing 
which members of the Y. \Y. C. A. are 

to make for the Rlrle al ■ school In 

Imiiu where M is. Kilil h Smith, who look 

eonraeaal H. a.C.,lael year now teaches. 
Home of ibe work will be taken home by 

several of the meinbcis who will sew 

during tbe Cbrll mas vaeatlon. 



The Christinas party which is held 

every year nndor the auspices of tbe v. 

W.C A. will be hebl ill the Abbt-y next 

Mimliiy evening at six o'clock. Mem- 
bers of the Advisory Council will he 

piesent A \ . \V. C. A. supper will be 
followed by the distribution of the 
Christmas stockings which are being 
lilb-U with RiftB this week, by special 

music, and by earol-ei Offing. Then, 
while everyone is gathered around tbe 
Breplace, MIm Gcessmann will tell an 
original Christmas story. "'Qermalne 

the Grateful". The CbtHdmaa party 

has ;il ways been one of ibe most enjoy- 
able limesofthf whole year and the 

oomlng party will be n<> exception. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - NlaB8 

Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all o< casiona. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 

"PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Prominent anions the 

I , oik. us Makes * B I i-.it in »• 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX ST0CKIN6 
At $1.55 

is ii |OOd VSlBS for women who want the belt 

there ta n< s seesalssi stocking t lut t >.-t 

will III the iinkles niniU. 



\ groapof girls from the Abbey will 
sine; Christ mas Carols at the Old Ladles' 

Home ill North Amherst some evening 
this week, probably Saturday. Last 
year about ten gilts went : it isexpeeted 
that ill least twenty will go this year. 



Tin- t.irl Scout meet log of December 
;iiih, held in the cooking laboratory In 
Fernald Hall urea given over to a talk by 

Miss Coll way on "Collect Table-set I i nu 

This talk is a pari ol the preparation for 
Second ( lass Test 



G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



The t.iii Scout meeting of December 

twellth was held in Btockbridge Hall, 
the usual meeting place. Miss- Trot I 
siave the Tenderfoot Test Io those ready 
lor it. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9 J 



EXP. STATION SEMINAR 



Discussion on Exp. Station Editorial 
Policy Led by Dr. Cance of 
Faculty 
Tbe bi-weekly seminar of tbe Experi- 
ment Station Staff was attended by it 

large number of faculty members on 

last Monday. Dec. 4. and took the form 
of a very interestsng disenssion of the 
Experiment station Editorial Policy. 
The Seminar was led by Doctor Cance, 
who read a paper on "Tl_' Rights of the j 

Author". This was followed by Mr. 

Rand, who spoke on "'The Duties of an I 
Editor". Tbe subject of Mr. Lyons' > 
talk of the Extension Service was "The 
Preparation of Copy", and Mr. .1- B. 
Abbott of the Experiment Station stall 
talked on "Reconciling Authors' Rigb 
and Editor's Duties 



After Every 
Meal 




Tin- second in the series of faculty — 

dauies will be held in Memorial Hall 5 
this evening, Dec. 18, at 7-4.*) P, Hi S 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Finals are due, so be sure to have your Fountain Pen right. Our line is the best. 



TRY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for lirst -class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleaaaat St., am bent, Mass. 

T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order • $35.00 to $45.00 

Raincoat* 
rtulte Pressed SOc MtHtsrj Tailoring 



OVKK MUMS' 1)1.1 i. STORK 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

HBvf PRIt I HI 

Men's Whole Soles. KiiMn-i Heels . . 



Men s Half Snici- . Rubber Heel* 

Men's Kill. Iici Soles. liiililier l.'eels 
Men's Half Soles 



$2.50 
$1.75 

$2.25 
$1.35 



Work Qaaraateed— amiikicsi not si. 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

i ic;us anil I 'iuaiciies Bpecta. price per earton 

on Ctgsrsttt 

Si-lirulTt'N Chocolates ami Other leiiiljnu lines. 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 

Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday . Thurs- 
day, Saturday, 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoa nut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



The Period of Thrift 

The periods of discovery iind pioiicel- 

in the dairy industry arc largely 

i ist anil the rewards of prosperity ait) 

lor those who today faithfully practice 

Industry and thrift. 

Among these met hods ol thrift and 
" my none are of more vital import- 
ance than the safe, sweet, wholesome 
sanitary cleanliness which the use of 



C/eaner 



and C/ejnse/\ 



-" eonaiatentlj provides to an Increasing 

number of successful dairies, creameries 
sod cheese factories. 

Ibis distinctive Wyandotte cleanli- 

BCSS is the basis of thrift and economy 

11 dairy production for it is so unusually 

lent in its natural cleaning action, 

iso thoroughly yel simply applicable, 

uniform in its distinctive quality, 

- so protective of high quality milk 

■'its. is no harmless to the hands 

»nd to metal equipment, and costs *q 

jbfle that every particle to the last grain 

'n the barrel bespeaks thrift for the 

) industry. 

Indian In 
circle 



< )rder from 




your supply house. 



**e ■' 15. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers, 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



PRES. MURLIN AT ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page 1 



I 



complete his daily tasks to the very best 
of his ability. 'Live ;i decent life and 
meet your work fairly and squarely, II 
you want to succeed.' Buofa was his, 
working formula for living, which is 
very simple and yet so hard lor us to 

abide by . 

Roosevelt, although of a poor phy- 
sique in early life, by driving blms*lfto 

work, came through almost the acme of 
physical perfection, The skllllill use 
of a well developed body was coordi- 
nated with an unusual capacity fol 

mind concentration. Roosevelt could 

almost read a I k, while most persons 

were perusing ihc table ol contents. In 

othei words, he could pick out at a 
glance the topic thought of each para- 
graph, which was sufficient for him to 

^liisp I he idea of t he anl ln>r. 

liooscvelt realised tbe trinity of man 

in that he not only developed body ami 
mind but spirit also. Daring his ad- 
ministration, he mice said coming from 
church. T would not have the vision, let 

alone the strength and courage loatand 

in the Office 1 hold .if it were not lor my 
weekly com in un ion with God.' He Was, 
as arc most great men. a thorough Stu- 
dent ol the Bible. lie especially heeded 
Christ when he said, 'lie ye doers ol I lie 
word and not hearers only." 



POSTER COMPETITION OPEN 

TO ALL STUDENTS OF M. A. C. 

The Union Meeting Executive Corn- 
Bit tee otters ISO. Oil in prizes to be di 
tided as follows: slo.tMi: siu.OO; and 

$0.00 for the best deaigo suitable for a 

poster for the I'nion Meeting. All 
worthy designs sobmtted are to be ex- 
hibited in Horticultural Hall. Boston, 
Jannary 10, 17, 18, 10, IMS, during the 
Fifth Annual I'nion agricultural Meet- 
ing. Competent judgee will award tbe 
premiums. These deslgne must be In 

the hands oi Mr. A w. I hard, t:t«> 

State House, Boston, not later than 

Jan. 15, l'.»2:5, or may be handed to Prof. 

i'\ A. vTaagb, Wilder Hall, before Jan. 

to. 

Design lo be in inches x in inches 

with two inch margin and must In- 
drawn on white stock and aol over two 

colors used. Oncol these colors may 
be used as a hack" ion nil or hot h colors 

nay be combined in ibe design. These 

colors must be used in Hat tones 
Care must be Lakefl not to grade cither 
of these colors as it will increase the 

cost oi plate making. Whenever shad- 
ing is required use full Strength of 
either color. 

BOM in mind that the simpler thOM 

designs or posters are handled (he more 
value they have as an advertising 
medium. 
There is do restriction as to where 

tl, esc colors are to lie used, but would 
BUggMl that the while stock be allowed 

t,. do some of tin- drawing. 

Name and address must be on back 

of each design submitted. 

Further Information can be secured 
by consulting Professor Waugh. 



MacCREADY AND TANNER 
GET CROSS-COUNTRY LETTERS 

At the last meeting Of the Athletic 

Board, football and track letters wen- 
awarded for the season just Qoiabed. 
I). K. MacCready '38 and Edwin Tanner 
'88 received the only two crcas-eouotry 

letters for their good work while with j 
the team in all meets last fall. 



TWO-YEAR DRAMATICS 

Under the direction oi Prof. Pal ler> 
■on, a number oi two-year students are 
rehearsing foi several short plays which 
are to be presented in the near rutttre 

The members ol each cast belong lo the 

Two*year Dramatic club, which has 
been becoming more popular ot late, 
and such interest is being shown thai 
the else ol ibe club baa Increased rap- 
Idly, fbe officers of tbe club recent I) 

elected ,,i ■ Walter Cutler, president: 
Kenneth S.itibury, \ ice-pi esidciil ; and 

Miss I'hilii . \\ i -i.sici , S( cretan . 



i mil I ees, K.XeCUti Ve Slid Social . W e I c also 

i elected, Tbe members ol the Kxeoutive 
Committee arc: Predonna l^eltch, Bat 
old Weatervell and Milton Allen. Tbe 
members ol tbe Social Committee are 
Eunice Austin, Herman Bwenbrck, 
lidward Barnicle, Alton Adams, and 

Edward B, Kelly. 



SENIOR TWO-YEAR CLASS 

HAS ELECTIONS THURSDAY 

The Senioi Two-year (lass met after 
tssemhl) last Chursdaj In Btockbridge 
Hall to elect oflieera for the remainder 
of the college year, The following 
oiliccrs wen- chosen: president, John 
Armstrong; vice-president, Kveretl 
Woodward s, -creian . Beatrice Klej la : 
treasurer, Paul Swanson. Two com- 



SENIOR CLASS MEETINC 

The Sen lot class held a meeting after 

Vss.-inbly last week at which lino- iioin 

Inattons were made for Ibe 1088 Com- 

iiiciiccmciit Committee. Those nomi- 
nated were: Polsom, Dowden, Wirth, 

I'licnd, Ileal. Alger, and llilyilld The 

elass also voted In holdahmokei ihis 
week Thursday, the time and place ol 
w hoh will be announced later, 



INDEX PICTURES 

The following pillules will be taken 
for Ibe lii'ii i- ill Mills' Studio nc\l Nun 
da) iiioi nine : 

10-80 \. m . tlpba Sigma Phi. 

in i.". \. m .. Phi "-luina Kappa. 

1 1 00 \. m . </. T. V. 

II IS \ . m .. Bolster I bilsl e i 



SaviiiR of 2b% to 40;i on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you an* it> need <>l an\ kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask us to show you whatever you may be 
interested in. ii you don'l think that \<m will save from 
iy, in jo per cent., we don'l wanl you to buj any- 
thing, because we are doing business on litis 
basis. I'. S. Rubbers $1-25 per pair. 
\\ 1 ;ilso do lii°;lt grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis thai you must be satisfied or your shoes will In- 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are .is 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2*25 

Men's whole Neolin solet with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber beds, sewed. - - 1.70 

Rubber heels ol any kind, 5<> 1 Is per pair. 

We will sew stiles il your shoes are (jnodycar welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



■ 



The Ma^rhusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 13. 1912. 



GET YOUR GIFTS IN AMHERST 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS <£ GAULT 



a man wears. 



EXAMINATION SCHEDUl 


December 18 


to 22. 


MiiMlAV, D 


BC. 1H 


7-r»(t t<> (MM) 


A.M. 


(iitori- 


1 


Animal II usbandry SO, 


114 


Chemistry 51. M 2« 




Kconoinie Sociology 51, 


CH A 


Floriculture 68, Fll C 




Horticulture 50, Fll, f 




Poultry 80, 111 




F.o mic Sociology 75 


KII B 


Kiirm Management 7°\ 


102 


Land Hardening so. \VH A 


Dairy SI 1, II, III, IV, 


Fl. M 


10-00 A.M. t<» 


12-tM) M. 


QBOUP 


II 



Chemistry 1, ¥h M 
Chemistry 4, PL M :md Kit 1) 
Floriculture 50, KII G 
Pomology 501,11, Wll B 
Agricultural KcoiiKinics70.cn A 
Botany W, <M1 B 
Rural EugiaeetiBg 76, lOS 
Animal Husbandry SI, 114 
UK) to 8-00 p. m. 
OHO 11" A 

Zoology 15, KB D 

Bnral Boclology go, Wll B 

Agricultural Economics SI, ('II A 
Horticulture B8, KH K 

Poultry s:t, U 

3-10 to 5-10 i'. m. 
iiiiour in 
Mathematics 1 

(Prof. Machmer) MB B 
(Prof. Porter) KH K 
(Prof. Moore) KB I) 
Bntonology BB. KB K 

Dairy 50, KB M 
Krench 50, KH D 
Carman 50, KH C 
Bnral Journalism 50, 110 

Agricultural BcoeosBlee 77, OH A 
Agricultural Education 51, it 1 7 

Chemistry 80, M 80 

Mat banal ten 76, MB D 
Pomology 7'>. Wll B 
Poultry 76,818 
Veterinary 76, VB B 

Horticulture B5, KH I 

Tl 'K.8IIAY, Dkc . 10 
7-50 to 9-50 a. m. 

IV 



UISOUP 

Krench and Herman 1 and 4 

(Prof. Ashley) CH A 

(Prof. Julian) 10'2 

(Prof. Mackimmie) Fll II 

(Prof. Thiaaell) KB 1) 
Microbiology 50, M 28 
Public Speaking 50 1, II, HI, HI 
Zoology 50, KB (i 
Floriculture SI, FH K 

10-tK) A. M. to 18-00 M. 
QBOUP V 

Krench 25, FH D 

Krench 28, KH II 

tier in an 86, 108 

German 28, Fll C 

Agricultural Economic* 50, c\l A 

Agricultural Education 50, 110 

Agronomy 50, 111 

History and Government 54, Fll F 

Mathematics 50, MB B 

Agricultural Education 70, 317 

Bntomology 70. EB K 

Horticulture Manufactures 75, KB M 

Band Gardening 75. Wll A 

Animal Husbandry S3, 18 

Veterinary SI, VB B 

1-00 to 3-00 i\ M. 
OHO if H 

Physics 25, CH A 

Horticulture Manufactures SI, FB M 

Rural Home Bife S3, AH 



3 10 to 5-10 P. M- 

QBOUP VI 

Animal II usbandry 85, 114 
Bural Home Bife 86, All 

Botany 58, (II B 

Animal Husbandry 75, 108 
Pomology 77, Wll B 

Poultry 75, 113 
Spanish 75, KII II 

Pomology si. km K 

WlliNKSOAY, 1>K<\ 80 

7.:,o to 8-60 a. m. 

QBOUP VII 

Microbiology 1, M '2 s 

Military 1, UH A 
Bural Home Bile 1 . 108 

Microbiology 86, M 28 
Military 86, KB D 
Agricultural Education 51, «n 
Bogllab 53, no 
Bngllaa 60, KH K 
Military 50, MB D 
Spanish 50, Fll H 

German 75. KII C 

Mathematics 75 MB P> 
Military 75, MBG 
Dairy S2. KB M 
Rural Engineering S2. 19 

10-00 a. m. to 18-00 M. 

QBOt I' VIII 

agronomy l,CH A and BB i> 
Bural Home Bife 50, BB K 
French 75. Fll II 

Dairy SI [X, X, XI, FL U 
Vegetable Gardening el, ru r. 

1-00 to 3.00 P. M- 

aaooP « 

Botany 25, CH A and KB D 

Agronomy si 

(Mr. Thayer) 12 
(Mr. Banpheai) 114 

3-10 to 540 P. m 
QBOUP IX 

Bngllab 1 

(Mr. Bogholt) 12 
(Prof. Patterson) 114 
(Prof. Prince) KH K 
(Prof. Band) KII K 

i ihemistry 86, KB M 

Botany 50, CH A 

Botany 58, CH B 

Physics 50, PL C 

Botany 75, CH K 

Chemistry 70. M 28 

Bnral Sociology si, BB l> 

Thursday. Dbc. 21 
7-50 to 8-60 a. m. 
aaouP x 

English 86, Kll t 

Band Gardening 50, Wll B 
Agronomy 75, 102 
Floriculture 75, FH C 
Band Gardening 70, Wll A 
Pomology 80, Fll I> 
Veterinary 78, VB B 
Agricultural Apporl S, 110 
Animal Husbandry S (gen), 18 

Vegetable Gardening 88, KH 11 

10-tM) to 18-00 A. M. 

QBOUP xi 

Drawing 86, Wll B 
Entomology 50, KB D 
Entomology 54, EB K 
Forestry 55, KH H 
('(instruction S, 102 
Floriculture S3. FH C 
Floriculture so. Kll 1) 
Microbiology 88, M88 
Pomology S3, Kll K 

1-00 to 3-00 P. M. 
QBOUP D 

Rural Engineering 86, 108 

Poultry SI. 12 



M IBAMOBMKNT KX v M 1 RATIONS 

Agricultural Eeonomlca 80 
Agricultural Edncatlon 80 

Bui any 65, 85 
Microbiology 81 , 82 

Music :.l) 

Bural Sociology 76,78 
Zoology 75 

Tbeacbeduled lime for axaminatloni 
may not beebanged. In case of eon- 

tlici between a icpeat and an advanced 

course, 1 he advanced course ftxamina- 

,„,,, is to be taken as scheduled and 

arrangementa made for ibe re). eat 

course examination. 

GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 
Candies ano Fruits 



MASON A. DICKIiNSON, Proprietor 



S. S. HYDE 

optloliiii «»«i«l Jeweler 
a pieaaant street (apone tttijiit • 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Itiu' Hen .Mario « l..< ks amt <>l lifi I ; .- 1 i:i t . I ,- MafcM 

Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Bui mm wonlna Heasl fi B.Oanwne'M 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS :oi<l ;. 11 the 

mumn axtac*. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Horn* Bro*. Neckwear 

outer \our next Bait « o\eiv..;il Hen ihiw. 
iwt Relectium of WoiiteM In the lateal pat 
terns always on hand. The Bt«b«inallti >•( i»ui 
work la apparent on fanci ■araMati l > > us. 

LABROVITZ. 

Tailor and Haberdaiher. 
11 a mity si . Nexl loWaatera UateaTaLOBIra 



The Largest and Best Assortment 

— OK— 

College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW 1' RICKS 

Stockings to Match 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



INCORHORATKD 

878-879 Bigti St., H.dyoke 

Tel. W 82 W 63 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-HKAI.KUH IS 



DRV AND FANCY GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's 0ffice~$1.00 

$1.10 by mail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 "P- 
See them in our window 



« 



»fc3 



hoe Store 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

''Reasonable in dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma** 



C*rp*rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

No r, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 10, 1923. 



No. 11 



MUSICAL CLUBS PERFORM results of tryouts for 
TWICE ON BOSTON TRIP 1923 PR0M SH0W announced 



Concert at Melrose Well Attended 

Despite Weather. Annual Affair 

at Copley Plaza Goes Well. 

The annual Christmas trip of the 
Mimical Clubs, although oonaiattng of 
nnly two concerts this season, was very 
successful. The lirst concert was held 
in the Co ng re ga tional Cboreb, Malroat 

Highlands, on Dec. 2H, and the second 
at the Copley Plana Hotel. Boston, 01 
Dae. 19. The weather conditions W6N 
unfavorable from the start, and trans- 
portation facilities were bo poor that it 
was only with great difficulty that many 
of the club members reached (he 
appointed meeting-places. 

The clubs assembled at the North 
.Station at 4-4"» Thursday afternoon 
The ladies of the Congregational Church 
bad intended to furnish supper for the 
nana, but on account of the storm they 
were unable to do this, so the men tilled 
in the time until rj-55 by attending va- 
rious restaurants and theaters. tJpoa 
I lieir arrival at Melrose Highlands, the 
dubs proceeded to the Congregational 
<hureh, where the following urogram 
was presented : 

<>le Uncle Moon 

liella N'apoli 

(il.EK Cl.Ult 

Trot de Cavalerie 
Moment Musical 

< >i:< nisi ka 
Sextet from Lucia 
• ibl King Cole 

Ci.kk t'l.i i: 
Continued on p»g« S 



COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 
OF FIVE CHOSEN BY 1923 

The Senior class has chosen as its 
• "iiimenceinent commiliee the follow- 
ing five men : James A. lieal of Abing- 
toa, chairman ; Mason W. Alger of West 
llridgewater, Owen K. Foisotn of Kos- 
liadala, Philip 15. Dowden of Sandwiih. 
and Roger 1$. Friend of Dorchester. 



MR. A. D. TAYLOR '05 

of Cleveland, Ohio, 

"ie of the foremost Landscape Archi- 
"ects in this country at the present 
. will speak to the 

LANDSCAPE CLUB 

in French Hall, Room F 
Thursday, Jan. 11 at 2-50 P. M. 



411 those interested are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



"ASucceB8fulCalamity"byClareKum- 

mer to Give Good Chance for 

Experienced Acting. 

The following is the OBtl selected for 
t be Prom show : 
Marguerite, Eleanor \V. Katcman ~'l'.\ 

Kmmic, Marguerite R. Boawortb '^ts 

.Julia, I'lanccs B. Marlin ti 

Alberline, Margiiiet Shea 'ffl 

Wilson, II. Karlc \Vcatlierwa\ 'J t 

Kafalo, llieodore .1. (irant ''J<l 

Conaora, Etobarl V. Martin '2:1 

Hcldeii, Malcomn B, HasUell *24 

Clarence, ( arnd) A, Towne '2h 

Gnorga, Robert M. Darling "24 

Kddie. 

Dr. Hrondie. (iuslal K. Lindakog *fl 

Tr\-outB for the Prom show wen- 
held last Friday. The play selected is 

•\\ Saeeaaafnl Calamity" be Clara 

Kiiininer. Because of the large prOBOT- 
(ion of experienced talent selected, the 
show should be well carried mil. The 
parts were exceedingly well contested 
for. Such large numbers of competi- 
tor- tinned out mat it was unusually 
difficult to make selection*. 

Wilton, a middla-agad millionaire 
business man is complaining thai sinre 
he married he has nol enjoyed the 
home life be had expected. Connors, 
the butler, made the remark, "The 
poor don't get to go very often,'. This 
sets Wilton to thinking anil he decides 
to tell his family that he has lost his 

money. 

Continued on page 3 



SEXTET STARTS SEASON 

WITH B. D. GAME TOMORROW 



Hard Workout and Fast Scrimmage 

End. Week of Preparation for 

Varaity Hockey Squad. 

With a strenuous week of haniprae- 
tise. including several long work-outs, 
brought to a close by a si limmage be- 
tween team A and B Saturday morning. 

Coaeta Colltna feels that he has enoagb 

lirst rate mnteiial U) insure that Aggie 
will he represented on the ice this sea- 
son, (old weather has kepi the rink in 
fair condition and no practicing has 
been done under serious handicaps 

Captain "Doc" Cordon is fast shaping 
into his old time lorm and baton the 
season is over should earn reaped 
among his opponents. "Shorty" llods- 
doii, who bus beta kepi I mm the Ice by 
a week's illness is ba«-k in uniform and 
bis work at defence has been nothing 
but the best. With these two men the 
only veterans of last year's winning ag- 
gregation. < 'oaeli Collins has done very 
well to whip into shape several othei 
men. with less experience but just as 
much ambition, who will play regular 

po8itons this year. 

Continued on par* 4 



NORTH DAKOTA DEBATERS 
WIN 2-1 DECISION OVER M.A.C. 



First Intercollegiate Debate of Mass. 
Aggie This Year is Won by West- 
erners. Discussion Spirited. 

Noith Dakota Agti'ies met the 
Mass. aggi« team in a debate held 
in the upper* hall of the "Memorial 
Building on last Monday night. The 
subject was: litxnlretl, thai tbcTowner- 
Bterlieg Hill should be enacted into 
law in the (Jolted Stales. Nmlli Dako- 
ta was repreaeated by s. M. Thorflnaaoa 

and .J. A . St iirhingsmi, who look the 

affirmative, and Mass. Agglea by c. v. 

< interiiiaii and Benjamin Cam/lie, who 

took t be negative. 

The albriuative argument was opened 
by St in langson, who explained what 
the hill provides for, principally a De- 
partment of Kducal imi to he headed by 
a secrclaiy ot hducalion, who shall be 
a member oftbfl I'resiilenl 's caliinel. 
Bad BB appropriation ol ^otMl.tllltl to be 

used in the promotion ot education. 

He pointed OBl that education makes 

for better citiseaablp and is therefore 
eaaeatlaliy a national problem, The 

bill is not perfect, but supplies a foun- 
dation upon which to work. A prece- 
dent was cstahlisheil in the founding of 
I he Department of Commerce, Labor, 
and agriculture, ami a depart men t of 

Education is needed. 

Tborfinneon brongbl out live points 

for which the bill supplies help, — 

Americanization, lessen inn of illiteracy , 
physical education, better training of 
teachers, and eqnallaiag of educational 
opportunity. Each is a natural prob- 
lem, so it is the duly of the. govern- 
ment to meet them all. MasKaeliuset Is 

and Connecticut are leaders In educa- 
tion but illiteracy lias increased bore n 

the past ten years. Kvery educational 
Bociety interested in public sehools 
favors t be bill. 

The negative, emphasized the tact 
thai education is a local problem and 
Continued on page 6 

TWELVE FRESHMEN PLEDGE 

IN MONDAY CHAPEL 

\ i . i-ir \ Biotta i'ii i . 

Charles N. Sullivan Fall l.'iver 

Alden II. Doolittle N'orthlield 

KAI'I'A OAMUA Till. 

Kdwi" Tucker Itablwinsville 

Raymond Otto Lawrence 

Arthur Cane North IJrooklield 

Windsor Wade A adovei 

BWati phi i.rsn.o.v. 
Edward Itowen Westlield 

AM'IIA i.V.MMA BBO. 

Harold Hatch Melrose 

Ernest Dick Lawrence 

!.AMI!I»A (III ALPHA. 

Peter Gaskill Worcester 

Dniiealt Hollingsworth Providence, K.I. 
Henry Simonds Winchester 



VARSITY QUINTET OPENS 
SEASON WITH 32-14 WIN 

Middlebtiry is the Victim and, Though 

Led Well by Captain Leonard, 

is Outplayed. 

Last Saturday the Mass. Aggie varsity 
quintet won its Brat game of the season 

agalnal Mlddlebury to tbetSBaof S8*le. 

The Maroon was always in the lead and 
at no time worried by lbs opposition. 

Eddie Bike, who had been declared In- 
eligible earlier in the week . was nol i lied 

the nig hi before the game that amlatake 

had been made in I he compilation of I lie 
reOOldfl and that he would he allowed 
to play. 

The game started off fast and within 
fifteen seconds Eddie Hike took the lirst 
shot at the Green Mountain basket, A 
foul nave two chances for a free shot, 

both of which were missed, lint almost 

Immediately EdTnmej passed halt the 
length of the Boor to Willie Harsbnsaa 

wlm sank the lirsi double counter. Mid- 

dlehury then scored from the foulllne, 

A clever combination took the visitors 

by earprlBB and quick panel eg gate Hike 

the ball under the basket whence he 
easily added two to the total, lie was 
going like a whirlwind and almost at 
once he made another basket liom the 
floor, making the score 8-1 in favor ol 
i lie home team. At this point Middle- 
bury seemed to liml ilscll and they nol 
I heii lirst basket from I he Hour, only to 
have il offset by another tiom Marsh 
man. 

Frit/. Feiranti, fresh in t he game, shot 
a pretty foul and added one to t he store, 
hut Hob|iiist cot away and dribbled 
down I he floor for a basket. The teams 
were both playing last and Captain 
\|;iis|iinan slipped unnoticed under the 
visitors' basket where a long pass found 
him ready to score again, inakiny the 
total ll-r>. A foul gave Feiranti an- 
Otbet chance to test his eye and it was 
not found wanting- Three louls in suc- 

eession netted us nothing and gave 
Mlddlebury one point. Bat lbs Maroon 

came back strong and carried the ball 
under the basket although it took them 
four shots before Feiranti linally drop- 
ped it through the net. Marsh man 
followed with along dribble down t he 
floor and with a pretty shot made his 
points. A foul gave Mlddlebury saof bei 

Continued on pafo 2 

KENNETH A. SALMAN CHOSEN 
1923 FOOTBALL CAPTAIN 

A i the. football banquet held just be- 
fore finals Kenneth A. Salman IW21 ol 
Needham was elected as captain for the 
coining season. Salman baa bees active 
ever since BBtei ing college, having been 
twice class president, playing class foot- 
ball Imh freshman year, and having just 
completed his second year on the foot- 
ball field with the varsity. He is a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha. 



3. 
> 
o 
r 
5*' 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10, 1923. 



Athletics 



MIDDLEBURY DEFEATED 

Continued from page 1 



try which they did not throw away and 
left the score 10-7 a« the half ended. 
Almost as soon as the second period 
started Fritz Ferranti rang up two BON 
point! and a penalty gave Miildlelnnv 
another chance from the foiilline. The 
visiting captain, Leonard, was in good 
form and dropped the ball through 
auain, as he did at almost every oppor- 
tunity throughout the name. Ferranti 
from the foiilline and Bike from the 
floor added three points to the Massa- 
chusetts column and after a substitution 
the former dropped in both of theshots 
for a double penalty. Samuels then 
made the most sensational shot o! the 
name, dropping the ball neatly through 
the hoop from m'ultloor. Ferrauli scored 
again from the Hoor and the visiting 
captain once more shot from the foul- 
line, and then again from the Boor. 
TOWM got away with a beautiful shot 
from the near corner and Barrows shot 
correctly from the free throw mark. 
Kd Turaey then dribbled into a near 
comer and with a backhand shot made 
a basket. Bike made the closing score 
of the contest after a long dribble down 
the floor, leaving the score :$2-14. 

Captain Marshman and Bike starred 
for the home team and Captain Leonard 
showed up well for the visitors. 

Summary: 

M. A. C. 

h. r. r. 

Barrows, If Oil 

Ferranti, If ■ '> •' 

Turney, rf 10 2 

Samuels, rf 10 2 

Marshman, c 5 10 

Bike, rg 4 1 

Hale. Ig 

Seaver, Ig Jl) 

18 « 82 



Sophomore class has so far lieen poor. 
Field events are especially overlooked 
ami men are needed for shot-put, hlgfa 
h indies, and especially for the high 
jump. 

This is the first season in many years 
when Indoor track meets have been on 
the athletic progrttm. Already the ath- 
letic department hasairanued a sched- 
ule that will assure keen competition. 
A relay race with Williams will inaug- 
urate the season on .Ian. 20. Feb. 8 
will see a trianjrular meet between New 
Hampshire. Vermont, and Mass. Aggie 
on the B. A. A. track. The team will 
next appear at (he K. of C. meet at Me- 
chanics Building in Boston on Feb. 17, 
although their opponent has not been 
definitely decided upon as yet. Man- 
ager Steele announces a tentative date 
with W. P. I. for a meet at Worcester 
on Washington's birthday, and March 8 
Northeastern will be met at the Boston 
V. M. C. A. 



1925 AND 1926 WIN IN 

FIRST INTERCLASS GAMES 

Th« first games of the Interclass bas- 
ketball series were played off last Fri- 
day night, Jan. 5, before a good crowd 
of spectators on the Drill Hall Moors. 



The underclassmeu were the winners 
in both cases, the Seniors being de- 
feated by the Sophomores 14-8. and the 
Juniors falling before the Freshman 
team. The games were fast and inter- 
esting to watch, and augur well for the 
future of the series. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10, 1923. 



N 



M 



Winter Clothes for Winter Sports 



MlIUM.KlUlllY. 

CI a war, rg 

Hilipiist, lg 

Sikorski, c 

W. Leonard, rf 

C. Leonard. If (Capt.) 

Axtell. c 

Towne, rf 

Lamb, rf 

5 4 14 

Referee— Esdjornson of Springfield. 
Score at half time M. A. €. 10, Middle- 
bury 7. Time— twenty minute halves. 



H. K. r. 

t) 

1 Q 2 

10 2 

2 4 8 

10 2 




INTERFRATERNITY RELAY 

SCHEDULE STARTS JAN. 12. 

The following schedule of intcrfra- 
lemily relay has been announced: 
Jan. 12— Delta Phi Alpha vs. Q, T. V. 
Kappa 8MB! Phi vs. Phi 

Blgnaa Kappa 
Alpha Blgrna Phi vs. Theia 
(hi 

Kappa BigMt vs. Lambda Chi 

Alpha 

Jan. 15— Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Kappa 
Lpsilon 
Delta Phi Alpha vs. Kappa 

(iamma Phi 
Alpha BigBta Phi vs. Lambda 

Chi Alpha 
Alpha liainma Bho vs. Sigma 
Phi Lpsilon 
Jan. 19— Kappa Lpsilon vs.lJ.T. V. 

Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Delta 

Phi Alpha 
Thcta Chi vs. Sigma Phi Lp- 
silon 
Alpha (lamina Kho vs. Kappa 
.Sigma 
Jan. 22 — Delta Phi Alpha vs. Kappa 
Lpsilon 
Kappa (lamma Phi rs.Q. T. V. 
Alpha Sigma Phi vs. Kappa 

Sigma 
Alpha Uatmna Kho vs. Theta 

Chi 
Sigma Phi Lpsilon vs. Lambda 
(hi Alpha 
Jan. 20— Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Q. T. V. 
Kappa Sigma vs. Sigma Phi 



All Wool Skating Hone 
Corduroy Knickera 
Plaid Profile Shirt* 
Heavy Army Wool Shirta 
Hockey Ulovea 
Two-in-One Lined Glovea 
Heavy-weight Golf Hoae 



Have you been in to see our stock of classroom supplies P We have note books, note paper- 
stationery to meet your every need. Also confectionery, tobacco, toilet articles. 

RESTAURANT ADJOINED. Open until 11 P.M., Saturdays, 7 P. M. 

Y El AG G I E INN, By the Campus Entrance. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

The House of Kuppenheimer Good Clothes 



Academic Activities 
MUSICAL CLUBS TRIP 

Continued from p»f« 1 



Clarinet Solo 

Rohkkt Fii.i.kk ''23 
College Songs 

Quia Ci.in 
Mountain Echoes Waltz 
liohemiana 

()K< IIKHTHA 



College Skits 

II. F.aiu.e Wk.atiikrwax '24 
Vocal Solo 

Hoy Noaoaoaa "2fi 
Tobacco 
Old Ulack Joe 

«.i i i Ci.nt 

Sons of Old Massachusetts 

('(IMIIINKII CSLOM 

The program as planned had to ha 
subjected to a few changes because of 
the absence of several men. After the 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 

"THE LOVES Or PHARAOH." Great est gpectacalar fllm ever made. 

K. A. CoLplVnt ..resents "TOLA IN LOVE/' a ™.uedjr with music. 

Special Orchestra of 15 Symphony Artist*. | 



TONIGHT 

THURSDAY 
Jan. II 



Fri. and Sat. 
Jan. 12. 13 



Coa.uac. Talaaait In "THE HTMT1VE LOVER" 



SAVE YOUR MONEY 

by Buying Your Suit or Overcoat Now 

Many fine Norfolk models in our assortment of suits which 

we are selling at a reduction of 20 per cent 

from the regular marked price. 

All Fancy Soft Cuffed Shirts at a Reduction of 20 per cent. 

This is a good time to stock up on them. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



NINETEEN MEN AWARDED 

FOOTBALL MS LAST TERM. 

As a result of the last seasons work 
on the gridiron the followiug men have 
been awarded their varsity letters by 
the Athletic Board: 

1923-Caplain Grayson, Abele. Mud- 
Kett, Nowers, Tumey, Beal, Alfjer. 
Mohor, Sargent. Dowden, Giles, Roberts, 
Marshman, and Manager VVhitlier. 

1924— Salman, Barrows, Myrick 

1F25 — McCJeocb, Marx, 

The following members of the class of 
1923 were awarded their aMa: Bollli 
and Cohen. 



ADVANCE PRICE 



— ON 



RELAY RACE WITH WILLIAMS 
OPENS TRACK SEASON JAN. 20 



Other Dates on the Schedule Assure 
Keen Competition for M. A. C. 

A large number of Seniors and Jun- 
iors have reported to Coach Derby for 
indoor track, but the showing from the 



Kpsilon 
Theta Chi vs. Lambda Oh! 

Alpha 
Alpha Sigma Phi vs Alpha 
(.annua liho 
Jan. 29-Lambda (hi Alpha vs. Alpha 
(iamma Bho 
Kappa Sigma vs. Theta Chi 
Alpha BtgBta Phi vs. Sigma 

Phi Kpsilon 
Kappa (lamina Phi vs. Kappa 
Kpsilon 
Feb. 2-Cbampions of each group. 
Groups: Delta l'hi Alpha, Q. T. V.. 

Kappa Gamma Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Kappa Kpsilon. 

•i. Alpha Sigma Phi, Theta 

(hi. Lambda Chi Alpha. Kappa Sigma, 
Sigma Phi Kpsilon. Alpha (iamma Bho. 
Kach fraternity will race only with 
the other members ol its own group 
until the time of the run-off on Feb. 
2nd. There will be DO postponed 
races. The liisi race will be called at 4- 
80 r. m sharp with Coach Derby as re- 
tciee and starter. 



Dunhill Pipes 



JANUARY 15, 1923, 

Will be $10.00 and $12.00 



BUY NOW 



At $8.50 and $10 



Choice of a Career 

From the Yale News 



THE NINETY-FOUR 

Someone, probably an insurance 
agent, was quoted recently as saying 
that from the mass of one hundred 
college graduates one individual only 
rose to the Polo and butler class, peril- 
ously near the top of the financial lad- 
der. Five others became comfortably 
off and found themselves after twenty 
years at the small yacht and chauffeur 
stage. The other ninety-four presum- 
ably congregate in the great section of 
the American people who drive their 
own Buicks to the golf club. In other 
words, dreaming about being a rich 
man is one thing, and making the grade 
is "something else again." 

Yet the ninety-four presumably work 
just as hard as-the sumptuous six. Their 
business is the axis on which a small 
and uninteresting world revolves. They 
have become devotees of the dollar 
and when that fickle deity deserts, have 
nowhere else to turn. Jammed in a 
dull, straight rut of business they can 
never leave the road and jump the fence 
into finer fields of life. This, then, is 
the portion of ninety-four men out of 
every hundred now on the campus. 

The answer to the problem lies in 
the proper choice of a career. 



Between now and Commencement 
we shall have something to offer on 
the subject of "Careers." Watch for 
the space with the Famous Signature. 




CompanV 

op Boston. Massachusetts 



concert, those men not living near by 
were put up foi the algal by the towns- 
people, whose hospitality was greatly 
appreciated, 

The following algal the annual Al- 
umni Concert was given in the Swiss 
BOOBI at the t'oplev-l'la/.a. Due to the 
bad weather, the cloud that attended 

was not as large as it might otherwise 
have beaa. The program presented 
was practically the same as that of the 
preceding Bight. The audience was 
very appreciative. Bailing for encores 

repeatedly. They teemed to especially 

Snjoj the sour- ''Old Ring Cole,"' 
Fuller's clarinet solo, and Weal lie! wax 's 

skits. After the concert, daaeiag was 

enjoyed until twelve o'clock, various 

mem bars of the clubs taking turns 
furnishing i he music. 

Besides Manager. Bnow and assistant 
Manager Balden, the following men 
made the trip: arrlngton, Broderlok, 
Darling, Faneuf. Preat, Puller, Mold. 
Lambert, Loring, II. tforeross, B. (for- 
erose, Noyes, Paddock, Parsons, Sandow, 

Seals, Slailc. Tciiipleiou, Wade, W'ealh- 
erwax. Wendell. Williams and Wood. 

Tba following concerts have been ar 
raagod for i be near lutare i 

Jan. Hi lladley. 

\j Northampton. 
lit Block bridge Hall. 
•_'ii Bbelburne Falls. 

Feb. 1 Framinsihain Normal School. 

I Worcester Normal Bobool. 

|| Amherst Town Hall. 
Mar. Id Mi Hoi yoke College. 

PROM SHOW TRIALS 

Continued from p»ge 1 
The family \:ii lee its usual plans l>\ 

spending s quiet evening at home. 
Wilton's wife, Emmie, shows her battel 

side a! once by beginning lO economize 

Qeorge, who la engaged to Marguerite, 
Wilton's daughter, is replaced by bai 

ol he! -suitor, Clarence. Eddie, the son. 

axpraaeac bimsall as willinu to u<> to 

work St once. 

The maid, Alberline, sees Bafaain, 
who is an Italian portrait painter, go 
out with Emmie and suspects an elope- 
ment . 

When Wall Street learns of Ihefail- 
uie. stock in Walton's coin panics ;tii- 

medlately goes on sale for next to 
not blng. 

These are the Bttceessive calamities 

thai finally give way Eo successes which 
follow one another In rapid order and 

make the show an excellent one from 
the spectators' view point, as well a- 
calling tor ex pel lenced act mt 
Wilton and (Jonnora are called upon 

to show considerable skill. Du I as II 

Barle Weatberwaa and Robert f. Mart* 

in arc handling these parts there will 

lie nothing denied I lie audience tli.it 

experienced actors can produce. 

The part ol Kddie is siiii to bade* 
termined upon. 




We draw the line on part- 
cotton — 

Submit a sample piece of every 
cloth wc use to an "acid test " 

As lor workmanship, the best 
Custom tailor can't offrf liner — 

even .ti twice the prit e. 
Ro«khs Pkkt Com ram 

liroadway Herald Square 

at l'.lth Si. "Four at »6th St 

Convenient 
Broadway Cornen" Fifth Ave. 

it Warren at 4Ui Si. 

NEW VOItK CITY 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

'reamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to eat. 

MRS L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel. 41RW) Mad ley. Mans 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

('nine la ,'inil try your ken between » ihi a. M.. 
Dee, 4t|i.and K-.'tn v. Mi Dec. Hitti. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Thm Rex all Storm 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

We.h: 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by .' pp.) rt 
Open under ■ i e 

I' l» llo\l . \ 



Tel. 489 \V 



Prop. 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



DEUEL'S DRUQ STORE 



College Candy Kitchen 



m 



Don't^Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10, 1923. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COUEfilAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOAIU) OF EDITORS. 



liooms appear 10 be much better places 
f.n- miiiMs or even Ihe gymnasium in 
the Drill Hall is mote appropi iai .-. 
Let us keep a new edilice HM i» ap- 
pearance ea lung as possible by decent 
1 1 fun h and Intelligent reapeet. 



Ikvino W.Mi.ai.k '28 Rdttor-tM'taief 

I., rBU I'. AKKi.N.m.N *■ Mana«tn B Kdttor 
Gbossi i- Cm '<« '" 

Hi iPABI mini MiM'S : 



Editorial, 

Athletics, 

Academe I. 

Camps*! 



iBvma w. Ii m" "-' :| 

A I SB»T g. W II <IH 1* 

I.KWIH II. Kkii m "SB 

I.I MM K I!. AlOMM.H'N V 

JuHS <i. 1CK.au '-» 

(II VIM IH f. (MM I ii. .'It- "■ 
I'.MM.V <i. SMI I II "-'■• 

Kii. -ulty. Ki in M- W< '24 

AIiiimiiI. U KlIANCIs KKNNK.|.V"24 

Two v,. !ir . John M. Whittirii '28 

Kxchanut- anil 
r.Hiiiniini'-Htlnns.Sw I. COHM If 



BlIBINKHH DEPARTMENT. 
Owin K. roUOl '28 Business Manager 

Koi.kki K. Stkkiik '24 Advertising Manager 
CLirfOSOL. Bmum* "24 Circulation Manager 
Dosau) w. LnwialB David fctoaon "-'•• 

(UI.UKKT .1. llAl HSI.KK *» 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopiea, 10 cent*. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Maa*achuaette Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
aoriberB will please notify the businesa 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aa second class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Acifi>tP't for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for in section 1108. Act 
Of October. 1»17 authorized August 20. 1918. 



The Strenuous Life. 
Evidently Hume planning the winter 

schedule of homs with a maximum 
lime of ten minutes between classes 

were counting on a mild winter once 
again. Undoubtedly the Dean's office 

expect! each and every student 10 

arrive on time at elaaeroome, and la- 

lenda Ul penalize the failure to do so liy 
the usual half cut. 

For a week and a half we bavc been 
doing oar beet to ran from one end ol 

the spacious campus to the oilier with a 
biting gale sweeping across the walks 

and the ever increasing drifts of snow 

tending materially to hinder progress. 
So by the strenuous plocess of slipping 
•lldlagi »" d irottlug from place to 
place we have managed to drop Into 
our seats as the final bell rings (when 
it does at all). Perhaps track practice 
la good between classes, perhaps the 

fear of being pal <»n probation tor over- 

cutting has no terrors for the majority 
who walk in late, nevertheless we 
Strongly petition for ■ fifteen minute 
interval between classes on the basis of 
necessity rather than privilege. 



HOCKEY SEASON STARTS 

Continued from page 1 

Since the Christmas vacation the learn 
baa been worklni doubly hard, In prep- 
aration tor the Lame next Thursday 
with D.i si. >n Cniversity at Doston. This 
will be the lirst name oi a ditlieiill sched- 
ule and it is hoped that a win will mail 

the beginning of a promising season. 
in the practice game Saturday morn* 

log between teams A and P. fast passing 
and quick sure shooting on the part of 
team A made it possible for them to 
easily deleat their opponents. 

Little is known of the B. U. team, as 

this is i heir lirst attempt to put a hockey 
team en the ice. They are to be re- 
spected, however, as in their game with 
Harvard they were only defeated 2-0. 
They have been practicing daily at the 
Arena, and should lurnish strong oppo- 
sition for the Aggie Sextet. 

The probable lineup tor ihe It. U. 

gamete: Captain Gordon, lw; Whita- 
ker or Hilyard, c; Lamb or Sieoll.rw; 
(oddsmith. nl; Hudson of Tewhill. Id; 

Alger or Baker, goal. 



Town Hall, Amherst 
Wedn'day 



Mat 3. KTC. 
6-45.8-30 



Extra Day. Thursday Prices 
"THE QUEEN OF SHEBA" 

in reels, with Betty Blythe as 
siiclia and Fritz Lieber as 
Kinii Solomon. 
Fox News Mutt and Jeff 



„,. , The greatest satire in the hls- 

ThursdaV . t...y of literature. 

' "A Connecticut Yankee in 
Kins Arthur's Court," 

Mat. 3, Kve. by Mai k Twain. 

6-45,8-30 Fun From the Preif. Comedy 

Marion Davie* and Forrest 

Stanley in "THE YOUNG 

DIANA." 

from Marie Corelli's popular 

novel, elaborate)! plctnrtaed 
Sport Review 

Lloyd Hamilton in "The 
Speeder" 



Friday 



Mat 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



FOUR MORE SOPHOMORES 
ELECTED TO THE COLLEGIAN 



o i J I Dorothy Dal ton, David 
Saturday Powell and Mitchell Lewis 
in "THE SIREN CALL" 

A KIWI and forceful epic of 

the Northwest. 
News. I i 1 Mermaid Comedy 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



.- . zane Hrey's "THE LOST 

Monday TRAIL." with Eva Novaa. 

Action in volumes anil ivei 
increasing suspense. 

Mat. 3, Kve. Screen Snapshots 
6-45, 8-30 I i« el Sunshine Comedy 



Save the Memorial Hall. 
Immediately preceding the Chriat- 

mas recess and at regular intervals, so 
it seems, the Memorial Hall is being 
subjected tO I -erics of inexcusable 

ehaatisements, needless as well as dero- 
gatory tO thti emblem of respect and 
devottoa to aggie men who made the 
supreme sacrilice in the World War, Wy- 
the Kxtension workers of the slate in 

their gatherings el tha college. The 

upper hall is made a playground, nod 
sanies of the noisiest and most unre- 
strained type are executed in a manner 
ol indiscretion. Daces and the scurry- 
ing of multitudinous feet fairly shake 
the boildlng on its firm foundation. 
The very timbers creak and groan un- 
der I he strain of t be riot which would 
be too much tor any plastered ceiling. 
Why not attempt to dlaoover the num- 
ber of such treatments required tfl Ret 
the Memorial Balldlttg la the same 
condition as North College with scarred 
and scathed woodwork, scratched and 
maltreated floors, and gOOged walls! 
Evidently someone should commence 
an account book as soon as possible 
With carefully ruled columns and 
plenty of pagea, and compile the dis- 
graceful record. 

A feeling of exasperation and Indig- 
nation tills Ihe sludent who enters 

daring the course of the rampage. Be 
is noi granted the same prlvlledge and 

truthfully has no desire tor the privi- 
lege. Diagoal that be is power- 
|«m to bring the diaturbanoe to a close 
tahea poaaeaaloa of him. The only al- 
ternative is to get away from the 
bnilding and veat his emotions in an 
opinion of the Kxtension Services" 
methods of diversion. 

We do not object to sport at tee right 
time and in the right place, in fad it is 
none of our business what the former 
teachers do lot their personal enter- 
tainment While in Amherst, bill we 

question the adaptability of Memorial 

Hall for any such practices as this 
branch of the college educational staff 
has indulged in. The old Social Union 



It looks as though the Scholarship 

Committee could not control He aplriti 

any more than the Federal Prohibition 
agents. 



IN HONOR OF AN AVERAGE MAN 

The following article is reprinted from 
1 1, litorial column of a recent issue «>t 

the Beaton Herald:— 

"In college he had an average standing 
Of U pluB, but be failed to make Phi 
Beta Kappa. 

(in the gridiron he played four years 
with the scrubs, but he did not make 
the varsity. 

In the college he took part in all the 
important student activities, but he 
never was president ol a club. 

The war with Spain came while he 
was still in college; he volunteered. 
He took a postgraduaie degree in medi- 
cine and entered (be medical corps of 
the United States army. In the world 
war he went to the aid of a wounded 
man and was killed. He was awarded 
the croix da guerre after his death. 

To this man, (apt. David Thomas 
Hanson, Northwestern University un- 
veiled a tablet a few weeks ago. In his 
tribute to this line and faithful charac- 
ter the president of the university made 
the poleta recited above, how Hanson 
played football year after year without 
ever healing his name at the end of a 
college cheer, how be "plugged away - ' 
at his studies without ever receiving a 
"high stand' - award, how he simply did 
his duty always and everywhere. 

He was an excellent example of the 
average man. There are a multitude of 
such men in this country. We respect 
them. We love them, just as Hanson 
was reepected by his associates, "gener- 
ous, persistent, self-sacrilieing. ' If 
they get few .beers fortunately they do 
not look for cheers. They are average 
men; they are the firm foundation for 
our achievement as a nation. Think a 
moment OTOt the signiticance of these 
lines placed at the bottom of Hansons 
tablet by the alumni of his university: 
"He played four years on the scrub- 
he never quit." 



Two New Members in Both(Literary 

and BusinesB Department8 will 

Materially Strengthen the Board. 

At a meeting of both departments of 
Ihe Coil I '.IAN Hoard Monday evening 

in the Com. m.ian ntli.e. four members 
Of the Sophomore class were elected to 
the Hoard as a result of last term's com- 
petition. The new members are: In 
the Literary Department — George I* 
Church of Dorchester and Miss Emily 
li. Smith Of I. real Harrington ; and in 
the Bnalneaa Department David Mo.x- 

,,„, of Holyoke, and Gilbert J. Baeuea- 

ler of Springfield. The Hoard decided 

to hold a < oi.i.ii.i vn banquet la tin- 
near future. 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing mnd Printing 

Hills Studio Phone 456-R 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Stiidlo-MASONH HI."* h ■« thaiiipton. 

(luh Mtfht Pnaice nnwlai wl,h - M - A ( • M,> " 
Private Lessans by Appointment 

TeJapkoM sal Nortaamaeoa 



LANDSCAPERS ADDRESSED BY 
MR. RODGERS LAST WEEK 



Water Coloring is Subject of Talk to 

Group of About Twenty-five. 

Refreshments Served. 

A good enthusiastic meeting of the 
Landscape Club took place last Wed- 
nesday evening in French Hall, with 
about twenty-five present, representing 
the four (lasses and the Short Course. 
Koland W. Bodgera of the Horticul- 
ture Department spoke to the group on 
Water Coloring, and gave some inter- 
esting points in the first study of this 
fascinating branch of art. 

This information is of real practical 
value to the men as they do not get 
anything oil Waier Coloring in the reg- 
ular courses. Mr. Uodgers promised to 

U o more deeply Into tha subject if 

arrangements could be made for some 
future date. 

A short business meeting preceded 
the talk, at which plana for future 

meetings were discussed, also plans for 
more activity 00 the campus and some 

form of conical with the other major 

(dubs. After the talk Mr. Kodgers 
exhibited some of Die painting he has 

done recently. Befreebraenta of Ice 

Cteam and cake closed the meeting. 

CbompsotTsOmdP Calks 

We can eqatfj vihi with the following: Skis. 
Ski Poles, ski Wax, BBowsnoes, Skates, shoes. 
Pucks, Hockei sticks, and shin Guards. 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

A Distinctive Industry 

There is not anothet industry doollag 
with so delicate a product, requiring so 
much care to handle where lack of ai- 
tention means so much loss, as in the 
dairy industsv . 

Nor is there an industry where such 
careful provision against loss of quality 
has been made as tin; safe, distinctive, 
sweet, wholesome, sanitary cleanlin- - 
so thoroughly and easily supplied by 



the use of 

Among other things the use of tb I 
(leaner entirely removes from dairy 
equipment and processes the cause ol 
Baby, metallic and oily tlavois to milk 
products. It is itself entirely free from 
grease, will not produce a greasy suds. 
and cleans so thoroughly and rinse 
freely that all sour and stale odors UN 
completely removed from the plant and 
equipment. 

An order on your supply house I 
definite step to higher scoring product-. 

I mlian in 
circle 



It cleans clean. 




THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturer 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10, 1*23. 




TKUT1I SPREADS BY TESTIMONY 
#9"HBRE in a sort of high < ouipiilsion which lofty spirit* recognize to henr 
^■a* witness to truth whereever found. That is how good standard merchan- 
dise gets world-wide distribution. If ymi have already had the pleasure and 
satisfaction of our Atkinson Poplin and Welch-MarBetson Foulard Tics, won't 
you spread the news of your discovery to others whom you wish to enrich? 

CONSULT TOM 







Campus News 



NORTH DAKOTA DEBATE 

Continued from page 1 



that tht national government has no 
right to Interfere. The bill would un- 
dermine the rights of (he states and la 

causing antagonism throughout the 
country, it simply provides another 

chance for the national government to 
assume control, laical control is at 
sary unless we are to have a Continen- 
tal government. The needs ol better 
educational opportunities are great, 
but the slates are awake to them, so 
the bill is not needed. The slales are 

offering opportunity for study, ami no 

thing more can be done without com 
pulsion; the bill does not provide for 
that, so is not needed 

In the exchange of rebuttals, ihe 

affirmative brought out the fact thai 
each slate lan accept ol refuse the bill. 

I lie bill states definitely thai the 

Secretary shall not control, but each 
slate for Iteelf. The Department of 
Kducatiou has gldg.OOO to use. and 
uses .>7.">,IIIHI for salaries, while over 
>:t:!l,tMM» is uVeil for education in 
Alaska. The bill says that Ihe Secre- 
tary controls, except where laws coi\flicl 
with the bill. The negative feared that 
we cannot tell what Jaws Congress 
might pass, imposing new conditions, 
alter the bill bad been accepted, but 
the affirmative answered this. 

The judges were Prof. Kay E, Toin\ 
ol M. A. <'., Mr. Hayes Robbtna ol Am 
lierst. and Mr. Harry B. Harlow of Am- 
herst, and awarded the decision to 
North Dakota by vote of 2 to 1 The 
debate was well attended and til 
hard-fought. Mr. Stiirlangson said 

afterward, "It woe one of tbe beat dc 

bates I have been in, because we had to 
light all the time. |t was certainly 
worth while." 



INITIATION BANQUET HELD 
BY DELTA PHI GAMMA MONDAY. 



Work For The Coming Year Out- 
lined By The Girls, and a Short 
Talk Given By Miss Skinner. 

Monday evening the girls society, 
Delta Phi Gamma, held iis initiation 
banquet in Draper Hall. The petty in- 
itiation took place Saturday evening, 
nid the formal initiation was held im- 
llately before the banquet, 20 girls 
nne members. Miss Skinner, MU> 

— man and Mrs. Hicks were present. 
The banquet table was prettily dec- 

Mtod in green and white, and the 

vinous courses carried out the same 

•rs. 

following the banquet, the chairmen 

ol the three clubs which are included 

'i e society told of the work of theii 

ictilar group. Kmily Smith '2">, 

«• of the Athletic Club. Martha 

- '24, described the Literary Club. 

Eleanor Batemaa '-'■'>. told about 
Music Club. Next Monday each 

man will pledge one group and its 
will be her especial interest as a 
tier of Delta Phi Gumma. 
Skinner spoke of the three l's 



of the society, shs outlined the pur- 
poae, and urged the member! to con- 
sider membership as being an especial 
privilege, through, wlo.se ass. ,ci a I ions 
would come I he power of belonging to 

and working with the Halted group, 

The society song "The Evening 
Hymn" by Mae Holden Wheeler Hi, 
v\as sung ai the clsoe oi the banquet. 

Mrs. Marie B. Marsh has returned to 

bar datiea as house mother at i be 

abtgall idanta house alter her illness. 



CHARLES J. TEWHILL 1924 
PROM COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

The Junior l'rom committee was 

eleotad at a Junior elaee meeting held 

tbe last part of last term, and is com- 
posed ol Charles .1. 'I'ewbill of Kloreme, 
chairman; Alfred 1*. Gay ol GrotOa, 

Biehard 8. Gltford of South vTeetport, 
Sterling afyrtek of LoBgmeadow,Arthnr 

C Nleol! of Quiney, James .1. Williams 

Of Sunderland and Robert II. Wood- 
worth of Newton. 



FRESHMEN 34, GREENFIELD 

19, IN THEIR FIRST GAME 

The yearling quintet easily defeated 

tbe Greenfield High School boopetera 
here last Saturday with a score of B4-19, 

The freshmen showed unusually good 
form for so early in Ihe season and a 
successful season seems to be before 
them. Temple starred for the froafa 
while Porteahelmer, the viHiling for- 
ward, played well for the opponents. 



<x4 LAJVGLEYS FIRST 




-J> 



MODEL IN FLIGHT /-o 



-* 



"The way of an Eagle in the air" 




CENTURY after century 
men broke their necks 
trying to fly. They had 
not troubled to discover 

what Solomon called "the way of 

an eagle in the air." 

In 1 89 1 came Samuel Pierpont 
Langley, secretary of the Smith- 
sonian Institution. He wanted 
facts. His first step was to whirl 
flat surfaces in the air, to measure 
the air pressures required to sus- 
tain these surfaces in motion and 
to study the swirls and currents of 
the air itself. Finally, in 1896, he 
built a small steam-driven model 
which flew three-quarters of a 
mile. 

With a Congressional appro- 
priation of $50,000 Langley built 
a large man-carrying machine. Be- 
cause it was improperly launched, 
it dropped into the Potomac River. 
Years later, Glenn Curtiss flew it 
at Hammondsport, New York. 

Congress regarded Langlcy*s 
attempt not as a scientific experi- 
ment but as a sad fiasco and 



refused to encourage him further. 
He died a disappointed man. 

Langley's scientific study which 
ultimately gave us the airplane 
seemed unimportant in 1896. 
Whole newspaper pages were given 
up to the sixteen-to-one ratio of 
silver to gold. 

*'Sixteen-to-one M is dead polit- 
ically. Thousands of airplanes 
cleave the air — airplanes built 
with the knowledge that Langley 
acquired. 

In this work the Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company 
played their part. They aided in 
developing the "supercharger," 
whereby an engine may be sup- 
plied with the air that it needs for 
combustion at altitudes of four 
miles and more. Getting the facts 
first, the Langley method, made 
the achievement possible. 

What is expedient or important 
today may be forgotten tomorrow. 
The spirit of scientific research 
and its achievements endure. 



■ 



General^Elecflric 

general Office COmp^Iiy Schenectady.N.T 



9SW> 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10, 1»23. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January? 10, 1923. 



AGGIE REVUE MAKES HIT 

BEFORE LARGE AUDIENCE 



Freshmen do Well in Production of 

"J. Ceasar." Emery '24 Proves 

the Hit of the Evening. 



George Emery ^ added ■ meat deal 
totfaa sojoymsat of the evening by bli 
clever stunts between the acts. His 

imitations of '•Daddy" Giobeekei I 

Swiss Yoddi.'i-s brought pleaasal Bern- 

ories hack to I be »Udience and f in nislird 

much merriment, 



Faculty 



DR. LINDSEY HONORED AT 
SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTY 



The Third Annua! Aggie Ucvue was 

I,,.!,! befow a record erowd la Bowker 

Auditorium on the evening oi Dcccm- 

ber l".. The Revue included a buries- 

,,,„. |,y I he .lass ol 'i6, two one-act 

plays bj tbe Boleter Bolsters, and a 

musical Dumber. 
Tin- first act of the entertainment was 

'■J. Cieear" written an.l directed by 
Stephen V. Harii- of the .-la--..-! '86. 
Thie aci was a l.iirles M ue of Shakes- 
prate's great play "Julius Ca*ar" and 
dren meny i leugb from the audience. 
The eel depicted tbe four principle 

srencs. that of the meeting of the con- 
spirators, the killing of Ca-sar. the ap- 
pearance of I he gbost, an.l the death of 
I he conspirators. The scanty costume- 
of the actors and I heir athletic physique 
eave the whole act a distinctly Woman 
atmosphere. The manner in which the 

scenes were changed without drawing 

the curtain gave a hint of the methods 

,,i olden theatrical ways. Elmer Bar- 
ber took tbe part of Carnal '•» t-"»»<i *'>!.■ 

and Harris made a line "Bratue." -I • 

j. Grant with a long How of ■peecn was 

;l good counterpart of that hrilliant 
•'.Mark Anthony.'" 

Tin' east inelnded : 
Julius < Rtear 



TWO-YEAR RECEPTION TO 

WINTER COURSE STUDENTS 



Unit us 
Mark Antony 

< laealne 

< 'aerie 

Tiehonitls 

Lucius 

Hirst Btage Hand 

Second Btage Hand 



Elmer E. Barber 

Stephen ¥, Harris 

Theodore .1. Grant 

Ralph N- Hart 

Herbert Mndekog 

James E Kurnhain 

Stewart Anthony 

K. lhoma- Murphy 

Robert w Burrell 



Last Wednesday evening the mem- 
bers of the two-year class t-ave, their 
annual reception to the winter term 
students. The meeting was held in 
Memorial Building and the evening wee 

Occupied with dancine ; a good chance 
being given for all those in the short 
course to meet one another. Mr. and 

Mrs. Banna, Prof, and Mrs. Pbelan, 

Miss Hamlin, an.l Mrs. Brlg*S were the 
patrons and patronesses. 

Plane are now underway for the form- 
ulation of a program to he carried out 
in regard to summer school, which will 
start soon after the regular college term 

closes, it has been definitely decided 

that the eel 1 will open on July 2 sad 

Continue lor four weeks. 

The following men are new members 
of the two-year Freshman class, having 
transferred from the regular four-year 
class of 1998: Sydney Parsons, Abbot 
BTOWaeli, John Bogere, and Arnold 
/inn. 

Earls Erawley of New Bedford and 
Frederick Toller of lledford Hillside. 

are newly added memheis of the two- 
year course. 



Seventy Guests Present to Share 
the Big Birthday Cake. 

The friends of Dr. I.in.lsey nave him 
a surprise party in honor of his (tilth 

birthday last Friday evening in Draper 
Hall. All the membere ot IheXzprri- 
men! station stall, and all the membere 

of the (hemistry Department w<mi'|' res- 
ent, making a group of about TO. 

A banquet was served at 7 P. K. Di- 
rector Haskell introduced l'rof. Kred 
Morse who acted as toast master during 

the evening. 

among the i peak ere was Henry Baa- 
bine Wbo gave an account of the people 
who have been connected with the Ex- 
periment Station. Dr. Chamberlain 
spoke, an.l l>i Walker j-ave his early 
recollection; of the campus. Mrs. I.in.l- 
sey told of how ii feels to he the wife of 
a successful man at 60, and Dr. Lindsay 
gave a speech in appreciation ot the 
surprise parly. 

Old-tin. e aongtwere Mag by the com- 
pany, for which Mis. Harebell played 

the piano. 

A very large h'uihday rake was cut 
into 70 pieces and each euest had a 
portion. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1923 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - Ma88 

Drury s Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTHrury 

io Main Street. 



'The Medicine bbow" by Stuart 
Walker was ihe lirst act put on by the 

Roister Doisters. Tbe scene of this act 

is laid on the edge of a pier ol one of 
Ihe little towns along t he Mississippi. 

"Lut 'er," the vl liege lasj man, appears 

onlhescenc slovenly dressed, tobacco 
juice running down his chin, and drag- 
lag a home made lish pole behind him. 
Aiter some difficulty in adjusting him- 
self to a comfortable position, he is 
joined by "t.i/." a younger hut equally 

Bolvenly companion who bss the habit 

of spitting and then wiping his mouth 

rigorously on hi- sleeve. 1'endexler 
joins then, presently ami there follows 
an aruument on the merits of kerosene 
as a medicine. 

The interest or this play lay not in 
the plot or ■peaking part, but in the 
actions of the characters and the setting. 

The cast wa- composed of: 
(ii/ .lames s. Kilbourne '24 

I,, u 'er H. Karle Weal he: wax '24 

Peodextei Cleoa B. Johnson '88 

Sober! Fuller and his quintet of sax- 
ophone players put <>" a line musical 
act. playing some catchy variations ol 
popular numbers. Kenneth Loring 
played an excellent violin solo with 

Richard Wendell as aeeopmantet. 
The saxophone quintet was composed 
of Robert Puller '88, Stewart Anthony 
»g8, sumner Fairbanks '88, < bartes 

Wheeler 2-year, and Join. Coukliii 2 yr. 

•'A Maker of Dreams" by Oliphant 

Dawn was cleverly put on by members 

ot the Roister DolSters. Pierrette and 

Pterrat, as street •logers In business to- 
gether, were well played by Frances 
Martin '88 and Carrol Towne '2:5 respec- 
tively. Tb« part of the old manufact- 
urer was very well done by Robert Mar- 
tin '2:5. 



THE FLOYDS-MAGICIANS PRO- 
GRAM FOR FRIDAY, JAN. 12 

The social Union is npholdlog its rep- 
utation i«»r obtaining Brat class per- 
formances by securing for Friday svee- 

log Jan. 12. at ti-:$t>. the Floyd Magi- 
cians, the "world-famous conjurors who 
are never at a loss for new tricks." 

From the depths of their bag of en- 
joyment they have consistently drawn 
dicks which have called forth such 
terms of praise for Floyd as "peerless 
prince of magical entertainers," '•su- 
preme monarch of up-to-date magi- 
cians," "a modern dtselp'e of Mcpbls- 
topheles," etc., an.l these from such 

reputable sources that their worth can- 
not be doubled. 

The •tamping groqnd of this party is 

the whole United Stales, Mexico and 
Canada, and Ihey have won hearty ap- 
proval in the four corners of the 
continent. 

They possess a repetoire which in- 
cludes manipulation of cards, coins, 
handkerchiefs, etc.. mind-readinu', 
mental telepathy and original illusions 
by Floyd himself. 

The style of their performance Is char- 
acterized by smoothness, refinement, 
originality and baffling artifices which 

provoke ripples of mystified laughter 
from the audience however jaded their 

uiste may he by t he t hi ills of modern 
vaudeville. 

Professor Floyd himself is a past mas- 
ter at the art of conjury and all that the 
w.ud sueyests, hut that is not all for he 
is supported b| "Mahala," the mind- 
reader, an.l C F. Mabel musical director 
for the act. 

It is suggested by i he) management 



PRESIDENT BUTTERF1ELD 

ENTERTAINS HARVEST CLUB 

The Franklin Harvest duh was en- 
tertained at Draper Hall last week by 
President and Mrs. r.utterlield, who are 

members. 

This Club consists ol ahoiit 20 mem- 
bers, men and their wives, and meets 
every two weeks at the home of some of 
its memben somewhere In the Valley. 



"THE FARMER'S BOOKSHELF" 
BY PRESIDENT BUTTERF1ELD 



President liuttertieltl is editor of a 
new series of hooks for farmers entitled 

••The Farmer's Bookshelf." Five I ks 

have already heen puhlishe.l, and as 
many more are underway, Including 
some by members of our faculty. Har- 
OOUrt, Brace and Company of New 
York are publish log the series. 

Hooks already published an.l shortly 
to ne published include: 
••The Agricultural Bloc," by Senator 

Arthur Cappen. 
'•The County Agent and the Farm 

liureaii." bj Maurice Hurrit. 
"The Grange Master an.l the Grange 

Lecturer," by .Jennie Buell. 
"The Farmerand the Labor Movement . 

by Hayes Bobbins. 

"Ihe Farmer and the World's Food," 

by A. E. Cance. 
"Ihe Farm Movement in Canada," by 

N. 1'. Lambert. 
'Our Soil Wealth,' - by J. 6. Lipman. 
"The Farmer and His Community .'" 

by Dwigbt Sanderson. 

"Country Planning," by F. A. Waugh. 

The publisher says lhat the purpose 

of the Parmer's Bookshelf is to bring 

out a series of hooks mainly on economic 
and social questions lhat will reach 
reading, thoughtful farmers and rural 
leaders. 



"PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

An- rioinineiit AflMMB tlie 

ramose Makse We restate 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

H ;. L'...»l Milne for «' '» wl »" wa,lt ,l "' ■** 

there is m sscemleesstoektasi test Ml 

will lit the ankles liiinly. 

G. EDWARD FISHER 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prompt* done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



After Every 
Meal 



it* 



•<? 



>0* 



fl* 



that any concealing dark secrets absent 
themselves from the entertainment as 
it might prove embarrassing if Mahala 
should pick theiM'as a suhjeet for her 
supernatural powers hut all others will 
do well Io alien. I and may feel assured 

of a full evening of merriment, melody 
and mystification. 



SENATE ENTERTAINED BY 

PREXY INFORMALLY 
President Huttertield entertained 

the members of the Senate last week. 
An informal reception was held and dis- 
cission of college affairs undertaken. 
Cider and doughnuts were served. 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



SOPHOMORES ! 

Get your Agricultural Economics 26 Supplies 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



ABELE 'at, Manager 



RICHARDSON '23 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirst class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

T. S. PEKINS 

Suiti made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 

Raincoat* 
Holts Pressed SSc KUMtn ISHorfaw 



WEATHERWAX »ad 



DIMOCK • 1 



<>\ U ADAMS 111:1 <; BTORJt 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Repairing While U Walt 

NKW PRICKS 
Mens wiini.- Botes. Robber iieein . . $2.50 
Men's Half Sole*. KubberHeeli . . . $1.75 
Men's Robber Holes. Robber Heeli $2.25 

Men's Half Botes $1.35 

Work OUHiailt.'.-.l-AMHKKST HOI SK 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

1 ii:iirH and Cigarettes H ite. pries per carton 

on Clearstti 
Si'hratTt's < hocilateH an.l other leadiim lines 
Cracker* and Canned Good* 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 
Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, sai nrdaj . 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Kridav. 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P.M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

IT'SA HAPPY FEELINCJSN'TIT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Boirland B, French s/bo was graduate 
assletant in ihe Department of Chen- 

istrj l..r Ihe last Iwn years an.l who re- 
ceived Ihe degree ot Master of Setenee 
in Jane, lias aeeepted a position as 

eheinisl wiih ihe linreaii ..I Animal 

Nutrition at Btate College, Peaasyl* 
raaia. 

John B. Siniih win. was employed in 
ihe Kee.i Control Laboratory of the Ex- 
periment Station foraome two years and 
wh.. f..r several years has heen employ. 
e.l as chemist at iiie Texas Experiment 
Station, has seeepied a position laths 
Cbemieal Laboraturj oj ihe Rhode 
Island Bxperlmenl Station, liritailtb 
will have obarge of tbe entire eootrol 
work in i hat laboratory . 



MR. WARD'S CROUP 

This lei in Mr. Want's discussion group 
will lake ii|> anew line of enquiry— 

''Some <>t the Immediate Problems oi 

Life.'' They will meet this Thursday 
at 8:80 i'. m., ihe subject to he "Ihe 
Ifeanlnf Ol God," in the Memorial Hall. 



NOTE 

Harry H. Springer was icceinly 

eleeted by ths Tiro-year elans to ihe po- 
sition oi huaiaeee manager .>t the year 

book "Ihe Short-Horn, which Ihe short 
course people are editing this year. 

.John Armstrong was ebosen the 
editor-in-chief of the publication. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
Vegetable Gardening The Lean-to 
Greenhouse used by the Vegetable Gar- 
denlng Department, which eras built for 

a greperj in 1808 and '1W, has he.n 

. oinpieieiv repainted and reglased. 
After :;n years ot constant use most of 

Ihe woo.l work was found to he sound. 

This greenhouse is pictured la Tali's 
Greae bouse Management published in 

1806 SSS typical lean-to lettuce house 
Of lhat kind. 

l'rof. II. I-'. Tompsoe, Ilea. 1 ol Ihe lie 

paiinicni oi Vcg table Gardening and 
Director of the Market Garden Field 
Station ai Lexington, was in Buffalo, 
N. Y. Monde) an. I Tuesday, Dee. II 
and 12. io attend the executive coin 
mlttee meeting of the Vegetable Groa 

eis Aesocialion of America of which 

he is president. Prom Buffalo he wenl 

to Cleveland where he conferie.i will. 

ihe Cleveland vegetable growers tin 



some iii their msrket problems. 1'iof. 
Tompson will he in rIarrlsburg,l'a.,Jan, 

M, while he will speak al Ihe a 10)1 

meeting of ihe Btate Agricultural aud 
Horticultural Society on ihe subject 
"The Improvement of Wasbiagton \s 

paragua end Rxperl ital Methods ol 

Vegetable Gardening." 

several Seniors are ibis term taking 
up the study oi vegetable forcing. The 
Boston vegetable forcing diet riel is ihe 
largeel such diet riel in ihe United 

States and Ihe only district which is 

successful!) growing bead lettuce under 
gtsss. 



A joint committee "i facult) ami sin 

ileitis at N. II State College, named to 

consider winter spoils, has rec • 

mended tbe expenditure ofgl.000 i 

ski jump and skating rink, ihe srec 
l ion oi a hi ; \ fool tower with concrete 
piers mi a site a mile and a hall lloin 

the campus, io enable jumper*, to make 

I I'll feel , is I (■ciilii llieu.led. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 

Amherst Book Store 



SlXliQNlM 



1924 INDEX NOTICE 
The following featuree for ihe 19M 

Index will he taken al Mi Ha' Studio, 
next Sun. lay morning : 

Ki:t(i Kappa Gamma Bbo. 

10-40 Phi Sigma Kappa. 

12-00 Alpha Get a ftho. 

Il-lfi Alpha Sigma Phi. 



)y- 



"CARNATION NIGHT" TO 

BE HELD IN FEBRUARY 

The H.dyoke and Northampton Flo- 
rists' sad Gardners 1 Club in conjunc- 
tion with the M. A. C. Floriculture 
Club will hold a ''Carnation Might' 1 
here at M. A. C. sometime in February. 
There will lie an exhihit and talks 
given by outside speakers. Il is hoped 
that Mr. S. .1. (milliard of Prauiiegbam 
and Mr. Charles Stioiil of Biddeford, 
Me., will lie present Io give talks. 



Just received a new 

Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal 
Paper, called "The Dyplomatic." 

See our window. 



C. F. DYER 



WINTER COURSE TO HAVE 

SEVERAL NEW COURSES 
The Ten-weeks 1 vYintei School which 

opened the lirsi ol I his lei m and con- 
tinues until March 10 is to have several 
new courses of study on its program. 

A course in nursery practice is I. cine 

offered for Ihe benefit of young men 

Wbo have had practical experience in 
nursery work and who are ambitions to 
learn more in I bat field, 

Several oourses are aleo to be offered 
dealing with different phases of the 
dairying industry, such as milk testing, 
ice ereem making, and the like. The 

courses, of which there are four in num- 
bers, are gtvea at different periods 
throughout the term, hut arranged so 

that the student may lake Ihe entire 
group by Spending the whole term at 
the work. 



Saving of 2b% to 40?i on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

Il you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery jnsi come 
into our store and ask ua to show you whatevei you ma} I 
interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per (.t-nt., we don'l want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 
basis. U. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied <>i vour shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices an- .is 

follows : 
Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed. 
Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 
Men's half soles with robber heels, sewed. 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50.1s per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are Goodyear welt. 

AjMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



$2.25 
1 .70 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MDTDAL PLDMBIN6 & HEATING CO, 

The Winchester Store 















The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 10. 1923. 



20 PER CENT DISCOUNT 

During this week we are offering our Annual January Clearance Sale previous to the arrival of our Spring /m«. 

SSSFour niece Norfolk., $42.50. $45 Sack Suits, $33.50. 20 per cent discount on all Neckwear, Coif Hose, 
$55 tour-piece lvorruina, *-*'"*'" v ^ n mxeeUmnt oP portumty to ««# «• 

Half-hose, Fancy Vests and Sweaters. $7.50 Dobbs Hats, $6.00. $6.50 Dobbs Hats, $5.00. Qaainted » *—.■. E- i» 



SOUTHW/CK BROS. & GAULT 



FRESHMAN AGRICULTURE TO 
FILL A LONG-FELT NEED 



Will Give Entering Men a General 

View of the Field of Agriculture. 

Taught by Mr. Redman. 

For the first time in agricultural col- 
lege history, Freshmen are working in 
a course that will undertake to present 
to them the whole held of agriculture, 
its social anil economic condition, Us 
relation toother industry, and the op- 
portunities and limiting factors of the 
various branches of fanning. 

"It answers a 10 year debate we have 
dad as to what we should teach Fresh- 
men |« agriculture," President Kenyon 
L liulterlleld declared in introducing 
the Freshman class to their new study. 
'•We have for ten years taught apicul- 
ture to the first year class, hut 11 lias 
heen taught by departments in dabs 
and patches, not always in right per- 
spective, ami with something left out. 
Now we are undertaking to give you 
Freshmen a knowledge of the problems 
the farmer is up against all along the 
way — in growing his crops, in market- 
ing them, in living in his community — 
so that when you come back as Sopho- 
mores you will know what agriculture 

is. 

"Whether you become farmers or not, 
you ought to have an intimate ac- 
quaintance with one of the most im- 
portant of our national problems. If 
you work in industry you are going to 
need a knowledge of the foundation in- 
dustry—agriculture. And many of you 
will work in fields that relate directly 
to agriculture. We cannot spend time 
this term to give you a course of agri- 
cultural history, or of marketing, or of 
farm management, or of economics. 
All these you must take in your later 
courses. But we shall give you a tele- 



ABIGA1L ADAMS NOTES 

Tlie S. C. S. gave a supper in hoiiorof 
the women enrolled in the fen Weeks 
Course last Sunday evening la th« Abi- 
gail Adams House. Miss Skinner, Miss 
Hamlin, and Mrs. liriggs were guests. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itsrli. 



Mrs. Charlotte Barrett Ware, one of 
the women who has heen most interested 
in the welfare 01 the women students, 
was a guest at the doiniloiy last Friday 
evening. She gave an illustrated talk 
..ii her visit to Italy last spring as a del- 
egate tothe International Institute of 
Agriculture in Koine. Mss. Ware is the 
second woman ever sent to the Institute 
as a delegate by any country. 

EXPERIMENT STATION 

In place of the regular station semi- 
nar for the week of Monday, Jan. tf. the 
experiment station has arranged for a 
series of lectures on statistical methods 
in elevating experimental work by l>r. 
H. H. Iajvc of Cornell University. 
These lectures are to be given daily 
from Monday to Friday, inclusive, at 

,- D I0S Slockhridge Hall, and an 

opend to any institutional staff members 
on registration with the State Director. 
Dr. Love will make himself available 
during the morning hours Ibis week on 
any relevant work. A ppoint uienls may 
be made direct with Dr. Love of 
through the station often. 

BOTANY DEPT. RECEIVES 
SPECIMENS FROMDEGENER '22 

The Botanical Department has just 
received from Mr. Otto DegOBOf *M a 

consignment of valuable herbarium 
specimens. Part of these were col- 
lected in the Canadian Northwest, part 
iu (he Hawaiian Islands where Mr. 
Degener is now doing graduate work. 
In the collection from the Northwest 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASS1N 

•ELECT CATERING 

at gaaanotilr Prices. 
Informal* a Specially 

ISBO, Prospect St., Amherst. M I 

Tel. BOOM 



Fine Groceries 

Candies and Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



S. S. HYDE 

Optloloin »»ii<t j *■>%■*- *»»*»■* 

I Pleasant Street tnixme (Unlit 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Kltf lien Alarm CkH k* and other Ueliahle Makes 

Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

r.u> poarprewtM Mcaal f'<"» «.«•■•«•*■ 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all tin 

umnri tatoaa. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Morn* Bros. Neckwear 

Order vour B«Xl Suit M OtMMsl hen- now. 

Baal saloctlonaof Woolens In the lataet pat 
Krn.alway.on hand. The hwrh .mallt* '•'<•»' 
work is apparent on fan<> gameM. rr> us. 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdasher. 
ii \mit>st. Meat to Ww fr n Patea TmU Oalce 



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THE 



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INCoki-oKA'I Kl> 

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Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



courses. nut we snan R'") 1 """"' „i„., imprfMiinu 

people view through the eountry of ag- are many .pec... -now. g re s ng 

. . ._ ......... :.. ottiniiipu w th nlants of our native Mora, 



relates to other in- 



riculture as it 
dustries. 

"We want you to get your compre- 
hensive view of agriculture from the 
point of view of a farm boy on a Massa- 
chusetts farm with his future ahead, rare endemics, 
lie wants to know the opportunities in 
agriculture, the difficulties the farmer 
faces, his local conditions and the con- 
ditions of farmers in competing re- 
gions." 

The new course, it is expected, will 
guide Freshmen in choosing their 
major work for the upperclass years. 
It is being taught by ltalph W. Red- 
man, assistant director of extension ser- 
vice at M. A. 0., who had made a study 
of the agriculture of all the northern 
and western states as agricultural ex- 
pert of the United Slates Department 
of Agriculture and has worked in vari- 
ous associations with New England 
farming, as faruer, teacher and exten- 
sion worker. The course is. frankly, 
an experiment, the president declares, 
but is being developed by a teacher 
with unusual breadth of training, and 
with the Freshman class that has has 
the highest rating of any M. A. 0. class 
in years. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



I>KAI.KKS IN 



while among the Hawaiian specimens 
are excellent sheets of tropical eon... im- 
plants such as coffee, taro. indigo and 
pepper along with many curious and 



Ii.— V. S. Anderson, a former spec- 
ial student, is now doing private estate 
work iu Santa Barbara, Cal. 



ALUMNI 

Frank Luman Arnold 
The funeral of Frank I.uman Arnold, 
asupenntendent of the Merrima.- Chem- 
cal Company at North Woburn. was held 
Sunday afternoon at the North Congre- 
gational Church, North Woburn, Mt. 
Horeb lodge, A. I A A. M, of Woburn 
conducting its burial ritual. 

Mr. Arnold, who bad been in ill-health 
for more than a year, died Thursday at 
his home, 32 School street, North Wo- 
burn. Mr Arnold was bom in (Jranby 
.June 27, 1871, and was a graduate ot 
the Massachusetts Agrici.lt oral College 
at Amherst, in the class of 1801. He 
spent a number of years at the slate 
agricultural experiment station in Am- 
herst in specialized study under the 
notedchemist ,I)r. Charles H .Goessmat.n . 
•20.— K. W. Woodbury is I. charge 
of the greenhouse of the Department of 
Horticulture of the University of Ver- 
mont, Burlington, VI. 



DRY AIMD FANCY GOODS 

THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 l,y Ball. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
Sec them in our window 



Hi 



hoe 



tore 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable />/ dollars and sense.'''' 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma** 



C&rptrvter & Morehous*, 
PRINTET 




No j, Cook Place, 



Amhernt, Mas* 






«*»'-•' « * 



. oil t* fat* 






Vol. XXXIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

- — - — i i 

Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 17, 1923. 



No. 12 



ANOTHER VICTORY FOR 
MAC. QUINTET SATURDAY 



FL0YDS ENTERTAIN WITH 
TRICKS AND MIND READING 



Northeastern Defeated in One-sided 

Contest by Score of 42-18. 

Team Going Well. 

The Mass Aggie quintet chalked up 
another victory here last Saturday a- 
gainst the Northeastern aggregation 
with a seore of 42-18. Captain Marsh- 
man was in top-notch form and alone 
scored as many points as the visitors. 
Just before the close of the first half 
T umey wrenched his knee, but be fin- 
ished the game. 

Within a minute of the starting whistle 
Tumey scored the first basket after a 
clever floor combination. Immediately 
Marshman duplicated the performance 
but the visitors broke up the scoring 
momentarily when Captain Kneupfer 
scored from the foul-line. Marshman 
then received the ball from Barrows 
under tbe basket and scored again. 
Barrow, .hot a foul and Tumey passed 
to Marshman for another basket from 
tbe floor, making the seoro 0-1 Marah- 
man then Bank another, and after his 
opponents bad missed a foul he scored 
yet again. Barrows then sank two fouls 
and Captain Kneupfer scored again from 
a free try. Marshman dribbled through 
the Northeastern defense for another 
score and Tumey also shot true, making 
the score 19-2. Bike scored on a sensa- 
tional shot from mid-floor and Hale fol- 
lowed with another from the same dis- 
tance. Captain Marshman received tbe 
Continued on pare 2 



DEAN CHAS. R. BROWN OF 

YALE IN SUNDAY CHAPEL 



"Doe. Religion Pay?" "I'll Vote Ye.," 
Cried he, "with both Hand. Up." 

The student body was fortunate in 
having for tbe speaker in Sunday 
chapel on Jan. 14 Dean Cbas. H. Brown 
of the Theological School of Yale Uni- 
versity. Dean Brown is one of the 
most noted oratorical preachers in this 
< (untry and is much sought after as a 
speaker in all colleges of the country. 
He chose for his subject "Does Religion 
Pay?' 1 The speaker declared himself 
heartily in tbe opinion that it did pay. 
He used extracts from the Bible that 
clearly showed that the men of old be- 
lieved that it paid »o be pious and 
lead a clean straightforward life. He 
also quoted some passages that seemed 
to disprove the idea, but only in tbe 
sense that it did not pay in material 
rendered. The speaker brought his 
subject to date showing how it would 
apply to us in the present day. He 
said that the greatest reward which 
could come from doing a thing well 
was the ability to do it even better the 
next time. Dean Brown's talk was 
thoroughly practical and left something 
for the students to think about. 



Audience Delighted with Interesting 

Magic Revealed to Them by Floyd 

and Mahala. 

Last Friday evening, in Bowker 
Auditorium, the Floyd Magicians 
gave an exhibition of their skill 
iu tbe art of magic before a large 
and intensely interested audience. 
The entertainment was divided into 
three parts. During the first, Floyd 
performed a great many tricks, especi- 
ally of tbe type where two covered ar- 
ticles mysteriously change places. He 
accomplished the change with ease 
and rapidity and completely battled all 
those watching him. Upon his an- 
Continued on page 6 

A. D.TAYLOR GIVES LIVE 

TALK TO LANDSCAPE CLUB 

Mr. A. D. Taylor, '06, Professional 
Landscape Architect of Cleveland, 
Ohio, spoke, under the auspices of tbe 
Landscape Club, to about fifty student, 
on Friday allernoon, Jan. 12, instead 
of on Thursday, as originally planned. 
The Club also entertained eight guests 
from Smith College, who are taking up 
Landscape work there. 

Mr. Taylor talked from the stand- 
point of an alumnus, and as one who 
was really interested in giving the 
undergraduates the benefit of some of 
the practical experience which be has 
received since leaving college. The ad- 
vice which he gave was very practical 
in nature, and of general value, for, as 
he reminded the audience, it was 
applicable to any line of business what- 
soever a man might pursue after gradu- 
ation from college. 

Mr. Taylor brought out especially the 
following points: 

When you go to work for a man, re- 
member, that any employer wants, 
first, last, and always, is Efficiency. 
Efficiency means, specifically: 



Whole-souled cooperation with the 

employer. 

Application to one's work. 

Good, clear thinking. 

Besourcefullness, in time of need. 

Accuracy. 

Moderation in all things. 
Speaking of ability for learning, 
there are three kinds of men: the 
sieve, the duckboard, and tbe sponge. 
Be a sponge; and so be able to tell 
others what you have learned. 

Be alive to the times. The only 
difference between a rut and your 
grave is in the dimensions. 

Be able to use good English. The 
English language is the most important 
thing in the whole world the use of 
which we can develop and master- 
Mr. Taylor's talk was thoroughly en- 
joyed by everyone who heard it. He 
later answered several practical ques- 
tions which were asked, chiefly by 
members of the Landscape Department. 



TENTH ANNUAL MID- 
WINTER ALUMNI DAY 



Program. January 19-20, 1023. 

Friday, Jan. If, IMS, 

7-30 a. M.— Mid Winter Chapel a- 
ward of athletic and academic 
letters and medals. 

8-00 A. M. to 4-80 p. m.— Talks by 
alumni to students in regu- 
lar class periods. 

7-00 I*. ii.— Musical Club concert. 
Satuhoay, Jan. 20, MM. 

8-00 a. ii.— Academic Aetlritlai Al- 
umni Club breakfast. 
Breakfast meeting of alumni 
interested in athletics. 

10-00 a. M.— Business meet inc. of the 
Associate Alumni of M. A. C. 
12-00 m. — Alumni — Student dinner. 
2-00 i'. m.— Amherst M. A. C hock- 
ey game. 
3-15 p. h— Belay race with Wil- 
liams. 

3-30 p. m. — Freshman basket-ball 
game with Springfield High 

School of Commerce. 
8-00 p. m.— Fraternity Initiation 
Banquets. 

Tbe Registration desk will be 
opened in Memorial Hall 8 a. m. Fri- 
day. Tickets for the concert, play, 
dinner, and athletic events will lie 
given to alumni who register. 



PROF. HICKS' ENTHUSIASTIC 
GANG TRAMPS OVER MT. TOBY 



Perfect Weather, Good Crowd, Plenty 

of Snow, Hot Coffee, All Help 

to Make thi. Hike the Beat. 

Saturday morning, Jan. 13, Prof, 
Hicks and his gang of hikers made 
their weekly pilgrimage to Mt. Toby, 
which proved to be the most successful 
thus far. Tbe wind was blowing a brisk 
northwest and tbe snow was a good :!() 
inches deep on the level from " Wood- 
bury'." to "Big Toby, "but the sky was 
blue and clear and the sun's rays, pierc- 
ing tbe boughs of the snow-encrusted 
evergreens, did its best to add to the 
sparkle of the brook along the trail. 

Tbe party, being on snowsboes, was 
able to break trail fairly well until they 
struck a steep cliff about a mile from 
tbe faculty cabin, which was their des- 
tination. Here on the cliff, everyone 
had to go on foot, except "Charlie" 
Steele who made the whole ascent on 
snowsboes and thereby claims tbe 
championship of Hampshire County. 
He stands willing to meet all chal- 
lengers, however, who are ready to 
come out and make the same climb on 
Continued oa page S 



TWO MORE SUCCESSES EOR 
COLLEGE MUSICAL CLUBS 



Regular Programs Given at Hadley 

and at Northampton Elks' Home 

Before Large Audiences. 

The Hadley concert by the Musical 
Club., which is usually srlic <lule<l for 
before Christmas, was given Wednes- 
day evening, .January 10, at (lie Hadley 
town hall (O • gratifying crowd. Many 
of tbe younger set of tin- town were at 
t ratted by the dance which followed 
tbe concert. 

The program was essentially (he 
same as that rendered at I he Copley 
Plana in Boston daring th. Christmas 
trip. One change was made by the 
insertion of (be new quartet tor an 
orchestra number. This ipiarlct con- 
sisted of Darting '24, 1st tenor. Williams 
"'24, '2nd tenor, Non-toss '20, 1st bass and 
Cavin '2M, 2nd bass. A violin solo was 
also included in (he program. The 
concert proceeded smoothly with 
Weatherwax's clever pantomimes and 
Noicross' stdos MOTing distinct hits. 
"Sons of Old Massachusetts" was pre- 
sented as a closing number, by the 
entire club and inn audience tendered 
tbe courtesy of standing throughout 
the song. 

During the dance which followed re- 
freshments were served and the men 
returned to A mlicisl aboiil midnight on 
a special car. 

On the following Friday the most 
successful oonon ri of trie year was pre- 
sented at the Klks Home in Nortliainp 
ton. The program was nearly the same 
as at Hadley. except for a clarinet solo 
by Fuller 'IM, which was not included 
at Hadley. 

Continnad on paga 8 



FIRST HOCKEY CONTEST OF 
SEASON GOES TO B. U. 6-1. 



Lamb Make. Only Score for Aggie 

In First Hard Oame. Team 

Against William. Today. 

The Mass. Aggie Hockey team opened 
l heir season at the Moston Arena last 
Thursday evening when they went down 
to defeat before the Boston I niversity 
sextet to the tune of 0-1. Besides being 
i he first .game of the season it was the 
first time many of the players had ever 
been on artificial ice, and taking all 
thing, into consideration it was not 
such a pool game as the score would 
seem to indicate. The game was one of 
a double header at the Arena and 
proved fast and exciting. 

COMB Collins expressed his opinion 
that the team showed much of the 
aggressive spirit which has character- 
ised Ageie teams in the past. At times 
the passing was exceptionally good and 
taking into consideration another fact 
that for some of the men this was the 
Continnad on pane 8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17. 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1923. 



Athletics 



NORTHEASTERN DEFEATED 

Continued from pafe 1 



ball under the basket and added two 
more. HarrowB made good on another 
foul but the visitin" captain scored for 
the third time from the fouMine, mak- 
ing the score 20-tt. .Sinithhurst then 
Hcored t he first tloor basket for North- 
eastern with a pretty shot, and Captain 
Kneiipfer followed with another, leaving 
the store at the end of the half M>1 in 
favor of the Maroon. 

Harrows scored first in the second 
period with a foul shot. Btodo made a 
donbll counter but two in succession 
by Barrows and Marshman brought the 
Uon up to 3'2-f>. Kiccio then made a 
beautiful shot for a score but Hale offset 
it with a long, graceful shot. A foul, a 
basket, and another foul by Barrows 
brought the score to 18-11. Marshman 
sank a long one and Harrows dropped 
two more fouls through the hoop. Cap- 
tain Kneiipfer made a mid-lloor shot. 
At this point "Kid"' put in his second 
learn whereupon Cotter, Sinithhurst, 
and Kneiipfer scored in succession. 
The varsity re-entered the game just 
before the final whistle with the score 
42-18. 

Summary : 

M. A. C. 

it. K. i'. 

Harrows, If :i * M 

Ferranti, If 

Tuiney, rf I © 4 

Samuels, if Q 

Marshman, <• U 1H 

Dickinson, 8 > ° 

Hike, rb 1 (i 2 

Seaver, rb 

Hale, lb * »> 4 

Kicker, II. U U 



fast defensive men for the Univesity 
aggregation. 
The lineup: 

MASS AOOIK llOSTON INIV. 

Whitaker Nicoll, c c McArdle, l'rovost 
Lamb, Hilyard, rw 1 w, Aimer 

Gordon. Iw rw, Sherman. Hlaize 

Goldsmith id bl, Sterling, Cochrane 

Hodsdon, Tewhill, Id rd, Kontoff, 

Fra/.ier 

Coals — Aimer, I; McArdle; l'rovost; 
Kontoff; Lftmb. Officials— Doody and 
Stewart. Time- Three lO-minutes per- 
iods. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio— MASONIC BLOCK— Northampton. 

Club Mirht Dances— popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lesions by Appointment 

Telephone 7U1 Northampton 



KINGSLEY'S 
SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 
140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



This afternoon the team is at Pitts- 
field where they will engage in a game 
with the fast Williams Aggregation, at 
the Winter Carnival being held by 
Aggie Alimini. Due to an injury re- 
ceived in a collision recently in which 
Whitaker lost three teeth, a shift in the 
team will be necessary. The forward 
line will he principally affected. Uods- 
don is fast rounding into shape and 
hopes to get into the Williams game. 
In their last game the Williams team 
defeated the btnnsalaer sextet 3-1. The 
probable line-up for the Williams game 
is: 

Gordon, e; Lamb, rw; Hilyard, lw; 
Goldsmith, rf; Hodsdon, Id; Algbror 
Baker, goal. 

Saturday the Aggie team takes on 
the Amherst sextet here. Last Saturday 
Amherst was defeated by the Army 2-1. 



NORFOLK SUITS 

Grays, browns and mixtures, in weight suitable for year 'round 
wear. Special reductions to clear our stocks for Inventory, Feb. ist 

These are worth looking over. 

Priced from $26.00 up 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

PROMISES COMPETITION 



17 



N'ortlu astern 



42 



P 



Kneiipfer, rf 
Kiccio, If - 
Sinithhurst, If 
('otter, e 
Urquarl, c 
Barton, lb 
Stewart, rb 
Root, rb 



it. v 

14 8 

2 4 

2 4 

1 2 

tl 





tl 



7 4 10 

Time— 20 minute periods. Referee— 
Kshjornson of .Springfield. Seoreathalf 
time— M. A.C 2d : Northeastern— 7 



B. U. WINS 6-1 

Continued from page 1 



first intercollegiate game-, the showing 
was not so bad. Four or five days of 
continuous snow, had prevented the 
team from actual ice work just previous 
to the game. 

The individual starring of the Boston 
University men proved the undoing of 
the carefully coached Aggie team work, 
and their victory may be attributed to 
their familiarity with the ice, coupled 
with unavoidable goals as the results 
of numerous scrimmages in front of the 

cage. 

Because of a recent illness. "Shorty" 
Hodsdon was only used for a few min- 
utes during the game, and his absence 
was greatly felt. As the first game en- 
ded in an overwhelming defeat, Coach 
Collins is optimistic about the coming 
season and with fair weather and a little 
cooperation the College is assured of a 
team worthy of representing her on the 

ice. 

For the Aggies the work of Goldsmith 
and Alger were the features of the 
game, while Sterling and Kontoff proved 



Sophomores and Freshmen as yet 
Undefeated, with 14 More Games 
to be Played. 
The interclass basketball season is 
fairly well underway uow that the va- 
rious stars have struck their stride. 
The line teams, including the two years 
are qttlM evenly matched so that the 
championship is greatly in doubt. Al- 
though the Freshman and Sophomore 
teams have not yet been defeated the 
other teams still have a lighting chance 
to triumph. The rest of the schedule 
will be completed on the dales given 
below. All games will start at 6-30 r.M. 
unless a Social Union entertainment 
falls on the same night, as it does on 
Feb. 9, which case the starting signal 
will be blown at S p, H. sharp. 

The games yet to be played are as 
follows: 

Friday, Jan. 19, '26 vs.2 Year, '24 vs.'25 
Friday. Jan. 26, '23 vs. '26, '24 vs. 2 Year 
Friday, Feb. 2, '26 vs. '25, '23 vs.2 Year 
Friday, Feb, 16, '25 vs. 2 Year, '23 vs.'24 
Thursday, Feb. 22, '26 vs.2 Year,'24vs.'25 
Monday, Feb. 26, '23 vs. '26, '24 vs.2Year 
Monday, March2, '23 vs.2 Year,'25 vt.'26 

The team standing is as follows: 
Team. Won. Lost. t 

'25 I 1000 

26 1 1.000 

'23 1 1 -500 

2 Yr. 1 .000 

'24 2 .000 



FIRST RELAY RACE TO BE RUN 
WITH WILLIAMS SATURDAY 

The relay race with Williams has 
been arranged so that it will be run im- 
mediately after the hockey game here 
on Saturday, Jan. 20. 

There is a dearth of stellar material 
competing for the team this year. 
With the exception of Captain Mac- 
Cready, whose ability is well kuown to 
the followers of track events in this col- 
lege, there are no unusually fast men 
on the team. "Mac" of course will run 
in the race Saturday; the other three 
men will be chosen, by elimination, 
from Gifford, Isaac, Fernald, Loring, 
Roberts, Tisdale, Peirce, and Nelson. 



AGGIE MEN! 

If you have either small or large feet you can save at least $4.00 
by buying a pair of Oxfords during our sale. 



$10.00 Oxfords . 
$12.00 Stetsons . 



$4.95 
$8.25 



Sizes 6, 6%, 7, 7^ — 10, io}4, II, n# 



COME IN AND LOOK AROUND! 

E. M. BOLLES 



Fountain Pens 

Ink 

Kodaks 

Genuine Eastman Film 

Victrolas 

Victor Records 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



The only place to get A 



SUNDAY NIGHT SUPPER 

is at 

IE INN 

Right by the Campus Entrance. 



Academic Activities 



MUSICAL CLUBS 

Continued from page 1 



A large crowd was present in the 
chapter room where the concert took 
place. It was a success from every 
angle, Weatberwax scoring again and 
Fuller coming in for honors. 

Directly following the concert, supper 
was served in the grill and was followed 
by a dance in the chapter room. 

The Elks proved themselves royal 
entertainers, the men being given the 
freedom of the fully equipped home 
wbicb iucluded a pool room aud a large 
radio set. 

Another concert in Northampton is 
under consideration and an extra date 
has been taken on for a concert in 
Springfield, March 7. 

Op Friday, Jan- 19, the clubs will 
perform at Slockbridge Hall in honor 
of the alumni, and next week Friday, 
Jan. 26, a concert is scheduled for Shel- 
burne Falls. 



ASSEMBLY, JAN. 17 

The speaker in assembly on Jan. 17 
will be Mr. Walter R. Clarke. Mr. 
Clarke graduated from M. A. C. with 
(he class of 1010 and has since then 
been developing a large fruit farm in 
Milton, New York. 




Handsome— 

and he admits it! And he's 
a wise one, too. He 
brushes his hair with 
"Vaseline" Hair Tonic. 
No one knows better than 
he, the sleek, smart effect 
it gives to his head. And 
he also knows that it is 
a wonderful hair tonic. 

At all drug stores and 
student barber shops. 

CMHHOOOH mam l A( li him; CO, 

OMMMMsd I 
Matr Strrct New Y"rk 

Every "Van line" product is recom- 
mended everywhere because of its 
absolute purity at-d effectiveness. 

Vaseline 

KEG U» PAT orr 

HAIR TONIC 



MT. TOBY HIKE 

Continued from psg« 1 



Jan. 27, (he date set for the next hike. 
Even "Curry's" solid "190" more thaD 
once loomed up as prize booty for the 
steep ravine below (his slippery pass. 

The party having once conquered the 
cliff, made a "hungry wolf" cross coun- 
try dash for (he cabin, wbere a roaring 
fire and a cup of "Curry's" Prize Brand 
coffee soou had everybody in fine 
spintB, including "Sug" Kane's re- 
frigerated feet. This reminds us that 
we almost forgot to mention the com- 
bined record-breaking skiing accomp- 
lishment of "Sug" and bis fellow suf- 
ferer, Walter Maboney, both of whom 
made the adveuture on skiis. "Sug" 
being firmly strapped to his skiis made 
the up hill grind by an intermitteni 
series of exultant kangaroo leaps, main- 
taining said skiis at angle of about 4-> 
Walter said that he had no difficulty at 
all except for the fact that be bad no 
harness for his "seven leagues," there- 
by being frequently inconvenienced by 
finding himself at the bottom of his 
skiis. Before leaving the cabin, be 
made sure that be was firmly strapped 
to bis "shooters," althougii be found 
considerable trouble in (browing them 
into the reverse so as to facilitate an 
exit through the cabin door. 

"Sug" and Waller preferred to go 
down with a few others and ilag a C. V. 
train home, but most of the party made 
the trail back to Woodbury's aud then 
walked about two miles up beyond Mu- 
lish b;>tcbery before the Sunderland car 
caught them. Some of our modern in- 
door sport fans on the campus will prob- 
ably shrink from the thoughts of this 
bike, but just let them ask any of the 
"gang" if t bey bad a good time! 



DR. J. E. WILLIAMS TO SPEAK 
IN ASSEMBLY NEXT WEEK 

Dr. J. K. Williams, vice-president of 
the University of Nanking, will speak 
at Assembly on Wednesday afternoon, 
Jan. 24. Dr. Williams plans to spend 
all of Wednesday and part of Thursday 
on our campus. Here is an opportunity 
for all who desire to acquaint them- 
selves with the actual work done by 
our people in Cbiua, and of the possi- 
bilities for future work. Dr. Williams 
has expressed a desire to meet all stu- 
dents who are at all interested in tbe 
life and struggles of that great and 
wonderful race. Mr. Manna will be 
glad to reserve appointments for any 
who desire to embrace this opportunity. 



FULL PROGRAM OF SPEAKERS 
FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 



The Student Council of (he two-year 
course was entertained last Thursday 
evening, Jan. 11, at tbe home of Prof. 
Phelan. Following supper, the Council 
was tbe guest of Prof. Phelan at a per- 
formance of tbe Amberst Players. 



Several Prominent Alumni to give 

Talks Under Auspices of Various 

College Departments. 

A very Interesting and lull program 
has been planned for Mid-winter 
Alumni Days, next Friday ana Satur- 
day. Under tbe auspices of the vari- 
ous departments, a number of talks 
will be given by alumni and men con- 
nected with other colleges. Friday, at 
8-<M) a. m., in Room K, French Hall, 
Arthur W. lliggins '1)7, president ol the 
A. W. Blgglna Incorporated Fertilizer 
Manufacturing Company of South Deei 
field, will speak on "The Fertilizer In- 
dustry". At DIM), in lb i 1) of the 

same building, II. F. Toinpsoli (l">, head 

of the Vegetable Gardening Depart- 

inent of M. A. ('., will talk on "The 
Vegetable (ianlening Industry". At 
1-00 i*. M.,also in Boom D, Flench Hall, 
Krnest Russell 'US, treasurer of ihe A. 
W. Higgins Incorporated Manulact nr- 
ing Company, will give a talk on "As- 
paragus Crowing in Ihe CoBMCttOttl 
Valley". 

The Department of Agricultural Fco- 
nomics has secured as speakers William 
Kimball '10, who is with the Orange 
Cooperative Bank, and Saxon D. Clark 
'Hi, a fruit and products broker in Bos- 
ton. Tbe former will speak at M-(X) a. 
m., Friday, in (lark Hall, ami the latter 
at '.'-no and 10-(M) in the same building. 

J. A. Hyslop '08, with Ihe Bureau of 
Kntoinology at Washington, D. ('., will 
give talks at !>-(K) A. m. and l-(M) i\ m. 
Friday in Fernald Mall. 

I'nder tbe auspices of the Dairy !>•■ 
pepariment, David liultrick '17, now in 
tbe dairy products business in Arling- 
ton will give three talks the first at 
M-00 a. M., the next at 11-00, and the 
third at II -4ii i\ m.— all on Friday and in 
Flint Laboratory. 

The Agricultural Division is trying to 
secure as speakers Thornton Clark '02, 

who is fanning in tirauby, and An bur 
Hubbard '00, who is farming in Nundei- 
land. Tbe time and place tor their 
talks has not yet been decided Upon. 

Saturday, at K-IK) \. »., I;. II. Patch 
'11, Assistant Professor of Floiicull uic 
at Connecticut Agriculture College, 
will talk on "Opportunities »>f Floricul- 
ture and What the Student Ought to 
Take in College". The Department of 
Floriculture is endeavoring to secure 
two ot her speakers. 

Under the auspices of the English 
Department. II. J. Ilaker. director of 
tbe F.xtension Service of Connecticut, 
will speak on " Knglish." This will be 
at \. m. Saturday in Memorial Hall. 

The program for Mid-winter Alumni 
Days has been p'anned for alumni and 
students of M. A. C. II is an occasion 
for alumni and students to get together. 
Kveryone is urged to co-operate in mak- 
ing this' tenth annual reunion day tlie 
most successful of all. 




A prescription that's a sure 
Clirc lor clothing worries — 

Rogers Ped suits and over- 
coats. 

The pick of the world's finest 
fabrics. 

The bett tailoring that skilled 
hands can produce. 

Prices moderate. 

Rook us Pkkt Company 

broadway Herald Sipiare 

at Kith Si. "Four at I6tfa St 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 41st St. 

NFW YORK CITY 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Anil other ■SOd tlUNtfH to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.4ir>-W) Hadley. Mas* 



FINAL TRY-OUT 

Come ID »nd tu voio SSI'S between '.I IHJ 4. S)« 

l>ei . 4th. ionl x M I ■ M.. DSC lot h. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rex all Storm 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 

P. D.HOMANS, 

Prop. 
Tel. 489-W 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Kitchen 



Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1913. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



iKv.H.i W. Si,a..k '28 Editor ln-Thlef 

I., unit II. Arkinoton '28 Managing Editor 

I)KI'AI!TMKNT llKADH'. 



Editorial. 

Mliletics. 
Arailt'ini' s - 
( ampiM. 



Iievis.i W. Hi.mh. 'JM 
Ai.Bititr K. Wai oh'24 
l.l wis H. KKITll tf 

i.i i in i: it. aaarxoron ti 
Qioaoa i- Cm sea ***• 

.lollN (i. IIK.AH ft 
IIIMtUH r. OUVtft. Jit- II 
KMI1.V G. SMI I II "2 r > 

III ill M- Wood >M 

I,. KltANOIS KknnkoY "24 

John M. Wmittiiik '28 



Fatuity. 
A I ii innl. 
Two-Ycai . 
Esesanne ens' 
Conusant) ;iti(.iis,s\ii. Coaaa '2« 



Husinkhh Department. 
Owkn E. Foi,st)M '28 Baslness Manager 

KO..KR1 K. 8TF.KKE '24 Advertising Manager 
Ci iffOttO I.. BUM* "24 Circulation Manager 
Dovalo w. Lawis-el i»avi.. Noxoa "■ 

(ill.llKKT .1. IIVtHKI.KK 'i r > 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopiea, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered aa Mfondolaw matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. Accented for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section HOT. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1»18. 



Owlttf tt> llW fad thai the editor's 
private mail w:vs opened, it is thought 
that a personal letter contained in the 
comnninieaiion was lost. Another let- 
ter to the editor's home address would 
be appreciated. 



On a State University. 

The issue of ■ state university for 
Massachusetts is the all important 
question this year from I he standpoint 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. It is with I large degree of antic- 
ipation ami interest that the report of 
the special commission appointed by 
Gov. Cos is awaited. Massachusetts, a 
state which may justly feel proud of 
the opportunities ami facilities for 
higher education afforded by its uni- 
versities and colleges, has been attacked 
as being lax Id providing for the edu- 
cation of those men and women who 
cannot afford an expensive education. 
This attack is largely fabulous, as sta- 
tistics show that the Hay State from 
1916-1031 has increased its registration 
,,I students more than in any other part 
,,1 the country. New York included. 
Furthermore, 70.2% of the total number 
of students registered in Massachusetts 
universities and colleges are residents 
of Massachusetts. It is certain that the 
Commonwealth is taking care of a very 
large number of residents, and is lead- 
ing in this respect over those states 
which maintain state universities. 

Boston College, Northeastern College, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Knnnanuel College. Boston University, 
Clark University, Tufts College, Lowell 
Textile School, Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute serve residents of Mass- 
achusetts primarily. Even careless 
observation proves that location in 
cities ami free tuition is the reason for 
large enrollment from the state. It is 
not the merit of the institution that 
draws students, but the matter of 
finances that determines the choice in 
all probability. U the cost of a college 
education is such a large factor, it is no 



small wonder that agitation for a Blate 
university is Insistent and widely prev- 
alent in certain circles. Educational 
facilities may be adequate enough, but 
if there is no possibility of making UBe 
of the facilities because of insufficient 
funds, of what avail are they? 

If the special commission reports 
negatively on the state university ques- 
tion it will certainly be a carefully 
reached conclusion and the report will 
be justifiable from the standpoint of 
scientific research. Mr. Zools of the 
Federal Bureau of Education, who has 
been directing the inquiry for the com- 
mission, has enlisted the service of 
numerous special investigators who 
have left no field untouched. Engin- 
eering education, educational facilities 
for young women, cost of a state uni- 
versity in Massachusetts, entrance re- 
quirements in existing institutions, 
preparation of high school teachers, 
technical education below four-year 
college grade, and even the proportion 
of high chool graduates showing su- 
perior intelligence (whatever that may 
have to do with a state university) are 
some of the subjects receiving careful 
consideration. In the final analysis, 
however, the whole movement resolveB 
itself down to a question of dollars and 
cents. If the state had a plentiful sup- 
ply of money, a university would be 
erected whether the existing facilities 
were adequate or uot. As funds are 
limited the matter must be given the 
closest scrutiny. Suppose the commis- 
sion reports against the state univers- 
ity. Will the matter be dropped.' 
Certainly the answer is no. Can the 
difficulty be alleviated satisfactorily.' 
Here is a plan. 

Granting that the average resident 
bas difficulty in going to college be- 
cause of the adverse pecuniary circum- 
stances, it would be possible to subsi- 
dize present colleges and universities to 
the extent that tuition would be low- 
ered materially. For instance, a slight 
tuition in Boston University would re- 
move most of the cost of a college edu- 
cation for those residents of Boston, 
and have the same effect as the build- 
ing of a state university in the city. In 
Worcester the same plan would be fol- 
lowed, making it convenient and cheap 
for Worcester residents. The lowered 
tuition rates would be possible for 
those students residing in the slate 
only, all others paying the regular 
rates. Perhaps the final cost to the 
state would be greater than tb* found- 
ing of a state university, yet this plan 
would be more satisfactory to indus- 
trial centers without question, and in 
the long rup prove advantageous to the 
majority of resident citizens rather 
than to any one class in any one section 
of the state. 



Campus News 



TICKETS NOW RESERVED FOR 
MUSICAL CLUBS CONCERTS 



Town Hall, Amherst 



At Framingham and Worcester Nor- 
mal Schools. See Snow '23 or 
Belden '24. 

The Mass. Agricultural College Musi- 
cal Clubs are giving a joint concert with 
the Worcester Normal School Musical 
Clubs on Friday evening, Feb. 2, at Wor- 
cester, in the North HighSchool. There 
will be a dance after the concert. 

Any desiring to attend this concert 
should make their reservations at once 
with either Snow '2*, Alpha Gamma 
Kbo House or Belden '24, Kappa Sigma 
House. Or if living in the vicinity of 
Worcester, get your tickets of Mr. 
Glenn U. Carrath, care Farm Bureau, 
11 Foster, Street, Worcester, Mass. 

The tickets are 75 cents, or with the 
reserve section, *1 per seat. 

A similar joint concert is to be given 
with Framingham Normal School Musi- 
cal Clubs on Thursday evening, Feb. 1, 
at 8 o'clock in May Hall at the school 
tickets will be 50 cents each. 



Wedn'day 

— AND— 

Thursday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 



Mat 3. Eve. 
6-4 5. 8-30 



Two Dayt . Thursday Prices 

Norma Talmadio in "SMIL- 
IN THROUGH" 8 reels. 

I from Allen l.anuilmi Martin's 
famous iilay. with a oast, in- 
cluding Wyndham Standing 
and HarrUon Ford. 
Fox Newt Comedy 

May HcAvoy in 
•'THE TOT OF NEW YORK" 

A heart interest drama of 
the roof toi» of New York, 
with May McAvoy in the role 
of a little dancer. 

Sport Review 

Butter Keaton in "Ths 
BlacKtmith" 

Jack Holt in mmm „ 
"WHEN SATAN SLEEPS." 

from Peter B. K> lie's story. 

"The i'aison of l'anaincnt.' 

Now* 

■J- reel Mermaid Comedy 

Retty Compton. Richard Dix 

Monday -JR r onded ow wohan" 

A story of shipwreck and the 

South Heat. 
Neil Burgos* in "The Son of 

a SheiK. 

(Positively a scream) 

Paths Review 



Saturday 

Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



F. B. COOK 23 RESIGNS AS 

HEAD OF M. A. C. C. A. 



INTERFRATERNITY RELAY 



Jan. 12. 

Delta Phi Alpha won from Q. T. V. 
(forfeit) 2.44.2. 

Phi Sigma Kappa won from Kappa Gam- 
ma Phi 2.25.9. 

ThetaCbiwon from Alpha Sigma Phi 
(forfeit) 2.44.9. 

Lambda Chi Alpha won from Kappa 
Sigma (forfeit) 2.29.4. 

Jan. 15. 

Phi Sigma Kappa won from Kappa Ep- 
silon 2.20.5. 

Delta Phi Alpha won from Kappa Gain- 
ma Phi 2.23.2. 

Alpha Gamma Rbo won from Sigma 
Phi Epsilon 2.20.1. 

Lambda Chi Alpha won from Alpha 
Sigma Phi 2.23. 

Alpha Gamma Kho has made the fastest 
time so far 2.20.1. 



Stevenson and Holway '24 Nomi- 
nated for New President. AH Who 
Signed Membership Cards Elig- 
ible to Vote. 

Frederick B. Cook '23, resinned on 
Wednesday, Jan. 10, from the presi- 
dency of the M. A. C. Christian Associ- 
ation. During bis term of office Cook 
has sufferedcontinuously from ill health, 
which bas greatly impaired bis normal 
efficiency. Feeling that he could no 
longer do justice to the duties of his 
position, he asked to be relieved of fur- 
ther responsibility. 

The members of the cabinet desire to 
express their appreciation of his con- 
scientious work and of his deep interest 
iu the association. They earnestly hope 
that be will soon regain his bealih, 
and once more take an active part in the 
work which means so much to him. A 
special election has been called by the 
cabinet to elect a new president to till 
the unexpired term of Cook. The bal- 
loting will take place on Jan. It and 20. 
Mr. Hanna's office in North College is 
to be used as the polling place.and will 

be open on Friday from 4 to 5-30, 6-15 to 
8, and on Saturday morning from 8-30 

to 12. 

The cabiuet presents the names of 
two Juniors as candidates for the office, 
Harold I). Stevenson and Clarence W. 

Holway. 

All students who signed the declara- 
tion of purpose in the drive for mem- 
bership iu the association are eligible to 
vote. 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLK LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, h Pone 456-K, P.O. Block 

Academy of Music, Northampton 



Monday. Tueteay and Wedaetdajr. 
January 15. 16. 17 

, -FINK DOflU.K RJUtf- 

"The Valley of Silent Men," AhM w,t 



"Second Fiddle," 



Rubins 

a Hodkinson 
All-Htar Picture 



FOURTH FACULTY DANCE 

ENTERTAINS SEVENTY 

The fourth of a series of monthly Fac- 
ulty Dances was held in the Memorial 
Building, Saturday evening Jan. 13. 
Twenty-five couples attended. Dancing 
was enjoyed from 7:45 to 11:16, music 
being furnished by Frost's Orchestra. 
Punch was served during the evening 
The committee in charge consisted of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Smith, Mr. Rod- 
gers, Mr. and Mrs. Gunness, and Mrs. 
Hicks. The next dance, which is plan- 
ned for some dale in February, will be 
a masquerade. 



Friday and Saturday. January 19, 20 

"The Silent Call," \v,,n<ier 1>«» K «.f the Screen 

A Distinctive Industry 

There is not another industry dealing 
with so delicate a product, requiring so 
much care to handle where lack of at- 
tention means so much loss, as in the 
dairy industsy. 

Nor is there an industry where such 
careful provision against loss of quality 
has been made as the safe, distinctive, 
sweet, wholesome, sanitary cleanliness 
so thoroughly and easily supplied by 
the use of 

w r f rtj ir~\sm*rt 5 ^^^^J 



C/eaner <m</ C/eanser 



Among other things the use of th - 
cleaner entirely removes from dairy 
equipment and processes the cause «>t 
fishy, metallic and oily flavors to milk 
products. It is itself entirely free from 
grease, will not produce a greasy suds, 
and cleans so thoroughly and rinses so 
freely that all sour and stale odors are 
completely removed from the plant Bad 
equipment. 

An order on your supply house is a 
definite step to higher scoring product- 



Indian in 
circle 




It cleans clean. 



in every 
packaee 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturer 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1923. 



WALSH MIIM II AMMSi: AND SERVICE 



"Day by day, in every way It'fj ftef'a better, 'abetter." 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



FL0YDS ENTERTAIN 

Continned from page 1 

noiincement that he would repeat ;i 

nick so that evevmie might understand 

it, the audience believed that lie was 
to show them its secret ; Kill instead he 
simply did ii o\ei again in the same 
way as before and no one knew store 
about it after he had finished. 

Surprising as i he lir.,, part ol I be en- 
tertainment had been, the second pail 
was still more wonderful. "Mahala", 
the mind-reader, blindfolded on the 
slay*', described accurately a great 
variety of 'objects which people in the 
audience handed to Floyd as he walked 
tip and down through the aisles. Then 
Mahala, still blindfolded, performed 
the remarkable feat of adding several 
columns of figures which various mem- 
bers of the audience wrote upon a 

black boaid. 

Th* third pari of the entertainment 
consisted of Floyd's performance ol 

some complicated tricks, severs! of 
which were ol his own Invention, He 
closed I he exhibition with ihe Chinese 
rint; trick which he did very skillfully. 
<J. F. MaheL, musical director, gave 
pieced) ni and daring the entertain- 
ment several selections upon Ihe piano. 



NATION" EDITOR TALKS 

ON "BASIS OF PEACE" 



Norman Thomas Disucsses the War 
' Problem. 

The assembl j speaker last WTedneeduj 

was Mr. Nofuian Thomas, Contributing 
Kditor of Tkt Nation, ami representing 

The League for Industrial Democracy. 
New York City. Mis subject was "The 
Basis of Peace.'' 

'We have made much progress in 
science, "said Mr. Thomas, "but little in 
the art of living together. We have lail- 
ed to organize human life. Man has 
learned to do what no ot hei animal has 
in kill himself. One of I he things which 
hits made war probable, and peace dil- 
ticult, is the feeling of nationalism 
which has gradually grows up. It is 
bard to explain, but is present, It is a 
'"'d-like state over everyone, and is 
likely to cause trouble. A II nations are 

inter-de pendent, but this is denied by 

nationalism. It is quite futile to think 
of peace as long as this feeling holds. 

Another cause is absentee owner- 
•blp, causing division between owner and 
worker, each trying to get all he can. 
The grearest interest can be obtained 
by investing iu a backward nation, as 
did England, France, and Germany, 
The problems of peace come closely 
home. 

"Ihe coming generation must think 
things out, not be led by sentimentality. 
l'cace is a matter of organization, not 
ol sentimentality. We can't keep fait h 
nith those who died unless we live for 

things for which they died, that 
- might cease. I challenge you to 

" bring this about.'" 



HOWARD BATES 73 ELECTED 
SENIOR HOCKEY MANAGER. 



TWO NEW COURSES BEING 

OFFERED BY MR. HANNA 

Mr. Haaai will offer two courses dur- 
ing I he winter lei in, one en I be interna- 
tional Situation, and ll (heron the 

Bible. 

The lirst course, eulilled "The Prin- 
ciples of a Wariess Wori.rwiii be given 

on Tuesdaj and Wednesday evening! 

not on Thursday sveuiag as previous- 
ly announced ai MO t>, m. in ihe li- 
brary of French Hall, and will be open 
to all students of the college. For the 
sake of those wbe> desire to attend the 

course, bui are unable to do BO on Tues- 
day evening, il is being repealed on 
Wednesday evening. 

The second course on "How we got 

our Bible* 1 will be giv u Tbursda) 

evening at ti :{(> in ihe same building, 

and will be open to women students. 
if a similar courts is desired bj sla <>i 

more ol the men si iidenl s. Ml . Ila una 

will be glad I ake arrangements for 

a place and I line ot meel ing. 

SUNDAY CHAPEL, JAN. 21 

\e.\i Sunday morning, the sermon 
will be preached b\ Bev. Yaughan 

Daboey, pastor of t be Second Congrega- 
tional Church, Dorchester. Bev. air, 

Dabaej « as lot some lime pastor of i be 

Communis) Cburefa at Durham. N. II.. 
which Is attended by many ofthe stu- 
dents ol Sea Hampshire State College, 

and he is now pasiorof one of the 

largest cburcbea in Boston. 



DEPARTMENT OF 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

The department of Professional Im- 
provement has a class of four members 
this term, Thej areas follows: B. L. 
Clapp its. <;. L Bauer 'M, C. K. Stearns 

and .1. F. Whiiiinoie. 

Clapp is here preparatory (O accept ing 

a position in a high school department 
of agriculture while baker and Steams 
an- already teaching is West Springfield 
High .school and Esses Agricultural 
.School respect Ivelj . 

This course has been in progress now 
lor lour yean and aims to teach special 

methods In agricultural teaching ami 
professional Improvement . 
This department is providing Prof. C. 

W. Kemp this week to help students 

who have practiced teaching ami prepare 
methods foi them. 



Professor Shaltuck of Boston I'n- 
Iversliy, a representative of the .Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, will be on the 
campus Wednesday afternoon Jan. 17, 

to meet all Methodist students, all 
foreign studenis, and all ol hers inter- 
ested in work with other races within 
or without the borders of the United 
Slates. There will be a meeting in I he 

Social Union Boom at *:80 r. u., to 
which a general Invitation la extended 

io all who are i Bterested. 



INDEX NOTE 

The following pictures will be taken 



\i a short Senior class meeting held it Mills' Studio, Sunday. Jan -1 

Wednesday after Assembly. Howard 10-flO.— Iinh'.r Hoard. 

- was elected manager ol ihe Sen- ]o~4."> I'hi Sigma Kappa, 

"key team for the interclass series H-Q0— M. A . <'. < . \ . Cabinet, 

ehich will start soon. 11-16— Junior Prom Committee. 



NOTE 

Robert Wood worth '84. has relumed 

to ihe campus after three weeks' illness. 



'04. I'm lessor Bldne) if. Haskell, 
director of the Experiment Station, has 
been elected president oi the American 

Social y ol Ag lomxii v 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 



TITH $40.00 worth of 
good Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal Mixture, 
well fed with gaod roughage, 
you can produce at current 
prices $170.00 worth oi' milk. 

These feeds to he found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealer's stock. 



>RN PRODI CI S REFINING CO. 

NtH York tin, ,h;i> 



Protein 



"»0 POOMDa nct ( l 



J" 



lSSfa*S 

r ' BD nujuj«* |5%: 



40 , /'rod in 



100 



pOUNOS 



net' 



>»i I - - - #00ji 

inM ■"* fJJ'atEM-^L 
i^WttS.*'* 



WStHO 



J&o*' 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1»13. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1923. 



MARKET GARDENERS FROM 
COLLEGE ATTEND MEETING. 
Prof, H. k. Tom yon. Anlttaat Pief. 

Koy 1). Harris, and Mr. (irant B. Sny- 
der of the Vegetable Gardening Depart- 
ment attended the meeting of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science held in Huston, Dec. 
27, 2K, and 21). Wednesday, Dec. 27, 
PfOf. II F. Tompson gave a paper be- 
fore 'I'" American Society for Horticul- 
tural Science on the close cooperation 
Of the extension and experimental 
work in vegetable nanlening. Thursday 
an informal gel together of Hie veueia 
ltle uardeninti men of north-eastern 
(Jolted States was bold Of which lime 
■tepa were taken lo make a systematic 
study of some of our leading vejjela- 
Ides In order to straighten out their 
varieties. Professor Tompson was elec- 
ted to head a committee lo start the 
work and report at some future meeting. 



FLOCK OF RHODE ISLAND 
REDS MAKES WORLD RECORD 

The poultry department has devel- 

! oped a Hock of pure bred Khode Island 

I Ked hens on the M. A. C. farm which 

have broken the world's record for flock 

average em; production. 

The flock has been bred for the last 
ten years, and has been subjected to 
various experiments for egg production 
improvement. The Hock at present 
consists of about :«K) birds and has be- 
hind it a record breaking average of 
200 eggs for the past year. 

The world's record for individual 
piodUClloa is Mo eggs, but (his cannot 
be compared to flock production in 
which an average of 1 BO is considered 

very good. 

Individual records for the Hock in- 
clude 202 eggs in a year by one hen and 
a male who sired 27 daughters who com- 
pleted the year wit h an average of '<^ 
eggs. 



Faculty 



FACULTY NOTES 

Prof. J. A. McLean, formerly head of 
the Department of Animal .Husbandry, 
but now connected with the Quaker 
Oats Company, is the author of a very 
attractively arranged, printed and illus- 
trated pamphlet, "The Dairy Herd, 
Judging, Selecting, Breeding, Feeding." 



Aggie Stationery 

i with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 192S 



Anniversary Sale 

Starts Thursday 

Notable reductions on many dependable items 
of meichandise— items that you need. 

The big values will go fast. Make your selec- 
tion early and share our profits. 



correct 



H. 

MENS OUTFITTER 



exclusive 



Why Young Men Should 
Consider Insurance Selling 



Seven Reasons for Life Insurance Career 



L 



1FE INSURANCE is founded on the 
highest ideals. 

It is capable of yielding a good income and the 

satisla tion of accomplishment. 

It offers opportunities for real leadership. 

It brings insurance salesmen in close associa- 
tion with big business and big business men. 

It requires education in business methods, 
law and finance. 

It is a field for workers, not shirkers. 

It is an alluring and practical calling for men 
ot dynamic energy. 





Life Insurance Company 

or Boston. Massachusetts 



The Experiment Station has lust a 
loyal and efficient man with the recent 
resignation "I B. W. Swift, who has ac- 
cepted a position under Director K. H. 
Forbes, Bureau of Animal Nutritional 
the Pennsylvania State College. Di- 
rt-dor Haskell points out that the Ex- 
periment Station gives opportunity to 
gain remarkable experience wbich will 
enable a young mar* to obtain and till 
positions of responsibility. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



M ass 



Dr. II. A. Love, Professor in Plant 
Breeding at Cornell, cave a series of 
five lectures Ibis past week «m ""SI at is- 
tical Metboils in Evaluating Experi- 
mental Work". About M members of 
tbe start', mainly from tbe Experiment 
station, attended tbe lectures. Dr. 
Love gave many private conferences to 
different members ol tbe Station, and 
bis visit was a source of real profit. 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B.1)RURY 

io Main Street. 



ti 



LARGE NUMBER OF M. A. C. 
FACULTY AT SCIENCE MEETING 



PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Pi liient Aiiioiiii the 

I anions Makes We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

is a Bond value for women who want the bent 

there Is in ft tMMBleM stockinK that yet 

will til Hie ankles tiimly. 



Entomologiatft, Including College 

Staff and Many Alumni are 

There in Force. 

At tbe annual convention of tbe 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science beld daring tbe Chrisl- 
nias vacation week at M. I. T., Cam- 
bridge, M. A. (,'. was well represented. 
Chrera bundred of our faculty were pre- 
sent. President Hulterriebl nave an 
important address, and Director Haskell 
as cbairman of tbe Coininitlee on Hor- 
ticulture was prominent. At a supper 
Of Ike Society for Horlicult ural Science 
Professor Watigh counted eleven of bis 
forniet pupils from M. A. C. and the 
I'niversity of Vermont. 

The following members of tbe Staff 
participated formally la the program: 
K. I- Hutterlield. 
C. P. Alexander. 
H. N. Wortbley. 
11. T. Fernald. , 
\V. II. Davis 
W. S. Krout. 
I'. .1. Anderson. 
A . V. « isinun. 
S. H. Haskell. 
F. W. Morse. 
C. H. Gould. 
F. C. Sears. 
\V. W. Cbenoweth. 
R. A. Van Meter. 
H. F. Tompson. 
A. P. French. 
S. K. Shaw. 
W. B. Mack. 
In addition to tbe above, tbe follow- 
ing graduates of tbe College not now on 
tbe staff participated in tbe program: 
E. P. Felt '91. 
A. F. Burgess 'i*.">. 
J. A. Hyslop '08. 
K. 1. Sinitb 111. 
('. F. Doucette'20. 
1) 3. Caffrey •». 
J. N. Summers '07. 
T. 11. .Jones ;08. 
\V. <i. Bradley ex TW. 
W. K. Totiingbam '03. 
J. II. Merrill "6. 

Continued on page 8 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prom ply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 

Tel. 9-J 




The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE MEMORIAL. BUILDING 

See us for Typewriters, Fountain Pens, Chem Aprons and all student supplies. 



T. ABELE '23, Manager 



M. RICHARDSON '23 



H. E. WEATHKRWAX '24 



W. DIMOCK '24 



— TRY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for Int-aleat 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Aruberst, Mass. 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order ■ $35.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

SuitB Pressed MJr Military faUotfai 



over ADAMS' DRDG BTOUC 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Repairing While U Wall 

MKW I'KICKS 

Men* Whole Soles. HuMm-i ll.-Hs . . . $2.50 

Mrim Half Snlen. Kubher lleeli . . . $1.75 

Men's Rubber Holes. Kubner If celg . . $2.25 

Mali's Half Soles $1.35 

Work fiuaranteeU-AMHKKST IIOUSK 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

< iirars and n«:aietU'8-S|>eci;i. i>i i<e per rarti.n 

on cigarettes. 

S.iiralt't's Chocolates and other leading lines. 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hoars: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, Saturday. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



IT'S A HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

* 

V. GRAND0NICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St- 



Amherst Book Store 



STATIONER* 



;v£ 



yjm 



•t-t.i 



Short Courses 



Just received a new 

Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal 
Paper, called "The Dyplomatic." 

See our window. 



On Saturday evening, Jan. 27, there 
is to be a reunion in Boston Of grad nates 
of the (wu-year course. The meeting is 
to he held at the Hotel Brunswick and 
will he attended by representatives from 
A m heist -Prof. 1'helan, Mr. French, the 
president of the Student Council, and 
the president of the senior class, all 
having been invited to attend, and to 
speak 



The members of the Winter School 
held a meeting last Tuesday and elected 
oflicers who are to Herve during the en- 
suing term of the School. The o dicers 
are Allen \V. Ilickson of Worcester. 
President; William KM more of Amherst, 
Canada, Secretary ; and Malcolm Neilson 
of Newton. Treasurer. The class plans 
to hold a meeting every Tuesday . 



Kour members of last term's course 
in vocational poultry have received cer- 
tificates as a result of having completed 
the required work. There are eleven 
members enrolled in the course i«>r the 
coming term 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

Academic Activities, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Assoc iation, 

Track Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hotkey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Roister I blisters, 

The A»^te Squib, 

Musical ( lubs, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

I rlt'|>lloli« 

Richard Mellen, Aut Sec. 175 J 
Richard Mellen, IfaugCf 175 J 
C. s. Hicks, General Mgr., 403--M 

Frank P, Rand, Manage? 13b R 

Roger B. Fiicnd, President 
Perry (',. liartlett, Manager 
John M. Whittier, Manager 
Charles \V. Steele, Manager 
Irving W. Slade, Kditm 
Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 
Philip B. Dowden, Manager 
Custav I.indskog, Manager 
Trescott T. Abele, kditor 



720 

»3»S 

170 

8325 
170 

x 33o 

53° 
861 W 



Thomas L, Snow, Manager 



720 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, Owen K. Folsoin, M i lag. 1 Sji.j 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard 15. Smith, Manager 8314 
M. A.. C, Christian Association, Frederick B. Cook, President 8330 

Public Speaking and Debating. Alexander Sandow. Manager 



The A.T. (i. Club of the two -year 
course beld their annual initiation ban- 
quet in Draper Hall last Saturday eight. 



AGGIE LOSES 42-15 to 

FAST DARTMOUTH TEAM 

Basketball Team Gets Fine Recep- 
tion at Hanover. 

Although clearly outclassed the Mass. 
Aggie basketball team pal up a good 
fight against odds at Dartmouth a week 
Ago today and came away with the 
short end of a 42-15 score. The Maroon 
started off with a bang and scored live 
points before thetirecn got started, 
but the tiranite Staters soon caught up 
and thereafter were never threatened 
by the Massachusetts aggregation. Hut 
tbe game was much better than the 
score shows. The team was given an 
excelent reception throughout their 
stay in Hanover. Summary: 
nAHTMotrtr. 



Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask lis to show you whatever you may be 
interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 
basis. U. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On tbe basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 
Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed. 
Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 
Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed. 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 ets per pair. 
We will sew soles if your shoes are (ioodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



$2.25 
1.90 
1.70 



«•** 



C. F. DYER 





11. 


K. 


p, 


Goldstein, rf 


2 


() 


ti 


Culleri, If 


i 


10 


in 


Moore. If 


1 





1 


r'rcidmari, <• 


:{ 


II 


») 


Walking, c 


tt 


(1 


u 


Miller, rb 


B 


(1 


10 


llecht. rb 











Sailer, lb 


1 


(1 


2 


deep, lb 


() 


2 


2 




16 


12 


42 




VI. A.I. 








IS. 


K. 


P. 


dale, lb 


1) 


(1 


11 


Hike, rb 


1 


«t 


2 


Marsh man, c 


1 





2 


Ferranti, If 





» 


» 


Harrows, If 











Tumey, rf 


1 


tl 


2 


Samuels, rf 





8 







— 


— 


— 




1 


» 


15 



*05. — d. E. Tomson, has been elected 
president of the Vegetable Grower's 
Association of America. 



WINCHESTER 
Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING k HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 17, 1923. 



This is the time of year to be thinking about your tailor-made suit for spring. It « ■*■* »**; 
order in early, for later on we are always rushed. We haue just rece,ved some most des,rable patterns 
spring woolens. Come in and look them over.^^^^^^ ^^ & GAULT 

College Tailors and Outfitters. 



FACULTY AT SCIENCE MEETING 

( iintiiiiii-d f i urn PCS* • 

(;. II. Lameon '08. 
1 1 tiny 15. Plereon l'.». 
William Mat her 1!». 
oiio Dtgenei '88. 
Georga < '. Bay l'i. 
s. <:. Brooke '10. 

A . Tennyson Heals 118. 

K. \Y. Allen '88. 

B, I.. Ilarlwell Hi». 
A. I.. Whiiinii - 08. 

s. W. Fletcher ''.«'•. 
A. .1. Farley '»>*. 
An Interesting feature was tbc re- 
union of M. A.c. entomologist, ol whom, 
ail told Hi. -it- were 68 la number In- 
cluding the entomological Hall ;l1 ,,K ' 
college, Badergraduataa ami alumni as 

fax back as 1888. 

on Thursday CTentng, Dec. 88, 88 M< 
A. C. entomologists with several otber 
Boa-entomological workers wen- present 
at a dinner, which la thoagbl lobave 

been ■ n rd breaker lor attendanee at 

these annual gatherings. 

II. T. I'Vrnaiil, «;. C. Cramptoo, <'. P. 
Alexander, a. I. Bourne ami II. N. 
\Voiihle\. w in. constitute the oollege 
entomology stall, and tbe following 
M. A. C. entomologleta were preeeol at 
tin- convention : 

C. If. Mim .tl X:'.. 

E. I'. Kelt '81. 

A . I'. Burgest "'•••"). 

I;. \. Cooley '•»•">. 

II. L. Frost '86. 

Win A. Booker '!•'.». 

K. 1 Smith (II. 

K. A. Back ti4. 
V. A. Bartletl tir.- 
John N Summen '0T. 

.1. A. llysh.p 'OS. 

w. s. Began oh. 

i;. 1). Whitmarsh 'OS. 

I). .). (all ley 00. 

(.. M. Codding '»>'.». 

,s. S. Crossinan '(«». 

M. T. Sulyan '(K». 

li. II. Allen 1<>. 

L. B. Mcl.aine TO. 

F. L. Thomas 10. 

<;. B. Merrill e\-Tl. 

.1. V. Schaftner. Winter Course 1011 

A. W. Dodge, Jr., '18, 
s. M. Dobanlan ex-'IS. 
(,). s. Lowry '18. 

C, M. Packard '18. 

1). W. .Jones 14. 

B. A. Porter '14. 

II. N. Hartley 1ft. 
W. t;. Bemii '1ft, 
I) F. Karnes 1(1. 
T. 11. Mitchell '18. 
1.. 11. Patch "I*. 
U. A. St. George '18. 
11. li. Pieraoa To. 

C. H- l'hipps l'». 
1',. I. Hodgson TO. 
c f. Doucltte "2t>. 
Guy F. MacLeod '20. 
II. \. Worlhley '20. 

c, K. Hofer. Winter Course 1020. 
1). II. Craig, Winter Course 1020. 

I), s. Lacroix '88. 

.1. T. Sullivan '22. 
,1. A. Ileal '2:5. 

li. K. Qerry '88, 

I;. 11. Friend '88. 
W. F. Sellers '24. 
11. II Shepard '24. 



FIVE MORE GAMES SLATED 

FOR FRESHMAN QUINTET 
In the Greenfield name on Jan. 0, the 

Freshman basketball playeri deinon- 
sl rated I heir allround ability as court 
,,„.„. Binee thai name they have shed 
ibelr individuality with a correspond- 
ing improvement in the quality of their 
team work. Although they have be- 
fore the... what is considered a rather 
still schedule, with the assistance of 
Dame Fortune I hey should possess a 
e leaa slate at the close of the season. 

The remaining games are as follows: 
Jan. 27 Hopkins Academy, t>. re. 

.Ian. 20 Deerliel.l Academy, here. 

i-vi.. ;'. smith Agricultural school, 

here. 
I-VI,. in Smith Academy, here. 
Fch. 14— WilllSton, Faslhampton. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at lieasoniihlc Prices. 
Informal* m Spec/*/* v 

ISffje, Prospect st.. sssacrst. Mass 

Tml. 6B8-M 



S. S. HYDE 

oi>tioi«n aesmel j«»w*»i*»«* 

y Pleasant Street (up one rllitlit . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Hi* Hen Alarm* T... k» ami 0»Sf Kclial.le Makes 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing: 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

ISuyyoin piessintf ticket from It. < MSSBM » 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

Mceman exlacs. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Horn* Bro*. Nmokwmmr 

order vi.ur next Suit or Overeoat here n»». 
lies. selections «.f WooleM i" the latest V* 

Srns"«rsonb»nd. Th. htab unallOefoai 
work Is apparent .>.. (sacf ssnueetts ir> us- 



PROF. HICKS URGES 

MEN TO HIRE. 
in Chapel Friday morning , Profeseoi 

Uirks once more spoke, of the hikes 
which he will run for the benefit of the 

Htudenteon Saturdays darlog the winter 
term, and advocated that more el tbe 
■indents take advantage ol them. 

Dean Machmer tea. I the story of the 

foundation of governmeni and the 

|ndleiaJ system in I. ...el. as recorded in 

lee 18th ehapte* oi Baodae, ami •*> 
plaiaed that the ejovernmeni was much 
like our own today. 



Tailor and Maberdather. 

II Amity St. Next to Western Inion Tel.Ofti. ■<■ 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



-Oh'— 



DRAPER 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



CO-ED NOTES 



The three olnbe of Delia Phi Qamma- 

Musical, Literary, ami Athletic - last 

Friday, Saturday, ami Sunday rushed 
,i„. Meiety'i tweutj new membere. 

The results of the rushing an as fol- 
lows: Musical Club, Fvelyn Davis. 

Fiiec. Oonogbue, Maid HeMasteta, 

an.l Fliza Noyes; Literary Club, Mary 
Boyd, Marguerite Bos worth, Helen 
Cooke. Bditfa McCabe. an.l Margaret 
Saflth; Athletic Clttb, Maude lios- 
woilh, Marion Cassidy, Dorothy Drake. 
Elisabeth Farley. Lillian Fitzgerald . 

Barbara Hoke, Eleie Nlekeraoo, Elisa- 
beth Poeaeroy, Rath Putnam, Carmeta 
Sargent, ami Margaret Shea. 

The Girl Seoots met in Moekbrfdge 
Hall .Lin. 16. The regular troop meet- 
ing was omitted and the hour was 
uiven over to a talk hy Professor 

IMiclan. 

The Two-year fills' club, the S. «'. S. 
has elected the following ollicers: presi- 

dent, Phyllis Webster; secretary, Kti.el 

Put nam: treasurer. Doiothy Haskell. 
These ollicers will serve till the begin- 
alng of the spring term. 

Mr. Manna is to conduct this term a 

girls' Bible claea. Tbe Aral meeting©! 

Hie class is to he in French Hall next 

Thursday evening at half-past six. Mr. 
Banna will give a series of seven talks 
,,„ -'How We Qoi our Bible," one talk 

to he given each week. 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

StOCkingS tO Match 'wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 

THOMAS S. CHILDS SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



meoaros itub 

'273-274* High St., Ilolyoke 

Tel. WB2-WB3 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRV AND FANCY GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 hy wail. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 



*£ 



hoe 



tore 



ALUMNI - 

(iovernor Cox has appointed F. ft.. 
Farrar »W, an.l Theodore S. Bacon 'i»4, 
a, trustees of the Mate School at 
Belcbeetown. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mas* 



C*rp*rvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



No. 13 



TEN YEAR PROGRAM I"^rt of memorial MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY ACTIVITIES 
FOR N. E. AGRICULTURE BUILD,NG ' INANCES 



Many Faculty Present from Here at 
Big Agricultural Meeting in Bos- 
ton Last Week. 

At tbe big meeting of New Bafflaad 
agriculturalists beid at llorticultural 
Hall, Boston, last week, Jan. 1ft 
to 19, many members of the BtarT were 
present. The conference called by 
Governor Cox to consider economic 
problems In New England agriculture 
took place simultaneously with the lift h 
annnual union meeting of Massachu- 
setts agricultural organization!*, and 
the annual meeting of tbe N. I, Fruit 
Show. Leading agricultural men from 
New England and other slates were 
present at the conference, which form- 
ulated a teu year program for X. K. 
agriculture. On the various committees 
of the conference were several of our 
faculty and also never.il alumni. Pres- 
ident Butterrield was chairman of ths 
committee on Education; K. A. Van 
Meter was chairman of the Fruit com- 
mittee, of which F. G. SearB was a mem- 
ber; 8. B. Haskell was a member of 
the committee on Tobacco; EL F.Tosap- 
hon was secretary of tbe committee on 
Market Garden Products. At tbe Baton 
meeting, among the speakers, was H. 



Forty-one Thousand Dollars in Un- 
paid Pledges Still Due. 

The Memorial ieJidlng Exeeutive 
eoniinitiee has recently made the fol- 
lowing report on the effort! that have 
been made te eolleel pledges. <>n 
October 1st there was owed in pledges 
*44,»M.H2, a total of 1025 unpaid 
pledges. At that time, individual 
letters were sent out lo (hose who had 
pledged. Up to Jan. 1», 0,106.91 BCe 
been collected on 141 pledge*. Ahout 
100 other men have made arrangements 
about paying. Of the money thai has 
been eolleeted in the last three months, 
18% has been used to pay I a teres! 
Charge*, and expenses of eolleelio... To 
dale, the tolal ain«unt paid forhuildinu 
and equipment has been $140,770.82, 
and the tolal amount received from 
subscriptions HJ8.ieO.fJ8. The total 
amount of unpaid pledges is $41,201 .41 
and the total amount of liabilities, 
\ $28,:57».02. If all the pleduss are paid, 
there will be sl2.XM2.7tl over and above 
lial.ilili' 



ATTENDED BY ABOUT 120 VISITORS 

Sixty Present at Alumni Dinner Addressed by Professor Michels. 
OFFICERS OF ACADEMICS CLUB REELECTED SUNDAY 

The Mid-Winter Alumni Hay Program 
was ful ilhd on the campus with a 
goodly .iiimher of alumni inattendanee 
and a good amount of enthusiasm. 
Several interest in(i talks were uiven by 
i lie alumni to the students on Friday 
and Naiuidav. and are printed else- 
where in this issue. 



M. A. C. AND AMHERST BOTH 
UNABLE TO BREAK l-l TIE 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA SEMI- 
CENTENNIAL NEXT MARCH 

Recently oil the press is a hook en- 
titled "Phi Sigma Kappa, A History," 
F. Tompson on "Recent Developments - } Frank Prentlot Kami. The book. 
of the Market Garden Experiment Bte> L^^n |g published in connection with 
lion," Director Haskell on tbe "Food | lhe Beni j. ce ntei.uial of the fraternity 
Supply of New England and the Service |;on , illK in March, holds particular in- 
terest to the OOllegC in general since 



of its Agricultural Colleges," F. C. 
Sears on "Planning the Spray Pro- 
gram for 1923," W. S. Krout on "Two 
Years of Study with Apple Scab." 



the first three chapters are laid ex- 
clusively here at M. A. 0. Phi Sigma 
Kappa is tbe only National Fraternity 
to have been founded on this Campus, 
which in itself is a point of interest. 
Of the six original founders of that 
Fraternity, Dr. William P. Brooks of 
the Experiment Station staff is one. 
After Defeat at Boaton. GameMarked T()e ))u()k ifl com plete in every detail 
by Fast Play and Good Goal-tend- w m, many illustrations, and has been 
ing. Thirty Minutes Overtime. j very well' received by members of tbe 

, fraternity. 



HOCKEY TEAM STAGES COME 
BACK AGAINST WILLIAMS 2-2 



No r, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mew 



Last Wednesday evening the Aggie 
Hockey team more than made up for 
the defeat handed them the week be- 
fore by the Boston University team, 
when they held the fast Williams Col- 
lege sextet to a tie score, 2-2, in one of 
the fastest and longest games of the 
season in the sport. 

Tbe game was played in bitter cold 
weather, the thermometer registering 
well below zero, in spite of this fact 
the game was fast, both teams playing 
at their best, and tbe large crowd which 
turned out to the game was well repaid 
for its loyalty. The ice was fast and 
tbe teams were evenly matched. 

The puck was kept pretty well in the 
middle of the ice for the first few min- 
utes of play, but toward the middle of 
the first period Captain Gordon suc- 
ceeded in working the rubber by the 
two defense men and with a pretty shot 
OonUaaed oa page t 



MR. THEODORE WIRTH TO TALK 
HERE TO LANDSCAPE CLUB 



All Interested Invited to Attene on 

Next Monday Afternoon at 

French Hall 



Mr. Theodore Wirth, Superintendent 
of parks in Minneapolis. Minn., will 
address the Landscape Club on Monday 
Jan 2$). at 840 r. ■. la Krencb Hall, 
room F. He is well filled to talk on 
the practical phases of landscape hav- 
ing served as park superintendent for 
tbe last 17 years. His talk will be 
illustrated hy lantern slides. 

His visit is of special interest as be is 
tbe father of "Connie" Wirth wbols 
president of the club. All those in- 
terested are invited. 



Six Over-time Periods Tell Story of 

Second Hardfought Tie Game of 

Season. Play Fast Throughout. 

With the tie score of lhe Williams 
battle of the Wednesday before still in 
their systems the Mass. Aggie puck 
chasers went aftei the Amherst sextet 
last Saturday at hi noon on the Aggie 
rink with a new light. Hut the> were 

only rewarded with, a th ninth.- 

name ending alter six overtime periods 
with the sere 1-1. The ice was in fair 
condition, and both teams showed a 
fast brand of hockey. 

Tbe puck was kept on Hie go ftWB 
the start, but for the first period neither 
team succeeded in getting it into lhe 

net. Aggie had more chances to s< 

than Amherst, hut the good stop|> ing ol 
Leaycralt had lo he reckoned with. 

In the second period, tbe game was a 
little faster, the Aggies taking lhe ini- 
tiative and forcing the puck into the 
Amherst territory. For the lirst 10 
minutes Whitaker, (iordoti and Lamb 
bothered the Amherst goal with ch.s.- 
range shots, and in a free for all scrim- 
mage in front of the goal Whitaker 
took the puck from the side and shot 
it by Titus for the lirst score. 

Tbe Amherst team came back with a 
rush but failed to do anything notice- 
able tor tbe rest ,, I tbe period, la feet 
tbe third an.l last period Was nearly 
over, with but five seconds to play, 
when alter many unsuccessful attempts 
to storm tbe Aggie goal, tbe puck was 
brought linto a favorable position by 
Clever passing ami in t he ensuing scrim- 
mage in front of the goal the puck was 

poebed la tot lat t icing tally hj 
Captain Plumber. 

In tbe overtime periods both teams 
showed the effect of stienuoiis play leg 
and the game became somewhat slower, 
though the Aggies lost none of the for 
mer aggressiveness, constantly keeping 
Continued on page 2 



ai.i mm in vm it SA rruiiAY. 
Aliout 80 alumni were picscnt at the 
dinner held last Saturday in Draper 
Hall in connection will, lhe Alumni 
Da] ProgTMB. After dinner Prof. 

Michels spoke aboil, the present Stale 
l'nivelsil> hill before the IcgislaUnc 
and lhe outlook for the Memerlal 
Building. After reports troin tbe 
secretary and treasurer of lhe associa- 
i ion. II was voted to instruct the ex- 
.ciiiive eomu.ittee lo collect all out- 
standing pledges to the Memorial 
I'.uilding Fund by whatever means they 
could find advisable. 

A. M.I. MM IIUI.AM AST 

lhe hreaklasl ol the Academic A. 
tivilies Alumni lluh of M. A.C. was 
held al Diaper Hall on Sunday January 
^1 for the purpose ol electing ofbeers 
and discussing niallcis eoii.eining lhe 
College. The same ollicers were reelect- 
,,!:■ Boiaed H. Vorheea '<>k, Preshmeat; 
( Bayaoed Vinten 18, Vice President ; 
I;. A. Mellen •», Secretary. 

A constitution was adopted at this 
meeting. The pereeeeof the Club is to 
Continued on p»g« 4 



INFORMAL, SCHEDULED FOR 
JAN. 27, POSTPONED ONE WEEK. 

The Informal Committee annoiinreil 
on Monday hist the Informal which had 

j been scheduled for this Saturday, Jan. 
27, has been postponed one week, and 

j will be held on Saturday, Feb. :{. Due 
to quarantine regulations, the girls from 
Mt. Ilolyoke are unable to come until 
that date. 



MUSICAL CLUBS READY FOR 
REMAINDER OF SCHEDULE 



Many Good Trips Being Enjoyed and 
Anticipated by the Men. 

Having performed successfully in 
seven different concerts so far this sea- 
son, the Musical Clubs are looking for- 
ward with a good deal of enthusiasm 
to the iemaiiidei of their schedule. 

For the next concert on this Friday, 
atShelhurne Falls, tbe men are sched- 
uled to leave town on tbe IfJOr.ll. 
car for Sunderland, reaching I heir des- 
tination via So. Deerfield and Green- 
lield. They will return to Amherst 
the following day. There will also be 
;| Q}e« OH* rehearsal on Thursday 
evening at tbe regular time and pleet. 

|{t sides the original schedule of con- 
certs published recently, there has also 
been secured another engagement at 
Northampton, under the auspices of 
the Northampton Teachers' Assoela- 
tion. This concert will take place on 
Thursday, Feb. m. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



Athletics 



AMHERST GAME 

Continued from p»»e 1 



the Amherst goal in danger but to no 
avail. After six of these periods it was 
thought best to call the game as neither 
team seemed able to outplay the other, 
aud the second tie battle of the season 
went on record after a hard-fought 
battle. In the return game with Am- 
herst at their rink the teams will have 
another chance to show their metal. 
The summary: 



Willi i;-i 

Sylvester, rw 
Kingman, lw 
Titus, c 
Plumber, Id 
Jones, rd 
Leay craft, g 
Substitutions— Hilyard 



ACX.II . 

rw, Lamb 

lw, Gordon 

c, Wbitaker 

Id, Goldsmith 

rd, Bodadoa 

g, Alger 

for Lamb, 



Nicoll for Wbitaker, Tewhill for Llods- 
dos, Wilcox for Jones. Goals— Wbita- 
ker aud Plumber. Ueferee— Bergini. 
Time -three 15-minute periods. Six 5- 
roinute overtime periods. 



TUFTS VICTORIOUS AT 

MEDFORD BY 19-10 SCORE. 

Poor shooting by the visitors, coupled 
with fine teamwork on the part of the 
home team, accounts for the ltt-10 vic- 
tory of Tufts over Mass. Aggie at Med- 
ford last Saturday evening. During the 
first half the teams seemed evenly mat- 
ched but in the secoud period the good 
passing and shootingof the Jumbos gave 
them a safe lead. Their guarding was 
of the best and their defense was im- 
penetrable. Long shots over the Aggie 
defense were directly responsible for 
the defeat, several being made from 
long distances for scores. Fritz Ferranti 
worked exceptionally well from the 
foul-line while Mahoney shone for Tufts. 
Both of Aggie's floor baskets were from 
long shots. Fritz Ferranti made one In 
the first period and Eddie Bike sank one 
in the second half, both from the cen- 
ter of the court. Under- tbe- basket 
shots were almost out of the question 
with the guarding game of Wilsou, Til- 
lingbast, aud Rogers. 
Summary; 

TUFTS 



Mahoney, If 
Evans, rf 
Henderson, rf 
MMinicle, c 
Pounds, c 
Wilson, lb 
Tillinghast, lb 
Rogers, rb 



m. a. c. 



the game was nip and tuck, both trying 
long shots but none l.ciny effective, and 
the period ended in a deadlock. 

The second period began even taster 
than the preceeding one, and it was ap- 
parent from the fust that things were 
MOB to happen. Both teams strove to 
get a close shot at the cage, but good 
defensive work kept the puck pretly 
well out Of danger. The second Aggie 
fOft] came as the result of carefully 
working (lie puck up tbe let. When 
about in the center of tbe rink Justin 
front of the Williams cage Goldsmith 
made a pretty pass to Lamb in the right 
wing who lifted the puck by the goal 
tender into the net. At this point it 
looked like an Aggie victory, but be- 
fore the end of the period W. Stephen- 
son look the puck down the ice himself, 
and skating in toward the goal drew 
"Mac" Alger away from the net and 
shot the goal. From this point till the 
end of the RMM bOtB aggregations had 
what looked like good chanees to win 
the game several limes, but both goal 
tenders, realizing the situation, stopped 
attempts right and left, and the game 
ended in a lie, 2-2. 

One overtime period followed another, 
until at the end of thirty minutes of 
almost continuous playing neither team 
had succeeded in scoring; so by mutual 
agreement the aanic was called. 

The team played a decidedly different 
game from the first one against Boston 
I'niveisity, and showed that they had 
profited by their experience. Gordon 
and Lain!) proved hard men for their 
opponents to handle, while for Williams 
Hemphill and W. Stephenson starred 
with fast ikatlng and in their ability to 
carry Ihe puck. Both Alger and Lowes 
are due much credit for t heir stopping 
of many a puck on its cage-ward tliyht. 

The summary: 



WILLIAMS RELAY SQUAD RUNS 
AWAY FROM AGGIE QUARTET 



B. 


F. 


r. 


4 


2 


10 








I) 











1 





2 


2 





4 


1 


1 


1 





















A.G01 i -. 
Hilyard, lw 
Gordon, c 
Lamb, rw 

llodsdon. Id 
Goldsmith, rd 
Alger, g 



wn.i.i \ MB. 

lw, Clark 

c, Pressprich 

rw, Hemphill 

1<1, J. Stephenson 

rd, W. Stephenson 

g, Lowes 



MacCready Starts off Well, but by 
Falling Loses Ground Which Can- 
not be Made Up. 

Last Saturday the Mass. Aggie relay 
team, running their first race of tbe 
season, were decisively beaten by Wil- 
liams. The victory was so complete 
that our learn hasn't a single alibi to 
offer. They were pitted against men 
who far outclassed them, and who 
made the fast time of 3 minutes 10 3-5 
seconds. 

Their number one man, Dodge, tbe in- 
tercollegiate 220 yd. champion, opened 
up a considerable lead on Isaac, our 
first runner. "Dick" Gifford held stub- 
bornly to each precious yard but he 
could not gain on his opponent, Miller, 
who is considered nearly as fast as 
Dodge. While the third pair were run- 
ning the M. A. C. rooters were heart- 
ened by the way MacCready rapidly 
closed the gap intervening between him 
and bis mail. Doubtless he would 
have given Peirce, our last runner, an 
even break at the start if he, in bis 
eagerness, had not tripped and fallen, 
losing much of the time and distance 
which he had gained. Peirce was 
given too big a handicap to overcome, 
especially since he had Richmond, a 
iwo-minute half-miler, against him. 
This race brought out many weak spots 
which Coach Derby hopes to iron out 
before tbe triangular race with N. H. 
State and Vermont at Boston. 

There is still a lack of material for 
tbe field events, Feb. 3. A man who Is 
at all proficient in the high jump, Ihe 
shot-put, and tbe hurdles stands a 
iniubty good chance to make the team. 

The summary : 



SOPHOMORES STILL LEAD 

IN INTERCLASS SERIES 

The interclass basketball games are 
still drawing an enthusiastic following 
at the weekly meetings. Friday Jan. 19, 
the Sophomores played and won their 
third game, defeating the Juniors by 
the score 13 4. Tbe Freshman 2-Year 
game was a rather poor exhibition of 
basket ball which finally dragged out 
to the score 2»-10. Sawyer of the Fresh- 
men demonstrated his ability as a bas- 
ket shooter by caging eight floor bas- 
kets and five free trys. 

The lineups: 

'25 vb. '24. 



Goals Lamb. Gordon, Hemphill and 
W. Stephenson. Substitutes:— Nicoll 
lor Lamb; Smith for Hemphill; Coin- 
stock for Pressprich; Tewhill for Hil- 
yard. Referees:— Peacock and Xelson. 
Lime— Three 15-minute periods. — Six 5- 
ininute overtime periods. 



WILLIAMS 

1. Dodge 



1. 
I. Miller 2. 

3. Keep 3. 

4. Richmond 4. 
Time— 3 min. 163-5 sec. 

starter— L. L. Dickinson. 



M. A. C. 

Isaac 
Gifford 
MacCready 
Peirce 
Referee and 



3 19 





H. 


F. 


|> 


Bike, rb 


1 





2 


Hale, lb 











Mars Inn an, C 











Ferranti, rf 


1 


6 


8 


Barrows, If 











Samuels, If 













2 


6 


10 


WILLIAMS TIED 






Continued from psge 1 







caged the disc. The first goal served to 
put even more speed into the game, 
Williams fighting hard for the lead, and 
the Aggies were given renewed hope by 
their first tally. Not more than a min- 
ute later Hemhill, of the Williams 
team, worked the puck down tbe ice to 
the defence and with a duplicate of 
"Doc" Gordon's shot he also succeeded 
in netting a long one. From then on 



FROSH AND SOPHS WIN 

IN INTERCLASS HOCKEY. 

The Freshmen defeated the Junior 
class in tbe first game of the Interclass 
Hockey Series by a score of ri-0. Slop- 
ford, White and Clarke played well for 
Frosh, and Brunner, Carretson, and 
Regan starred on the Junior team. 

The Freshmen who played were: 
Wade, White, Moberg,Stopford, Wheeler, 
Clarke, regulars. Cormier, Anthony. 
Potter, Frazer, substitutes. 

The Juniors — Regan, Garretson, 
Rhodes, Kennedy. Darling, Brunner. 

The Sophomores also defeated the 
Seniors at Hockey on Friday, last week, 
in a very exciting an spectacular contest 
3-0. Hutehins played well for the 
Sophomores. Alexander starred for the 
Seniors and was able to keep the score 
far bek>W what it would otherwise have 
been. Kilboitrne, Gordon, Taylor, Spra- 
gue. McGeoch, Hutehins, Currier and 
Ward played on the Sophomore team. 
Alexander, Friend, Richardson, Tarr, 
Mohor, Giles and Wendell made up the 
Senior team. 



SPRINGFIELD COMMERCE 
HIGH DEFEATS FROSH 22-17. 

Saturday January 20, the Freshman 
Basket-ball team was defeated 22-17 by 
the strong Springfield-Commerce team. 
Coffey of the visitors was altogether too 
good for the frosh, he alone scoring as 
many points as the home team. Marsh- 
man, a brother of the present varsity 
captain, also put up a good game at for- 
ward. Horner and Jones played well 
for the Yearlings. Temple made the 
prettiest basket of the game when he 
scored from mid-floor as soon as the last 
quarter began. Commerce put up an 
exceedingly effective offense against Ihe 
five-man defense. Inability to cage 
fouls lost tbe game for tbe Freshmen. 

Summary: 

m. a. e. '26. 



'25. 


B. 


v. 


I*. 


Oliver, If 








Cahill, rf 


1 




2 


Simmons, c 








Fish, rg 




3 


3 


Hurley. Ig 


2 




4 


Ross, 


2 




4 
13 


'24. 








Bartlett, F. 


S.,lf 


2 


2 


Bartlett, P. 


G.,rf 


2 


2 


Salmon, c 








Weatberwax, rg 






Whitman, lg 












4 


Time— 15 


-minute 


periods. 


Referee— 


Hall. 










26 vs. 2-Year. 




'26. 


u. 


K. 


i\ 


Smiley, If 
Grayson, rl 
Sawyer, c 
Langshaw, 
Thorapson, 


2 

8 
rg 
lg 2 


5 


4 

21 

4 

29 


2-Year. 








Merchant, 
Parks, rf 


If 

1 


6 


6 
2 


Howe, c 
Stever, rg 
Tufts, lg 


1 




2 
10 


Time -20-minute 


periods. 


Referee— 


Ball. 








The standing: 








Won. 


Lost. 


% 


'25 

'26 

'23 

2-Year 

'24 


3 
2 
1 

1 




1 
2 
3 


1.000 

1.000 

.500 

.000 

.000 



P. J. Cascio *21isnow with Vaughan's 
Seed Store in New York City. 





K. 


r. 


P. 


Goodwin, 


2 





4 


Temple, 


2 


3 


7 


Jones, Smiley, 


1 





2 


Horner, 


2 





4 


Gustafson, 













7 


3 


17 


spuisoFii.n- 


OMMKBCK 








K, 


F. 


V. 


Coffey, rf 


5 


7 


17 


Marshman, If 











Meadows, If 











Ralcicot' c 


1 


1 


3 


Zamden, lg 


1 





2 


Zenstein, rg 













7 


8 


22 



INTER-FRATERNITY RELAY. 

On Friday Jan. 19: 
Q. T. V. defeated Kappa Epsilon. 
Phi Sigma Kappa defeated Delta Phi 

Alpha. 
Thela Chi defeated Sigma Phi Epsilon. 

(default) 
Alpha Gamma Rho defeated Kappa 
Sigma. 
Phi Sigma Kappa has made the best 

time so far, 2.19. 
The standing:- 

OROUP I 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
Delta Pbi Alpha 
Q. T. V. 
Kappa Epsilon 
Kappa Gamma Phi 

GROUP 2 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Alpha Gamma Rho 
ThetaChi 
Kappa Sigma 
Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Alpha Sigma Phi 



3 





2 


1 


1 


1 





2 





I 


2 





2 





2 








2 





2 





2 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio— MASONIC BLOCK— Northampton. 

Club Night Dances— popular with M. A. C. Men. 

Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



The Sunday Night Suppers 

that we have ready for you "hit the spot" 
after an afternoon in the open. 

YE AGGIE INN 

By the Campus Entrance. 



Wesley Foundation 

amherst; 
Student Life Work Bureau 

Personal interviews regarding service 
as teachers, professors, missionaries, 
rural service, pastors, agricultural in- 
structors, vocational education in home 
and foreign lands. 



F. A. 
Collmgm Avm. 



:itch 

DIRECTOR 



Cbompson's Dmelp Calks 

(irafonola and Record Hale. Good chance to 
buy a sruall-slzed Columbia (irafonola at almost 
cost price. 10-in Records. 3 for $1.04. 12.1n. 
Records. 98c. Sale opens Monday. Jan. 2»th. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



Academic Activities 

PROSPECTS FOR SUCCESSFUL 
PROM SHOW AND GOOD TRIPS 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 

Mmatmur Omvmloplng mnd Printing 



Mills Studio Phone 456-R 



Miss Logan and C. B. Johnson in the 

New Role of Understudies for 

This Show. 

A few changes have heen made in lbs 
cast for the i'rom show. James Batal 
'25 li.ts been assigned the part of Kaef- 
alo, and Theodore Grant '2o has been 
changed to the part of Eddie. 

Heretofore, understudies have not 
heen used in the college dramatic*, hut 
this year Miss Logan '25 has been 
chosen to he the understudy for ilie 
feminine parts, aud Cleon Johnson '23 
for the male roles. Both understudies 
are experienced actors and will be pm 
ent at all rehearsals so as to he pre- 
pared to take any part, should occasion 
atise. From so much excellent mater- 
ial to be used, the Prom show this year 
promises to be a success. 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 




HORRORS! 



Dandruff on those frorgeously tai- 
lored shoulder.i? Quick! get your- 
self a bottle of "Vaseline" Hair 
Tonic and stop that before your rep- 
utation is ruined. Worse still - have 
you lost a hair or two from each 
temple? Remember Uncle John's 
round and glistening pate, and be 
forewarned. "Vaseline** Hair Tonic 
is an invaluable aid in keeping the 
scalp in perfect condition. At the 
same time, it give* the niftiest, 
sleekest look to the head. 
At all drug stores »nd student barber 
shops. 

Kvery " Va«»'i«« " prndufl i'« reeom- 
muDdttd rvert.w'yrre brrauM of itt abto- 
lite purity i nd tffeetxvenen. 

Vaseline 

DEC. U S PAT orr 

HAIR TONIC 



Negotiations for the trip to Stamford. 
Conn., have already been completed 
The trips to Deerlleld, Boston, and Phil- 
adelphia are still pending. In all prob- 
ability, however, they will be taken 
during the last of March or the first ol 
April. 



A new emblem, a comedy mask, will 
be presented to each member of the 
Hoister Doisters this year, in view of 
the recent successes they have attained. 



CUMMOONICASION 

In \ M \ss kJOOMBM < '<>l.K..ii:.\, 

Dow sirs and Qentltmsn: 

1 lake back evcryl hinu 1 sed about 
my gul in assembly last week. When 
she herd what I'd gone M sed she writ 
me an awful line an when she not 
started yon eudn'l stop her noways till 
she'd writ a pace or twew what 'II go 
in tha Cal's Own number uf tha Si/hUi 
but don't no one else know no clever 
gals? 

There's Widsith Made. I reekon as 
how most every gal as ever come in 
contact with thai diriy upper lip o' 
hisn must a writ a pome about it (tha 
lip I mean not tba contact) but I ain't 
seen none of t hem. yet . 

HI eiiybudy does know eny clever 
gftll plese teil em ter send their hest 
jokes (mi I don't want em ter Mend no 
fellers) ter The AgfiS Si/nili before next 
February. 

Lovingly yours, 

Bquimy. 

ANOTHER PLEASANT DINNER 
ENJOYED BY THE COLLEGIAN 

Last Thursday evening, Jan. 1!», Ihe 
meinbeis.d I lie Cui.i.M.ux BOM<d were 
prMoal at an informal bano.net at 
Draper Hall. A general discussion as 
lo Ihe organization otitic board and 
the policy and departmental arrange- 
ment Of the paper took place to which 
Ihe guests, Dr. Cance and Mr. Hand 
offered many helpful suggestions !»•! 
are possible of immediate tea I i /.at ion. 

Tbe Iniveisiiy ot .Southern Cali- 
fornia met Peon State in tin- annual 
New Year's too* ball name al the Toiirn- 
ameul ol BOOM al Pasadena. 




Father Time is one of our best 
salesmen — 

Proves conclusively how long 
wearing Rogers Peet clothes 
really are ! 

Fabrics and tailoring that com- 
pare favorably with the very best 
custom-made. 

Prices moderate. 

Rogers Pkkt Company 

llroadway Herald Square 

at 13th St. "Four al 86th 8t 

Convenient 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 41st St. 

NKW YOKK CITY 



ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES MEDALS 



The following men received awards in last Friday's chapel ! 



Chesebrough Mf g.Co 

(consol idated) 



L. Arrington '23, 

I. W. Slade «, 

O. K. Folsom '2:$. 

C. Lindskog '23, 

U. Wendell "23, 

F. Sears '23. 

T. Snow '23, 

C. Towns '23, 

R. Friend "23, 

R. Norcross '23, 

H. E. Weatberwax '24, 



Index, Musical Clubs, < '..i.i.m.i \ ■ 
ln<Ux % Musical < lubs. Cm i i i.ia.v 

Index, Coi i.ioi a n 

Hoister Doisters 

Musical Clubs 

Musical Clubs 

Musical Clubs 

Musical Clubs, fttrftt Hoister DofotOfl 

huh,-. Rototer Dotettn 

Musical (tubs 

Sijiiih, Hoister Doisters 



(■old 
(.old 
Cold 
Cold 
Cold 
Cold 
(.old 
Cold 

Gold 

Silver 

•Silver 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

A ml other good things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 4ir,-W) Hartley. Mass 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

('nine In and try your kasi between V-00 A. M., 
Dec. 4th, and s 30 v. M., I>ei . it'.th. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Thm Rmmmll Storm 



The following M's were also awarded : 

1!)23- Captain Crayson, Abele, Mudgeit, N'owers, Tumey, Beal. Alger, Mohor, 
Sargent, Dowden, Giles, Roberto, Marshman. and Manager Whittier. 
1S)24— Salman, Harrows, Myrick. 
HUB Ifirffli — V Marx. 
The following members of the class of 1023 were awarded their aMa 

and Cohen. 



Mollis 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 

P. D. HOMANS, 

Prop. 
Tel. 489-W 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish l£anuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Kitchen 



Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



in Midi cases, an.l III justice very 
questionable, beeaaaa <>f tbe dividing 

Una of money between tlie college and 
the activity. There is truly a need of 
a change in the system at M. A.*'., 
and the above solution is not the lea-t 

desirable. 



Campus News 



Ikv.ho W. 8LA..K "28 Bdttor tn-Chlef 

I.i iiikk II. Arkinoton <U Managing KdUor 
l)i !• m:tmi;\ i IP \i>s: 



ALUMNI DAY 

Continued from pace 1 



Editorial. 

Athletics. 

Ar;nlemi< S. 
( aiiipiiH, 



I aviso w. simo ••-':( 
A i MBit i K. V> ai (iu'24 

I.I H IS II. Kin li '-'•'• 

I.i I in i; It. Ai:itr\oio\ *JB 

G bosom L. «'i" 1!< " "-'■'' 
Jons <;. linn ti 

ClIAItl.l.S r. (M.ISKH. •'"• '- T ' 
lMIIV <i. SMI I II '•.'■> 
Rl III M. Wool. 91 

L. Khancih Kknnk.oy '24 

JOMII M. WHITTIKK'28 



Faculty. 
Aliiiniii. 
Two-Year. 
Kxiliiinue and 

Commuateettont. »ai i Coaaii "■ 



Business Department. 

Owkn K. Foi-som '28 Business Manager 
Rohf.ht K. Stkkuk. '24 Advertising- Manager 
Ciikfoki. I.. ItEi.i.itN "24 Circulation Manager 
DO»AU> W. I.K» is "2r, DAVID KOXOM "2.. 
<ilI.HKHT J. HAOSSMW -'5 



Subscription ftg.OO per year. Single 
eopies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. _^ 

Entered at ••cond-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Ac<«M>te«l for mailing at special 
rate of pontage provided for In section ltOS. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



College Credit for Student Activites. 
Willi the old qaeetoa of limiting tbe 

number of activities in which a student 
may participate bj means of the 
credit system comes a new phase of the 
problem. Should .-(.liege ..<■'' toward 
a degtce be given to those wlio have 
an active part In student affair*? The 
credit system is liable to deprive an 
organization of an eflicient leader and 
place in his stead a man who is inter- 
ested and willing to five time and ef- 
fort, but who is not capable of the same 
of degree leadership. 

It is entirely possible that there is 
latent leadership in a student body 
which never crops out simply because 
there is very little visible reward 
offered. This age of materialism has 



An Academics Club. 

A new club has made its ollieial ap- 
pearaucc due to the activities of Mid- 
Winter Alumni Day. Not • T. N'. B., 
Adelphia baa taken care of that, but 
an alumni organization composed of 
those graduates who are interested in 
promoting the Academic Activities. 
Some may say "What, another club, 
haven't we enough already?" Yet a 
careful survey of the lisld will reveal 
the fact that the Academic Activities 

bave no fostering tbnr, ao vigorous 

backing, BO turn support Off energetic 
executive body to advance the under- 
graduate efforts toward a higher goal 
as the lesult of mature experience. 

The purpose of the Academic Club is 
somewhat similar lo that slated by the 
Athletic Club, pertaining to the respec- 
tive activities, of course, and composed 
of those alumni who participated in 
academics while in college. Promoting 
Academic Activities to the end that 
they may be of the greatest benefit lo 
Hie students and the college is an end 
which may be interpreted in diverse 
ways. Adverse criticism may abound 
in its discussions, but out of it all there 
is expected to come a sane construc- 
tive program, whereas lack of organ- 
ization might mean simply "crabbing" 
and then mote "crabbing" with no 
effort toward redress or betterment. 
The petty matters and personal pre- 
judices may be given outlet, and the 
broader phases and problems can be 
bandied by ■ body of alumni best lilted 
to study academic activities, alumni 
who are thoroughly acquainted with the 
technicalities of the academic system, 
and what is more important, working 
Horn a friendly standpoint. Hostile 
interpretation of ditliculties will never 
lead anywhere, and surely not to sat- 
isfactory solutions. It is certain that 
most controversies arise from misun- 
derstandings, failure !o appreciate l be 
reasons for actions, whatever they may 
he. By this new organization the 
Academic Activities are assured ot the 



moulded, he average mind to thebe^ . ^ ,„,,,„, invos . 

"'" '*•« r-j" "™l ' S '";"'": | tigation whenever necessary, 
all effort. There must be a few avei-i 

age minds which can be stimulated in- 
to action by sensing a real goal. Thus, 
a combination of the limitation of the 
activities of each individual, and the 
granting of college credit toward a de- 
gree would be a very feasible plan. 

College credit for activities is not 
Justifiable from the standpoint of mak- 
ing possible the limitation of activities 
tor the student. The justification lies 
in the characteristics of college activi- 
ties themselves which tend to promote 
self-reliance, and increase the ability 
to assume responsibility, beside afford- 
ing training in certain lines, and creat- 
ing systematic obedience. It would not 
be bard to enumerate several courses 
in the curriculum which bring ample 
credit toward graduation, but which 
require lea* tbooghl and time and are 
of smaller educational value than the 
student activities. 

The situational M. A. C. is different 
from that at many other institutions 
where the college paper is run on a 
profit basis, where the musical clubs 
are sent on long trips by alumni organ- 
izations and where athletes are amply 
compensated for their services. Col- 
lege credit would be a double incentive 



No club can exist or gain authority, 
however, if composed of few alumni 
taking little part and less interest in 
its affairs. To be a success the Acad- 
emics < lub must include in its mem- 
bership a large group of alumni from all 
classes since the hules lirst made its 
appearance and before that if acad- 
emics were in existence. It must be 
admitted that tbe elub made a feeble 
start, and was brought into existence 
by a few alumni only, yet the spirit is 
there and pushed 00 by a popular and 
capable alumnus, will perform the 
function assigned to it. 



promote the Academic Activities of the 
undergraduate body of M. A. C. to the 
end that they may be of the greatest 
benefit to the students of the College. 
Membership in tbe Club is open lo all 
alumni who participated while in col- 
lege, in undergraduate activities of the 
nature governed by the Activities 
Board. Twenty-four alumni have al- 
ready Signified their intentions of be- 
coming members.' 

The following is a list of those who 
registered M Mid-Winter Alumni Day: 
C. Wellington '74; II. A. Parsons ex-'S2 ; 
.). II. Llndsey 'Kl; H. F. Richardson 'H7; 

John S. (J lell '«.»4: A. M. Kramer '00; 

C. A. l'elers 'U7 ; Philip Smith -, .i7 ; Q. 

C. Hubbard '!>'.» ; Vincent Osinun '»« ; 

Summer Talker '04; Sidney Haskell '04; 

K. r. Caskill - 00: K. .J. Walls '07; 

Clinton King '07; Lawrence Dickinson 

'10; 11.. P Baker 11: Poland Patch 11; 

A. W. Dodge IS; K. B, Hill '12; Roger 

Vainer 12; A. F. MacDotigall 'PI; 

Clark Tbsysr 'i:i; Harold cue li; 

Paul Serex T3; A. W. Taylor T4; K. 8. 

Montague 16; W. I- Doran T".; Ceorge 

Melican '15; H. L. Pendleton '15; 

Durelle Swan 10; Charles H. Could '16; 

David Potter '!•; A. w. Spautdiag T7; 

H. A. Woistiom 17; Oliver Flint '17 ; 
Roland W. Rogers 17; EL 1). Hawley 
'18; M 0. Lasepbear TK; Weatou 

Thayer 18; H. N. Worth ley 18; Carle- 
ton Smith - 18; P. N. Lyons '18; Plmer 
Morton '19; C. D. Dunbar TO; W. F. 
I.lavin '»; Willard French 'IS; Oliver 
Roberts 19; Robert Fuller, '20; Alfred 
A. (lough '20; .1. F. Carleton '20; 
Morton B.Caaatdj 'SB? William Robert- 
son '20; 3. F. Noviiski '2d; Charles 
Boardman 'SO; C. H. Anderson '21; 

Charles II. Brown '21; Paul W. Brown 
'21; R. W. Smith '21; A. W. Peighlon 
•SI; R. A. Mel leu '21; L. K. Ball '21; 
Emerson Banians 11; .lames w. Alger 
11; Carl Bogbolt '21; II F. Paw '22; 
H. A. MacArdle '«; C. M. Wood '22; 
lieorgc White '22: H. W. Spring '22: R. 
\. Holman '22; Harold Wenisch '22: 
Frank A. (iilbert '22; C. R. Vinten '22: 
Jane P. QoM "22; Donald 8. PaCroix 
"22; P. B. Conant '22: Pdwin Warren 
'22; K. A. Barnard '22; and M. .P Mur- 
dock "22. 

ll is estimated that, inclusive of 
those who did not register, 120 were 
back for part if not all of the Alumni 
Day program. 



BOTANY NOTES 

Prof. William P. Doran '16 of tbe 
Botany Department and Experiment 
Station at New HampsbireStateCollege 
addressed tbe students and members 
of the M. A. 0. Department of Botany 
as an Alumni Day speaker on Friday 
afternoon at Clark Hall. 

Professor Doran has recently pub- 
lished an important scientific article 
and a bulletin from tbe New Hampshire 
station dealing with laboratory tests 
with regard to the toxicity of various 
substances to germinating fungusspores 
and also on the physiological relation 
to fungus spore germination. Professor 
Doian's work along these lines touches 
a new field, and is of great importance 
in tbe lield of botanical work. 



Town Hall, Amherst 
wean aay .. Th . rolirll .„. mtIlofth , 

— am. Apocolypse," 10 reels, from 

_,, , the novel l.v Vlncente Blasco 

Thursday Ifeanes. A cast of 12.500. in- 

* I eluding the fifty principals, 

headed l.y VaUatiao and 
Mat. 3. Kve A lice Terry. 
6-45. 8-30 fox Newt 



Friday 



Mat 3, Kve. 
6-4 5. 8-30 



Reginald Deany and Lillian 
Rich in "The Kentucky 
Derby." The most thrilling 
of all the turf dramas. Thrtl- 
linit with Bensations on land, 
on sea and in the air. Don't 
1 miss the (treat horse r»ce. 
Sport Review 
Urr, $.«.». in htSi||t<>rM 



e„«. .-,!„., Tom Mix. Claire Adams and 

Saturday T ony o' -just tony." 

Max Brand's novel Alcatra/. 

Hat. 3. Kve. News 

6-45. 8-30 2-rcel Sumhine Comedy 



Monday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Comtance Talmade, Harri- 
son Ford and Kenneth 
Harlaa in 
"Ths Primitive Lovsr" 
Screen Snapshots 

■Z reel Christie Comedy 

Bobby Vernoa in 

"Pardon My Glove" 



AN. HUS. CLUB HEARS FINE 

LECTURE ON GUERNSEYS 



A Distinctive Industry 

There is not anothei industry dealiuc 
with so delicate a product, requiring bo 
much care lo handle where lack of at- 
tention means so much loss, as in tbe 
dairy in dust By. 

Nor is there an industry where such 
careful provision against loss of quality 
has been made as the safe, distinctive, 
sweet, wholesome, sanitary cleanline^ 
so thoroughly and easily supplied by 
the use of 



t lie Yale Pni- 



NOTE 

Says the manager of 
veisity Rifle team : 

In the neighborhood of tiO colleges 
are actively engaged this season in 
Shooting small bore title matches by 
telegraph. 



Prof. Salisbury Gives Lantern Talk 

About thirty people attended a meet- 
ot the Animal Husbandry Club Wed- 
nesday, at Which Professor Salisbury 
gave I very interesting and instructive 
stereoptican lecture on Guernseys. Mr. 
JoHO Clark Of the Mixter Farms was to 
have spoken at the meeting, but was 
unable to attend on account of bad 
weather conditions. However, he is 
expected to speak at some meeting dur- 
ing the spring. 

After 1 he lecture a business session 
was held, at which the by-laws of the 
Club were revised 



Young boy to Whitaker who was on 
way lo Boston to have teeth replaced 
after his tete-a-tete on the hockey rink. 

'Say, mister, are you a prize 
fighter.'" 



POM. CLUB NOTICE 

The regular meeting of the Pomology 
Club, which was to be held Wednesday, 
has been post polled to Tuesday tbe SOth. 
The speaker at that time will be Prof. 
Wangh, 



Among other things tbe use of this 
cleaner entirely removes from dairy 
equipment and processes the cause of 
fishy, metallic and oily flavors to milk 
products. It is itself entirely free from 
grease, will not produce a greasy suds, 
and cleans so thoroughly and rinses so 
freely that all sour and stale odors are 
completely removed from the plant and 
equipment. 

An order on your supply house is a 
definite step to higher scoring products. 

Indian in 
circle 



It cleans clean. 



in every 
package 

Tbe J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers, 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




" O wad Home pow'r the giftie gi'e ua. 
To see ourwl'i no ithera aee ua." 



V&1M £ 



'O some men the selection of a hat in a grcnt mlveiiturc. K.NOX 
removes every element oi chance. Hats nit'tiii KNOX, and in 
Amherst, KNOX means WALSH. 




a/ m rasawti 



REV. VAUGHAN DABNEY 

SPEAKS IN SUNDAY CHAPEL 



Would Raise Moral Level of Nation. 

Rev. Yaughan llabney. of I he Second 
Congregational church of Dorchester, 
Mass. showed last Sunday that Ameri- 
ca's moral level is far too low. 

He compared America's prosperity to 
the great liner Majestic, and America'* 
moral standing to the refuse scows that 
carry New York's rubbish. 

He said that intellectual, not physical 
leadership was needed, and that men 
today are looking to moral leaders 
rather than to material leaders for aid. 



M. A. 



C. C. A. CABINET 
ELECT NEW PRESIDENT 

Out of the one hundred and fifty 
Christian Association members on the 
campus, there was a distinct lack of 
interest shown in the voting al the pro- 
posed election of a new president last 
Saturday. Consequently iheC. A. cabi- 
net has deemed it n soe ssaiy lo call a 
special meeting in which they then- 
selves will elect a new president. 

Attention is called to the first lecture 
of Mr. Sanaa*! course for women stu- 
dents on "How We Qui Our Bible'' 
which will be held this evening. Wed- 
nesday .Ian 24. at 6:10 P. M in the 
French Hall library. 

"FRUIT PRODUCTION" WELL 
DISCUSSED BY CLARKE 10 



NOTE 

All Juniors and Seniors interested in 
their standing for academic medals will 
get in touch with Prof. Hand and find 
out their status. The students are ad- 
vised to attend to this al once and re- 
move all doubt. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Mr. J. W. Raeaell, Jr. of Winchester, 
Mass. spoke to the Winter School vege- 
table gardening studenlsTuesday morn- 
ing January M, 1028 on the subject, 
"Growing Celery for Pale Winter Mar- 
ket". Mr Hussell is one of the largest 
celery growers in the State, (.rowing 
about IMI acres yearly. It requires SCO,- 
(MHI feet of lumber to build the celery 
storage pits, which, when lOO) plated, 
are 24 feet wide and if placed end to end 
would measure :i.»HMl feel in length. 



A I a Conference of the Advisory 
Committee Of Cranberry Growers held 
in Wareham last Thursday, Director 
Haskell and Prof. ('. 1. (iunness repre- 
sented the College. Professor finances 
gave the results of t he experiments he 
e. lined on in the ravine this summer 
with a Dumber of spray pumps lent by 
various manufacturers. The pump 
tesis, which will later be summarised 
la a bulletin, are of special Interest to 
cranbeny growers. 



Assembly Topic of Much Interest to 
PomologiBts. 

At the regular Assembly Jan. 17. Mr. 
Waller Clarke '10 gave an interesting 
talk on tbe "Future in Fruit Produc- 
lion". He gave figures that ■bowed 
that tbe number of fruit trees had been 
decreasing in the last few years bul 
that tbe number of barrels of frail pro- 
duced was on the increase. He said 
that be thought this was due to tbe 
fact that the trees were getting better 
care and that the farmers were learning 
to handle tbe problems of growing bet- 
ter. Cooperation, the speaker thought, 
would solve tbe problem of the grower 
who bad difficult j in getting rid of bis 
product. He gave Illustration to show- 
how the fruit growers of New York had 
organized and were putting their goods 
in some of tbe best stoies in and around 
the large cities. He believed there was 
an opening for any man who had the 
ability lo go in that kind of work. Mr 
Darke has bad a wide experience in 
developing a large farm in Milton. X.Y., 
and as a result handled his subject very 
well. 

FRESHMAN CLASS ELECTS 

A. V. BUCKLEY PRESIDENT 

At a recent meeting of the Freshman 
(lass, after Assembly, the following 
'-tticers were elected to serve during 
'he winter term: President, Arthur Y 
Buckley of Natick; vice-president. 
Raymond D. Smiley of Worcester: sec- 
retary, Margaret C. Shea of Holyoke : 
Measurer, Francis J. Cormier of New- 
tonvllle; historian, James P. Williams 
of Glastonbury, Conn.: captain, Paw- 
renceL. Jones of Brockton; sergeant- 
at-arms, Louis A.Gavin of Natick. 



Dr. J. K. Shaw of the Pomology De- 
pertment went to W orc e st er laet Tues- 
day to testily as an expert witness in a 
suit involving some frozen apples. 
Wednesday Jan. 24 he is lo speak in 
Hartford before the Connecticut Nur- 
serymen's Association. 



Sylvester J. Broderiek of Kxeter, X. IP 

a graduate in '22 from the N. IP State 
College, has just joined the stall of the 
Experiment Station as an analyst in the 
Fertiliser Laboratory. 



CO-ED NOTES 

At the (Jirl Scout meeting of Jan. l»i, 
Professor Phelan spoke on leadership in 
country life. IPs talk was very inter- 
esting and those who heard it secured 
I great many new ideas. The course 
in scouting will soon be completed. 
Probably three more meetings will he 
held. 

A mysterious publication has ap- 
peared al the Abbey and numbers 
among its subscribers practically all the 
co-eds. It is called, very fittingly, the 
"Baepberry." Its first issue came out 
Sal unlay and it is to be published twice 
a month. 

Delta Phi Camina hail a coasting 
party last Saturday for the members of 
the S. C S. The girls left Hie Abbey 
at «-?,!) and returned not long after in a 
downpour of rain. They decide not to 
let the rain spoil their evening and had 
just as good a time at an indoor part} 
as they could have c oast ing. 

A 1006,000 drive for a memorial gym- 
nasium and armory at the Pniversily of 
Maine was started recently by the 
Alumni Council. Tbe building will he 
dedicated to the 41 Maine men who 
died in tbe War. 



The Time Is 

Here 
To Feed Up 



TITH $40.00 worth of 
r j^t>c>d Buffalo Corn 
Gluten iced and Diamond 
Corn Gluten Meal Mixture, 
well fed with good roughage, 
you can produce at current 
prices $170.00 worth o( milk. 

These feeds to be found in 
every good dairy ration and 
in every live dealer's stock. 

CORN PRODI CTS REFINING CO. 

New York Chicago 



I 



/'rot. III 



»00 POOWQs M „j 



J(i Protein 



£i^MO sV * et t 



too 



**«dSfkiIS*l 

a2i^ae|twwro»« »** 

r,L r Mmmim to* 
''gf jtttssst a s- 



awns 3J"13oiX Vfol 



VrSt HO 



tfco* 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



ANNIVERSA RY SALE 

All our Overcoats are put in two lots $ 2 2.66 and $27.66 

and priced at __ MM «.— — — ^— ^^~ 

High-grade Suits $27.66 

Flannel Shirts $2.79 

Plaid Profile Shirts $4.05 

These and many other notable reductions do not 
make it nearly so hard on the old bankroll. 



Faculty 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct — MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

The House of A ii />/>< nli rimer Good ( lot lies 



Have Yo 



u 



Old Dcerfield fertilizers 

" /Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfielo. Ma*s 



FACULTY NOTES 

Prof. Patterson's Readings. 

Professor Patterson g«TC a very line 
readmit «>f SsakespeareV'The Merchant 
of Venice" before ibe members and 
friends of the Graduate Club last Wed- 
nesday availing in Memorial Hall. 
A limit t00 people were present, and if 
I he applause and comments made are 
any indication the reading was well 
worth while. Professor Patterson did 
not use any manuscript whatsoever, 
and hehl the interest of bis audience 
throughout his reading. 

Professor Patterson read •'Othello"' at 
the Unity Church Sunday evening. He 
plans to read "Hamlet" for those tak- 
ing bis EaflUfa courses, and for any 
other students who care to attend. This 
reading will come some eveninit next 
week, and Professor Patterson will 
announce the dale in his elass. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



THE 



Choke of a Career 

From the Yale News 



THE NINETY-FOUR 

Someone, probably an insurance 
agent, was quoted recently as saving 
that from the mass of one hundred 
college graduates one individual only 
rose to the Polo and butler class, peril- 
ously near the top of the financial lad- 
der. Five others became comfortably 
off and found themselves after twenty 
years at the small yacht and chauffeur 
stage. The other ninety-four presum- 
ably congregate in the great section of 
the American people who drive their 
own Buicks to the golf club. In other 
words, dreaming about being a rich 
man is one thing, and making the grade 
is "something else again." 

Yet the n'r.ety-four presumably work 
just as hard as the sumptuous six. Their 
business is the axis on which a small 
and uninteresting world revolves. They 
have become devotees of the dollar 
and when that fickle deity deserts, have 
nowhere else to turn. Jammed in a 
dull, straight rut of business they can 
never leave the road and jump the fence 
into finer fields of life. This, then, is 
the portion of ninety-four men out of 
every hundred now on the campus. 

The answer to the problem lies in 
the proper choice of a career. 



Between now and Commencement 
we shall have something to offer on 
the subject of "Careers." Watch for 
the space with the Famous Signature. 



Life Insurance Company* 

or Boston. Massachusetts 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - • Masa. 



— TRY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for lirHt -class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

II Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass. 



Dr. William P. P.rooks, consilium; 
nuriculiurisl ol the Kxperiinent Million 

stntv, It ■pending a iince months men* 

ion with relatives in the South. 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 

Rmlneomlm 
suits rtUMtm, Military Tallorlnir 



OVKK ADAMS' DIM .. BTOKK 

A. MIENTKA 
Shorn Rmoalrlna While U Wall 

NEW CHICKS 

Men's Whole Sulen. RaktMf Heels . $2.50 

Men'a Half Bole*. Bnbber Hceli $1.75 

Mi-h'h Rubber Soles. Kutilier Deelo $2.25 

M.n's Hair Sales $|.35 

Work (Iwi i MK AMHKMT HOUHK 



Got Your Basketball Schedule? 

Help yourself in 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Owried and operated by Aggie men for Aggie men. 



W. B. DRURY I Amherst Fruit Store 



Miss K«lna Skinner. Miss Maiyerel 
Hamlin, and Mrs. John Phelan last 
Saturday afieim.oii at Mrs. Phelan's 
home gave their annual tea tor the 
faculty ladies and women students. 
Mrs. Sears. Mrs. Marshall, Mrs. Skinner 
and Mrs. (.ore poured tea and chocolate 
fol the uuests. About 00 attended. 



io Main Street. 



After Every 
Meal 



ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

I iL'ars and(ljtaiette»-S|.e. ia. prte* per r.ntoii 

M Clgarattea. 

i l.iatrt'8 ( 'boeoliites and other lea<liuu' line* 
Cracker* and Omnnmd Good* 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

The studeni oi f a ni/.at ion of New York 
ruiversily has passed a lcsolutioii 
nivins: members ol the New York Uni- 
versity Set''* Staff t**0 seineMer hours' 
eiedit for their work on the paper. 



11 



PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS! | 

Are I'pitiiinent Annum tin- ™ 

Kalinin* Make* We Feature — 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING z 
At $1.55 

is a good **1N for women wlm want the best 

tbere is in m seamless stocking that yet 

will lit the ankles tiimly. 



C*' 



hfi 



fc 



>? 



rV 



i^y. 



G. EDWARD FISHER = 



The 
Flavor 

Lasts 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, ThurH- 

<i ay, Saturday, 8-00 A. H. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your heau's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

IT'SA HAPPY FEELINCJSN'TJT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



e-** - 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 



'I'll nis.. Ki'i. and 
Sal.. 

.Ian. *S,SB,S7 

Mon. and Tues . 
.Ian. '.St. M 



RODOLPH VALENTINO in 
"THE YOUNG RAJAH" m _ 

with Wanda HawUy. Charles Orfle and Bertram Graiby 



" THE COWBOY AND THE LADY" 

with 
BETTY C0MPS0N and TOM MOORE 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

II 1-2 Amity St- 

Amherst Book Store 



STATION I R 



y/J^A 



Alex's Lunch Room 

Formerly of the Candy Kitchen. 
OVER BOLLES' SHOE STORE 



SPECIAL NOON-DAY DINNERS AT 50c- Food and Service of Highest 
Quality- The Best Coffee in Town— Huy a $5.50 Meal Ticket for $.\00 

Hours, 7 \. m. to 1-00 A. M. 

The place that made good over night—" Come up and bring your fn« 



Just received a new 

Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal 
•Vr, called "The Dyplomatic." 

See our window. 



Short Courses 



SACRED HEART QUINTET TRIM 
TWO-YEARS IN FIRST GAME 

The two-year basketball team lost 
their lh«t gMM "I tho aasSOS when 
they VMM defeated bjf Na.-iv.l Mean 
Higb B4-8 last Wcilncsclay aVSBlBg at 
llolyoke. The fact that the short 
eOUIM men tailed to make a single l.as- 
ket limn tlie Moor aeceaaarllj resulted 
in a small seore. I.ut t hey wen- al.le to 
make eit;lit points from fouls. Sacie.i 
Mean .olleeted 14 floor haskets ami 

added at i more points t lom fouls, ftob- 
arti ami Barka bales, bigs scorers with 

i'iyht ami live haskels apieie 

The two-year men were quite at sea 
on tlie bt| BOUT, an. I were f,.ne«l t.. 

change theii defeeea lo i i , ,li- 

tions. liarnielewas elected eapiain of 
the team just previous to Hie jjaine. 
The i wo year line-up was : 

Uarniele, it 

Merchant, If 

rarsoiiH. c 

Tufts, ru 

Uurnetl. 1^ 

Stover, tk 

Conklin, \i> 

Oulhuse, Ij,' 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Huilding, 
If. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Academic Activities, 
The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 
Football Assot i.uion, 
Track Association, 

The Collegian, 
Hotkey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister I kristers, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical ( Inbs, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

I clt|il f 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 
Richard Mellen, Manager 175 | 

C. s. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 

Frank P. Rand, Manager 136 R 
Roger I?. Ft lend, Prasidenl 
Perry G. Barttett, kfanagei 

John M. Wliittier, Manager 
Charles \V. Steele, Manager 
Irving W. Slade, Kditor 
Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 
Philip B, Dowden, Manager 
(iustav Lindskog, Manager 
Trescott T. Abele, Kditor 



720 

170 

1 70 

8336 

53° 

XC 1 W 



Thonai L. Snow, Manager 



Manager Thomas has ainioiineeil liis 
(schedule for the season, which is as 
follows: 

Jan. -11 \\'illnaliain,at Kasl hampton. 
Jan. U Deerlield at home. 
Fob. It— Wilbrahain at home. 
Kel>. If— Deerlield al Deerlield. 
Feh. 17 Clarke School at Not t hampton. 
Felt, il— Willislon at home. 

There are several dales still open on 
1 he schedule. 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

Tryouts for the Winter Sehool play 
were held last Monday evening in Me 
rnorial balidleg under the direetion of 
Prof. Patterson. The results will he 
aiinouneed later as well as the plaj 
whieh is to he given. 



The Kolony Kluh held a house danee 

last Betardaj afteroooa and evening. 

about l.lcmiples attending. Miss Kami". 
from .Smith and Mrs. Marsh from the 
Abboy Bated as chaperoned. 



720 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, Owen K. Kolsoin, M riagei 8314 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard B. Smith, Manager 8314 
M. A.. C. Christian Association, Frederick II. Cook, President 8330 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Satulow, Managet 

Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask us to show you whatever you may DC 
interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing* because we are doing business on this 
basis. U. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high grade 

SHOE EEPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heeds, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1.70 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 cts per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are Goodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 



NOVICK & SOCKUT Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Custom Tailors 
Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 1 , , 

xeativa,,,^,,,,,,,,,, Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 



Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 



C. F. DYER 



Plumbing and Heating 



Dress Suits for Hire. THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-3 






.f,1< 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 24, 1923. 



better~Than ever 

Just received a new shipment of Spring Dressy Worsted Suits-the ktnd you 

seldom find in 'Ready-Mades. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. <& GAULT 

^ College Outfitters. 



FLORICULTURE NOTES 

The Floriculture Department is to 

bold ;i Carnation Day oa M>. • '" 

French Hall, rarttaai detail* will ba 

Mi\.'ii in next week's Coi.i.t-oi an. 



Mr. B. 0. Fontaine, of the Cord A 
Buriiham Company, New York City, 
yave an illustrated lecture in French 
Bail on Jan. 2:5. He spoke to i he flori- 
culture elaaaaa on "Graaaboaae Coa- 

suueiion", and used lantern tildes i<« 
illustrate his lecture. 



(,, the students on Saturday morning on 
•opportunities in Floriculture". He 
told about his own personal experi- 
ences si. ite he graduated, aad his talk 

was very interesting. 



Mr. II. 11. Patch, M. A. C. '11, talked 



The Department of Floriculture is 
ii..w workinii up a new correspondence 
COM— on "Commercial Floriculture", 
ooatalalag 24 lessons, the first of which 
will he ready lor dislrihulion within a 
few .lays. The course is intended for 
those Who want to know something 
about commercial floriculture and 
fteeahottM work. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prices. 
Informal* m Spmclmlty 

Yi So. Prospect St.. Amberet. Mass 

Tml. BBB-M 



S. S. HYDE 

optiotan ««»d J»w«n»i* 

<i Pleasant Street (up one Hhibt . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

BtK Hen Alarm ( locks ;in«l other Reliable Make* 



NORFOLK SUITS 

Grays, browns and mixtures, in weight suitable for year 'round 
wear. Special reductions to clear our stocks for Inventory. Feb. ist 

These are worth looking over. 

Priced from $26.00 up j 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Expert Military Tailoring 

mill < Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Bai your prt-SHlii: ticket from It. (iani/.ie « 

FULL DUESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all tbe 

„„ mmn ftxtaaa. TO BENT or FOR SALE 

Horn* Brom. Neckwmmr 

order your next Suit or Overcoat bere nov.. 
»e«t Hele t ion" of Woolens in tbe latest pat 
ernsal«ayKnn band. Tbe »i*b Muality <. ou, 
work isapiwrent on fancy tfarments lr> us. 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdasher. 

11 An.itySt. Next to Western Union Tel. Office 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



—OK — 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICKS 

Stockings to Match 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



THOMAS S. CHILDS SING LE 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



INCOIU'OKATKI. 

273-279 High St., Uolyoke 

Tml. WB2 W63 



Main Street 

Quiok Laundry 






Fountain Pens 

Ink 

Kodaks 

Genuine Eastman Film 

Victrolas 

Victor Records 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

PKAI.ERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

SI .10 by mall. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 «P- 
See them in our window 



« 



hoe JStore 



Carpenter St Morehoust, 
PRINTER, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



No. 14 



MUSICAL CLUBS MAKE 
GOOD AT SHELBURNE FALLS 

Harry J. Talmage '22 Influential in 

Securing the Trip and Providing 

for the Men. 

On Friday last, Jan. 26, tbe Combined 
Musical Clubs journeyed to Sbelburne 
Falls, Mass., where they performed at 
a concert given under tbe auspices of 
the Meu's Club of the Congregational 
Church of the town. The concert was 
attended by about MO townspeople, 
which number would have been much 
larger but for the very bad travelling 
on tbe roads to the outlying sections 
of the town. 

Tbe concert was arranged for largely 
through the influence and efforts of 
Harry J. Talmage, who graduated from 
the college last year and is now teach- 
ing at Arms Academy. Mr. Talmage 
took charge of the men when they 
arrived in town Friday afternoon, show- 
ing them to the various homes where 
they were entertained for the night. 
The men appreciate the warm hospi- 
tality which was shown them by the 
townspeople without an exception. 

The regular program was put on by 
the clubs, with the exception of the 
readings of Weatherwax, who was un- 
able to be present and who wai de- 
cidedly missed. There was no dancing 
after the concert. The men returned 
to Amherst the next morning. 

RUSSIAN QUARTET SINGERS 

TO APPEAR HERE SUNDAY 

The Russian Cathedral Quartet is to 
give a concert in Bowker Auditorium 
next Sunday afternoon at 3-30 r. M. 
under the auspices of tbe Social Union. 
The quartet has sung in New York, 
Boston, Montreal, Baltimore, and many 
other places, and wherever it has gone 
it baa received a hearty welcome. The 
quartet is highly recommended, and 
tbe concert Sunday should be well 
worth attending. 



DR. WILLIAMS OF NANKING 
ON "SITUATION IN CHINA" 



China in Her Industrial and Political 
Revolution, Needs all Our Assis- 
tance, Especially in Education. 

Dr. J' E. Williams, Vice-President of 
the University of Nankiug, China, 
spoke in Wednesday Assembly on Jan. 
24, concerning the situation in China 
today. He brought out the fact that 
China is going through much the same 
formative stage as did tbe American 
Colonies during and after the Revolu- 
tion. However he believes China has 
greater ditliculties to overcome and 
therefore should be given more time. 

He showed bow much China is in- 
debted to tbe United States for righting 
the wrong done to China in the Treaty 
of Versailles. He also pointed out 
Continued on p*g« 4 

WESLEYAN TAKES FAST GAME 
FROM VARSITY QUINTET 18-17 



AGGIE HOCKEY SEXTET BAGS VICTORIES IN 
FAST GAMES WITH CORNELL AND OSTEOPATHS 

» 

Cornell Surprised Saturday by Score of 3-2, and Their Fast Work 
Fails to Stop Visitors' Free Passing. 



POULTRY JUDGING TEAM IS 
FOURTH AT NEW YORK SHOW 



High Individual Honors for Sharpe 

'23 and Steele '24. Penn State 

Wins First Place. 

The Mass. Aggie Poultry Judging 
team drew fourth place in the contest 
held in New York last Friday. Repre- 
sentatives from West Virginia, North 
Carolina, New Jersey. I'enn. Stale 
Connecticut, and Massachusetts panic 
ipaled in the judging, which was won 
by l'enn. State. Our team achieved 
distinction through the work especially 



Barrows High S"or*r for M. A. C. 
Wesleyan Overcomes 5-Point 
Lead in Last Minute Rally. 

In a fast and furious game played at 
Middletown last Wednesday the Wes- 
leyan basketball team defeated the 
Mass. Aggies by a one-point margin. 
Each team made the same number of 
floor baskets and one from the foul line 
proved to DO the deciding factor. The 
Bay Staters were ahead most of the 
game but in the last few minutes the 
Nutmeggers made the counting points 
in a fast rally. Barrows was high 
scorer for the visitors while Moon- 
counted most often for the home team. 

With three minutes to play Aggie 
was live points ahead, but two double 
fouls called on them were scored by 
Moore, adding four points, and just 
before tbe whistle Feiler, fresh in the 
game, shot a long one over the defense, 
leaving Wesleyan in the lead. 

Summary: 

WK8I.KYAN. 



Having bad thai! till of tie SOON 
names, and not content with one win 
to their credit, the Mass. Aggtt puck 
chasers journeyed to Ithaca, N. Y., last 
Saturday afternoon, and from 2-30 on 
they gave the Cornell sextet the fastest 
game Of hockey that has been |da\ ed 
on thai rink in many a moon. It was a 
whirlwind name tnmi start to (inish, 
and when the linal whistle was blown 
it was found lhat (he Annies led by 
the score ot 3-2 It was a big dav for 
the Aggie team, and every man felt sat- 
ihlied with Ihe results. 

The lirst tally ot the game was the 

raaoll oi some clever paaatai aad ax- 

.client team work Ofl Hie part of i he 
invaders, which took the puck in front 
Ofl the Cornell goal. 'Doc" Cordon, 



of Sharpe '23, who tied with a l'enn. 

Slate man for high individual honors in with a pretty shot i , he ,,„„,, . caged 

utility judaln. Steele also tied for | U.« p.u-k. For the res, of tbe l.rst per- 



second place in standard judging with 
one of the Connecticut team. Tbe men 
comprising our team were: 

0. CO. Sharpe '23 

C. W. Steele '24 

J. S. Bennett '23 

mm i ^ 

C. G. Sharpe of tbe present Senior 
class is serving as an apprentice teacher 
at the Essex Couuty Agricullural 

School. 



MR. THEODORE WIRTH TELLS 
ABOUT MINNEAPOLIS PARKS 



STEVENSON 24 ELECTED NEW 
PRESIDENT OF M. A. C. C. A. 

Harold D. Stevenson, 24, of Camden, 
Me., was elected President of the Chris- 
tian Association, for the remainder of 
the school year, at a meeting of the cab- 
inet held recently, to fill tbe vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Fred B. 
Cook '23. Stevenson has always been 
interested and active in the woik of the 
Association on the campus. He is a 
member of the Honor Council, and has 
done fine work iu track while at college. 
He is a member of Alpha Gamma Rho. 

Captain Dwight Hughes of the 2nd 
Cavalry will arrive today in Amherst 
from Fort Riley, Texas, to remain here 
as a member of the Military Depart- 
ment. 



Robinson. If 

Conway i rf 

Moore, c 

King,rb 
Feiler, rb 
Frickle, lb 



1 
2 

1 
1 



M. A. 



K. 
t) 


4 





o 



r. 



Bike, rb 
Hale, lb 
Marsh man. c 
Ferranti, If 
Barrows, rf 



1 

t) 
2 

1 

8 



o 

(t 



p. 

4 
I 

§ 
(i 
2 

I 

18 

i\ 
2 

4 
I 
f5 

17 



Score at half time-M. A. C. 9, Wes- 
leyan 6. Referee-Johnson. Time-20- 
minute halves. 



Landscape Club Well Entertained by 
Father of "Connie" Wirth. 

Mr. Theodore Wirth. Superintendent 
Of tbe l'ark System in Minneapolis, 
spoke Monday afternoon at tbe Land- 
scape Club meeting in French Hall. 
Besides showing some very good slides 
of the city parks, Mr. Wirth sketched 
the progress of the l'ark System of 
Minneapolis. 

lie told how public opinion bad been 
made to favor a large park system. In 
spite of considerable opposition at lirst 
the city has been able to establish more 
than four thousand acres of parks. 
This land cost tbe city ten million 
dollars and today is estimated to be 
worth forty million dollars. This gives 
the city one acre of park land for each 
nine acres of land devoted lo other uses, 
and one for every one hundred persons. 
Mr. Wirth's talk was extremely in- 
teresting and the good sized crowd that 
turned out was well entertained. The 
speaker was especially interesting to 
the students as he is the father of 
"Connie" Wirth, the president of the 
club. 



iod the pucK was kept wcii in inid-i.c 
and neiihci -goal was threatened lo any 
extent. 

With only a lew minutes of play in 
the second period. Nesl.it ol the local 
team dribbled neatly down the ice and 
unaccompanied shot the puck past 

Alger. This Had the aeon bat aol lot 

long. Again "Doc" Cordon proved bis 
in, Mile as captain ol Mass. Aggie, when, 
after iccciving a pretty pass from a 
scrimmage iu front of the Cornell goal, 
lie again outguessed Staintoii and shot 
the second Aggie score. From Ibis 
point tbe game look on new life, Cor- 
nell striving to avenue I he last goal, and 
Aggie determined that ihey should not. 
Pretty work by Wbiiaker and Cold- 
saaitb kepi the puck on the jump, and 
many threatening shots were hurled at 
the home goal, which Stainton turned 
aside. Tbe second period ended with 
the score 2 1, in Aggies's favor. 

In the third period, after taking the 
puck from a lively scrimmage in fronl 

ot bis ova goal, "Doe" agaia, dribbled 

down the ice, with most of tbe Cornel- 
Continued on p»ge 2 



PROF. PATTERSON TO READ 
"KING HENRY IV" TONIGHT 

Prof. I'atierson of the English depart- 
ment will read part one of Shake- 
speare's "King Henry IV", on Wednes- 
day, Jan. 31. at MQ P. K„ in tbe upper 
hall <»f the Memorial building. The 
meeting is for students only. The time 
is set at an early hour so that those 
who desire lo attend the special picture 
presented at tbe town ball Wednesday 
and Thursday may attend this reading. 

Due to the special request of Prof. 
Rand, tbe reading of " Hamlet", which 
was announced in last week's Coi.i.ko- 
ian, will be postponed to a later dale. 






X 















The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



Athletics 



HOCKEY TEAM WINS 

Continued from page 1 



liiin team behind him, and lifted 
another into the caife. This marked the 
end of the Aggie seorlog, but near the 
end of the period Neshit, with some 
pretty pantos again succeeded in net- 
inu' a goal. With little time to go, the 
game was practically over, and neither 
team did anything more. 

It was the third strait; ht defeat which 
the Cornell team DM heen iianded, and 
proved a hitter pill, as they anticipated 
an easy contest. 

Seedless to say Gordon and Neshit 
were the stars of the game each scoring 
all their team's points. The Invading 
Aggies showed superior passing and 
belter team-work, which proved the 
factors necessary for a win. 

The summary : 

M \-s. AUOIK. 

Alger, g 
Hodsdon, Id 
Goldsmith, rd 
Whitaker, c 
Guidon, Iw 
Lamb, rw 



CORKBMj. 

g, Stai ii t on 

Id, Tone 

rd. Nesbit 

c, Brock way 

lw, MacDonald 

rw, Frost 



Goals — Gordon :t, Neshit 2. Referee— 
Brown of Toronto. Time— Three 15- 
minute periods 



From this time on the uaine did not 
lose any of its former interest but neither 
team scored, and the final whistle found 
the Agfftefl winners, 1-0. 

The game was marked with clean play- 
ing on the port of both teams, and had 
there been good ice a much taster game 
would have heen the result. 

The summary ; 

AOC1IKS VMKIUCAN OHTKOl'ATIIS 

Whitaker, Uilyard, c 

c, Johnson, ('apt. 
Lamb, N'ieoll, rw rw, J. Colpitis 

Gordon, Copt, lw lw, Rutherford 

Goldsmith, rd rd, O'Connor 

Hodsdon, Tewhil), Id Id, Mitchell 

Alger, ■ (, Mouiton 

Otlicials; Referee — Hunter of Amherst. 
Timer A I Smith. Time— Three 12-inin- 
ute periods. 

Coal — Gordon, M. A. C. 
Sere- M. A, C. 1-A. S. of O. 0. 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO AND PHI 
SIGMA KAPPA LEAD IN RELAY 



Championship Race to be Run 
This Week. 



off 



FRESHMEN NUMBER TWO MORE 
QUINTETS AMONG VICTIMS 



Hopkins and Deerfield Fall Before 
Attack of Temple and His Mates. 

The Mass. Aggie Frosh basketball 
team defeated the Hopkins tive here 
last Saturday by a score of 41-14. 
Though there is much room for improve- 
ment, the Freshmen clearly outclassed 
their opponents, Hopkins having no in- 
dividual stars, while Temple's uncanny 
shots alone would have won for Aggie. 

Wauezyk. Hopkins midget forward, 
added interest to the game by his shifty 
dribbling, bewildering the home de- 
fence time and again. 

The line-up : 



1 ItKHIIMKN. 

Temple, If 
Sniffeu, rf 
Jones, c 
Gtistafsnn, lb 
Smiley, rb 



HOPKINS, 

if, Waue/.yk 

rf, Hazora 

c. Flaherty 

lb. McQuestion 

rb, Howal 



FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 
STILL LEADING IN SERIES 

The Freshmen have taken the lead 
in the interclass race by defeating the 
Seniors Friday to the tune of 23 to 4 on 
Jan. 26th. The game was the Fresh- 
men's all the way through, but was 
nevertheless a good game. The 2-year- 
Junior game was more closely con- 
tested, but the Janiors finally won by 
the score of 1H to 12. 

The lineups: 

1!>23 vs. 1920 



M. A.C. 1-A. S. O. 

Last Tuesday, January 23, the Aggie 
Hockey team stopped the fast American 
School of Osteopathy sextet .on the rink 
here in a close but slow game with a 
score of 1-0. The Osteopaths, hailing 
from Kirksville, Mo.. Stopped here to 
take on our learn and that of our neigh- 
bors, Amherst, during a tour of eastern 
United States and Canada. 

Up to the time of the game it was 
doubtful whether it would be played or 
not, as the rink was in very poor shape, 
due to the rains of the previous two 
days. Many air holes ami bad ice made 
the play very hard for the players, and 
time after time feature plays were stop- 
ped by a fall on the ice. Both teams 
however were on equal standing anil in 
spile of the handicaps each did its best 
to show speed and skill. 

The puck was kept near the center of 
the rink for the tirst few minutes of play, 
but toward the end of the tirst period 
the visitors forced the play and carried 
the puck into a scrimmage at the Aggie 
goal. However, the puck was brought 
out with no damaging results, and the 
first period ended with 00 score. 

At the beginning of thesecond period 
the Osteopath! came back with a rush. 
and kept constantly peppering the 
Aggie goal, lint to no avail. Many well- 
meant passes were stopped by the poor 
ice, though some of their shots went ra- 
ther wild. The second period was just 
getting well under way when Captain 
Johnson, of the A. O. S. took the puck 
down the right side of the rink and with 
a long diagonal shot from the right 
wing sent the puck seemingly into the 
net, but it struck one of the iron up- 
rights on one side of t lie front of the 
goal and bounced out away from dan- 
ger, although many believed thai it was 
a goal pure and simple. 

It must be admitted that it was a 
close call, however, and it put a bracer 
into the Aggie sextet. Not many min- 
utes later, Captain "Doc" Gordon took 
the puck through the rive visitors and 
was not even provoked at the presence 
of a goal tender, who saw the puck only 
when some one told him to fish it out 
of the net. It was the only tally of the 

ame and a pretty one. 



l'hi Sigma Kappa ami Alpha Gamma 
Rho are leading their respective groups 
in the interfraternity relay as a result 
Of the races run off this past week. 
The results are as follows: 

On January 22 
Delta Phi Alpha defeated Kappa F.psi- 

lon (default). 
Kappa Oamma l'hi defeated C» T. V. 
Alpha Gemma Rho defeated Thela Chi. 
Sigma l'hi Epeilon defeated Lambda 
Chi Alpha. 

On January 2(5 

l'hi Sigma Kappa defeated Q. T. V. (de- 
lault). 

Sigma l'hi Kpsilon defeated Kappa 
Sigma (default). 

Theta Chi defeated Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Alpha Gamma Rho defeated Alpha 
Sigma l'hi (default). 

On January 2t> 

Alpha Gamma Rho defeated Lambda 
Chi Alpha (default). 

Theta Chi defeated Alpha Sigma (de- 
fault). 

Sigma Phi Kpsilon defeated Alpha Sig- 
ma Phi (default). 

Kappa Kpsilon defeated Kappa Gamma 
Phi (default). 
The best time so far has been made 

by Alpha Gamma Rho, 8:168-4. 
The championship race will be run 

off some time this week between Phi 

Sigma Kappa and Alpha Gamma Rho. 

The date has not yet been determined 

but will probabry be this Friday. 
The standing of the respective groups 

is: 

GKOUI' I. 

Lost 

1 

3 
3 
B 

Lost 

1 
2 
2 
I 
5 

LOST 

White elastic knee band at Drill Hall 
Sal unlay, Jan. 20, by member of a visit- 
ing team. Finder please return to ath- 
letic office. 



Substitution— Thompson for Gustafson. 
On the following Monday the Fresh- 
men defeated Deerlield Academy here 
with a score of 32-23. Atkinson and 
But tedield scored for the losers while 
Temple starred for the Frosh. The 
summary: 



Temple, If 
Sniffen, rf 
Jones, c 
Horner, 
Gustafson, lb 



i in -ii m i n . 
H. 

4 

5 



1 

20 

1IKKKHKI.II. 



Buttertield, lb 
Cook, rb 
Atkinson, c 
Zrodwick, If 
Gould, rs 
Bascoin, c 



it. 

e 
i 

6 

1 
1 


14 



K. 

12 





12 



K. 



8 
1 



9 



P. 

20 

10 





2 

32 



P. 



18 
3 
2 


23 



ten. 

Beal, If 
Sargent, rf 
Hunter, c 
Grayson, c 
Wirtb, rg 
Alexander, Ig 



1920. 
Sniffen, If 
Smiley, rf 
Sawyer, c 
Langsbaw, lg 
Thompson, rg 



ii. 


1 
(t 






It. 

« 

2 

1 



9 



K. 


2 







K. 

1 

1 

3 





P. 


4 









p. 

13 
5 
5 



23 



Final score, 1920—23. 
1923— 4. 

Referee— Bike. Time— 20-miuule 

halves. 

1924 vs. 2-Year. 

1924. 
Bartlett, F. S 



It 



RELAY TEAM RUNNING AT 

B. A. A. MEET AT BOSTON FEB.3 





Won 


Phi Sigma Kappa, 


4 


Delta l'hi Alpha, 


3 


Kappa Gamma Phi, 


1 


Kappa Kpsilon, 


1 


Q. T. V., 


1 


GaotTP 11. 






Won 


Alpha Gamma Rho, 


f) 


Theta Chi, 


4 


Lambda Chi Alpha, 


1 


Sigma Phi Kpsilon, 


3 


Kappa Sigma, 





Alpha Sigma Phi, 






Against Vermont and New Hamp- 
shire, Both with Veteran Teams. 

The chances of the relay team in the 
intercollegiate meet at the Boston 
Arena on Feb. 3 have been lessened 
materially by the number of men who 
have been incapacitated this past week, 
including Pierce, Isaac and Loring. 

The live men will not be picked 
until late this week, though MacCready 
and Gilford are sure of berths. Mac- 
Cready, the only veteran on the team, 
is in excellent form and should render 
a good account of himself. 

Our opponents will be New Hampshire 
State and Vermont, whose teams consist 
of four veterans and three veterans re- 
spectively. 



Kicker, rf 
Gifford, rf 
Hill, c 
Salmon, c 
Bartlett, P. G. 
Sellers, Ig 
Chase, lg 
Whitman, rg 



2-Year. 

Merchant, If 
Parsons, If 
Pierce, rf 
Howe, c 
Cutler, c 
Stover, lg 
Orthusl, rg 
Tufts, rg 



it. 

1 

2 



1 



2 









II. 


2 

1 
2 






K. 



1 











p. 

2 








2 



2 
5 

2 

4 




13 

i\ 
2 
4 

2 
4 




12 



Final score, 1924—23. 

2 Year— 12. 
Referee— Barrows. Time— 20-minute 
halves. 

The standard at preseut is as follows: 



1920 


4 


1925 


3 


1923 


1 


1924 


1 


2-Year 








2 
3 

4 



1.000 

1.000 

.333* 

.260 

.000 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studlo-MASONIC BLOCK— Northampton. 

Club Night Dances— popular with M. A. ('. Men. 
Private Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order - $35.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suits Pressed &0c Military Tailoring 



OVER ADAMS' DUUG STORK 



Fine Groceries 
Candies ano Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

io Main Street. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



Waffles 



Next Sunday Night 

YEC AGGIE INN 



Wesley Foundation 

am h erst; 

Student Life Work Bureau 

Personal interviews regarding service 
as teachers, professors, missionaries, 
rural service, pastors, agricultural in- 
structors, vocational education in home 
and foreign lands. 

F. A 



Collmgrn Ave. 



LEITCH 

DIRECTOR 



CbompsoiTs Onulp C a '^ 

Orafonola and Record Sale. Qood eeftBCS to 

buy a small-sized Columbia (irufoiiolu SI almost 
cost price. 10-in Records, 8 for $1.00. lt.ln. 
Records. 98c. Sale opens Monday. .Ian. mta. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 

PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABKLLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, I, lone 460-1!, P.O. Block 

~~K1ISIGSI- ELY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



PROF WARMING OF DENMARK 
TO SPEAK AT COLLEGE FEB. 20 

The Department of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics counts itself fortunate in secur- 
|B| Professor Warming, Professor 
of Statistics and Economics of the Uni- 
versity of Copenhagen, and Chief of the 
Statistical Department of that Cniver- 
sily, to deliver a led ure on I lie co-oper- 
ative and agricultural movements in 
Denmark. Professor Warming Is *■ 
expert on co-operative and agricultural 
movements and has heen chairman of 
several important committees of inves- 
tigation, of these societies. 

Professor Warming will lecture in the 
auditorium on Feb. 20, at 4 o'clock in the 
afternoon. This lecture will give ■ 
splendid opportunity for all who are in- 
terested iu the co-operative movement 
in Denmark to get some lirsthand infor- 
mation on the methods hy which this 
little country has attained a front rank 
in agricultural production and rural 
prosperity during the last 40 years. Pro- 
fessor Warming has an easy command 
of English and is said to he an excellent 
lecturer. 




INFORMAL COMMITTEE RUNS 

MEMORIAL HALL DANCE 

Because of the postponement of the 
Informal from Jan. 27 till the following 
Saturday, the Inlotinal Committee de 
cided lo run a Friday night dance .Jan. 
2tf in Memorial Hall. The dance was a 
very successful one in c\cr> way. 
About 40 couples attended. Wood- 
worth's orchestra, consisting ol Adams, 
saxophone; Woodworih, banjo; Dun- 
har, drums; and Parker, piano, fur- 
nished excellent music. Miss Kdna I,. 
Skinner of the Home Kconomics He 
partment. acted as i hapeione. 



FLORICULTURE STUDENTS 
ENTERTAINED BY SALESMAN 

On Tuesday afternoon, Jan. It, Mr. 
K. C. Fontaine, salesman for the Lord 
aixl Uuriiham < ircenhouse Const met ion 
Company, addressed the students in 
floriculture at French Hall. Mr. Fon- 
taine brought with him a ■•! of slides 
with which he illustrated his talk. 
These slides showed sectional views of 

the different members and parti ol ths 
greeahottee, and also pictures of the 

various types of greenhouses which the 
company putsout. The talk was heard 
hy nearly a hundred students. 

Mr. Fontaine was entertained later hj 
members of the Department and of the 
Floriculture Cluh.al an inlormal dinner 
at Draper Hall. H« the« returned to 
Flench Hall and talked informally to a 
lirgc numliers of the club on "Present- 
day i Ipporiunil ies la th* Floritt Indus- 
try." By means Of QMStlOBS of the 
audience wh.ch he answered, he 

brought out many g I points and RftTS 

some valuable ■aggcatloOl tor those go- 
ing into the l.usiness. Mr. Fontaine, l.y 

the natute of his work, keeps is oloas 

touch with the conditions ot the (lower 

growers throughout this section of lbs 

country, and his talks w ere all woi I h 
while to all who heal. I ihem. 




THRILLED? 

YOU bet he is! He's making a tre- 
mendous hit! She has just told 
him that he has hair like Rudy 
Valentino's. But he doesn't know 
whether to pretend that it came that 
way or confess that he did it with his 
little bottle of "Vaseline" Hair Tonic. 

He owes a lot of his manly beauty to 
that bottle. "Vas. line" Hair Tonic 
promotes the growth of the hair and 
keepa the scalp 'n the healthiest con- 
dition. At all drug stor. a and student 
barber shops. 

CHESEBROl'GH MFG. CO. 

(Consolidated) 

Slate Street New York 

Vaseline 

RFC U > PAT Off 

HAIR TONIC 

livery ' ' Vaseline ' ' Product isrecom men Jed every 
where because of its absolute furitiand effectiveness. 



CHEMISTRY DEPT. HEARS 
PROF. R. H. BOGUE TUESDAY 




Lecture on Gelatin and Glue to Fac- 
ulty and Students. 

The Chemistry Depart menl and the 
Juniors and Seniors majoring in Miem- 
istry and Microbiology heard Prof. U. 
H. Hogueof Lafayette College lecture 
Tuesday afternoon on ''Gelatin and 

Glue." 

The industrial manufacture was con- 
sidered mostly, with the speakers , 
tic*] experience making the talk v. iv 
interesting. 

Professor Bogue was at MA. C. Is 
1912-15 as an instructor. He ins writ- 
ten a book on "Clue and Celatin (hern- 
iary-- which the department has in iis 
lihrary. At present he is profeesol ol 
Physical Chemistry at Lafaystts Col- 
lege, laetos, Pes*. 



GIRL SCOUTING COURSE 

COMPLETED BY TWELVE 

The last meeting of the Girl Scout 
(raining class was held at thcAhl.cy. 
Jan. 80, at t lit- usual time. Miss Troll 
spoke on "("ampin", and Hiking". The 

nseetlag was not exclusively tot mem- 

ben of I he class, hill for all who ale 
Interested ll camping and hiking. 
Ahoiil 12 ".ills have completed Ihe 
course. All have passed their '•render- 
fool Test" and have .lone work on their 
Second Class. While I hey have not 
gone far inle Scouting, still they have 
heen aide to secure a general idea of 
il and ait: lairly well titled to take 
charge ol a troop if the occasion STiSSS. 
Mis. liiitterlield entertained last 
Wednesday len of the iiieliil.ers of the 
V. \V. C. A. COOIBBllteS for which she is 
the advisor, and several others who 
desired lo meal Mrs. J. K. Williams, 
the wife of Dr. J. K. Williams who 
■poke at assembly last week. Mrs. 
Williams ge*« an informal talk on 
Chinese life ami cur! s. 



The more you look 'round the 
more you'll appreciate how eco- 
nomical our clothes really are. 

Quality that matches the most 
ex pensive custom-made. 

Prices moderate. 

Ko<;krs Pkkt Company 

Broadway Herald S«|usre 

at Pith St. "Four at Bfth St 

( 'onvenienl 
Broadway Corners" Fifth Ays. 

at Warren al 4Ut St. 

NKW YOKK CITY 



: 



OMISSION 

Coder the Pst of men receiving 
Academic Activities Medals, published 
iu last week's ( oi.l.l oi \ \ . the name of 
John M. Whillier "2:1, was emitted. B* 
received a gold medal fol service on the 
Col. i i 01 w, the fhdea, and the Musical 
Clubs. 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good tilings to est. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel.416-W) liadlejr. Mass 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

Tome In;. ml ti\ join keys between U-00 A. M., 

Dee. -nil, anil s :;u e. m Dee. USh. 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Thm Rmumll Store 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 

CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Open under new management. 

I'. I). HOM.W'S, 

Prop. 
Tel. 489-W 



SaltedlAlmonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Hitohen 



Don't Forget ,our Sunday Night Suppers. 



r 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Ihvin.i W. Si.ai.k. "2S Kdltor-tn-Thlef 

l.i thru H. ARKiNcnoN '28 Managing Editor 

Dki'aktmkvi Hkaos: 

Kditorial. h:\iN<. W Si.ai.k *» 

Athletic, Ai.HBitr K. Waihii'24 

Lewis M. Kkitii '25 
Aeadetni.H, I.' nun ". A itnrNi; on '28 

Qaoaon I.. Cm urn '26 
Ciiiuii ii s, .i<>" n <;. Rasas -i 

f II A It I. KB K. Dl.UKII, .III. '25 

Kmii.v <;. Smith Vf 
Faculty. Ruth M. Wool. "-'4 

Alumni. L KKANClt Kicnnki.v'M 

Two Yeai . John M. Whittirk "28 

Bxchaass SOS" 
('iiiiiiiiiiiilcattonH. fUCX Cohen "23 



BlIBINERM DEPARTMENT. 
Owen E. Folsom '28 Business Manager 

Robfrt K. Htkkiik '24 Advertising Manager 
Ci.iKKoRi. I.. Itn.itEN "24 Circulation Manager 

kc.nai.i. w. LnruV davii. tfoxoai "-•.. 

(Ill.HKHT .1. IIM HMI.EK '-T. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
•opies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 1J08, Act 
•f October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



rather to give the rural communities a 
fair elianee at education, to give the 
necessary leadership which is impor- 
tant to each class of society, and to 
serve each community In the liest way 
possible. Such a purpose is being ful- 
iilled as a rapid survey of the Held will 
hliow. Through its various channels 
the college is promoting agriculture to 
the interest of the stale and proving of 
inestimable worth to the counties, 
towns and individuals who have sought 
aid ami has opened the eyes of those 
who are backward. The institution 
hi not a failure in its real mission. 
The time is not inopportune for a 
thorough survey of the college," 
says the writer of the letter. True, 
hut a nominal acquaintance with 
enrreni events will reveal the fact 
that the college is being carefully 
surveyed by the committee investigat- 
ing all state institutions and is con- 
trolled financially through the state 
board of education. Furthermore the 
cost to the slate has not amounted to 
•user a million dollars yearly," as in- 
dicated. Last year after returns on 
farm products had been subtracted 
from the total cost, the state paid 
approximately *700,<HK> and this year 
was one of the highest. However, 
there is need for a larger expenditure 
to further the work. 

Criticism is good if based on facts and 
an int'-male knowledge of the subject 
in hand, but when slung at will is un- 
just, unfair and malicious. 



H. M. HOWARD 91 OF NEWTON 
SPEAKS TO TEN-WEEKS' MEN 

The second of a series of lecluies to 
the winter school vegetable gardening 
students was held in French Hall at 
10-00 o'clock Jan. 23. At this time 
Henry M. Howard, who graduated from 
Agtiie in 1801, and has since operated a 
very successful market garden business 
West Newton, spoke on' the subject, 
"Marketing as the (irower Sees U", 
Mr. Howard feels that success in mar- 
ket gardening depends one-half upon 
production and one-half upon maiket- 
ing, and in his talk he developed the 
principle which tends to create success 
in marketing- 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wedn'day 

— A NO— 

Thursday 



DR. WILLIAMS AT ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page X 



A Random Attack. 
A recent attack on the college in a 
Boston llertihl open letter Ib worthy of 
notice because it states some uross un- 
truths, and represents an opinion which 
is perhaps of the greatest harm in 
npreading a mistaken idea to those 
citizens in the state who know very 
Utile about the slate college. The 
writer calls attention to the matter by 
tlatly declaring that "the experiment 
at Amherst" has failed. Was the col- 
lege ever an experiment F If it was, 
then all colleges are experiments, and 
all education is an experiment on (be 
young people. 

The reason for starting the college 
according to this man was to promote 
the idea "that a state once agricultural 
Hhotild at least maintain some of its 
old-time prestige, not only in the de- 
velopment of the land but in the 
e«|iiallv important matter of conserving 
the rural communities." "It has ful- 
filled none of these phases, the whole 
idea has failed, therefore, a state uni- 
versity will fail also." Even if the pur- 
pose of the college as stated has not 
been successful, what on earth does 
that have to do with a state university 
which is concerned with teaching en- 
Uineerinn. the arts, business and kin- 
dred subjects? Presumably the in- 
dustries would benefit by increased 
knowledge of business and engineering, 
and Massachusetts is an industrial 
slate. The original purpose id the col- 
lege as written in the Morrill Act of 
1862 was. "Without excluding any 
studies recognized as forming part of a 
liberal education, they are directed to 
teacli such branches of learning as are 
related to agriculture and ihe mechanic 
ails wilh Hi'' <lf-l<tretl objecto/ pretifj* 
in<i for tJtOM claWW « HOSTOt OlftdpfC' 
Unit piliunlinn in Ihe various pursuit* 
awl pre/eseiolM in life" The mechanic 
arts are taught in other institutions in 
accordance with legislative direction. 
Compare the true statement of purpose 
with that of the critic. It was not to 
maintain "old-time prestige," but 



that during the Renaissance Europe 
went back to the ancient classics in 
order to improve the minds of the 
people, while China must necessarily 
adopt a new order of things since her 
old civilization has now reached its 
high-water mark. Furthermore China 
is endeavoring ta accomplish in a few 
decades the transition that was ac- 
complished in Europe in centuries, 
namely, an industrial and political rev- 
olution. 

Mr. Williams also said that aid 
through money was not so good for the 
common people as aid through educa- 
tion. Especially is this true in agri- 
culture for most Chinese are farmers. 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Friday 



Mat 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Two Days. Thursday Prices 

"BLOOD AND SAND" 
from Vincents Inane/.' novel. 
antbor of "The Four 'torse- 
■ im-ii .' ' featuring Rudolph 
Valentino, Lila toe and Nits 
Naldi. 
Fos News Comedy 

Thos. Meirfhan. Theodore 

Roberts and Pauline Starke 

in "IF YOU BELIEVE IT. 

IT'S SO." A powerful story 

! of underworld life and a 

I crook's battle for happiness. 

Sport Review 

Larry Semon in 

"The Head Waiter" 



_ . A .las. Oliver Curwood story! 

Saturday "the valley of silent 
ddiuiudy MEN „ wlth AIma RuDen , 

and Lew Cody. A real red- 
— blooded romance, filmed In 

the frozen North 

News 
Al St. John In 

"The City Chap" 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Shirley Mason and Wallace 

NacDonald In "YOUTH 

MUST HAVE LOVE" 

A drama replete with in.vs 
tery. yet bubbling with the 
s ns i k le of >.. ut hand romance. 
Lupino Lnne in "Pirates" 
•i r'l Comedy. Pathe Review 



"Uudemocracy." 
In past years this college was noted 
more for the friendliness and coinrad- 
ship of the students than for any other 
part of our college life. A stranger on 
our campus could not help being en- 
hanced by Ihe fine spirit of fellowship 
and the congenial "hie" which greeted 
him at every turn. This year, bow- 
over, the custom is attached to the 
campus only by memory. A broad 
smile and hearty handshake seems to 
be a breach of etiquette among most of 
our student body. Especially is this 
coolness noticeable in the Freshman 
class. Praised by the scholastic board, 
lauded by Prexy.can it bo possible 
that they consider themselves above 
the vulgar mob? Do tbey believe 
themselves superior to the great mass 
of students here? Or is it merely their 
unfamiliarity with campus life that 
holds them thus aloof? If this latter 
condition be the true reason it is the 
duty of every real Aggie man to revive 
the ebbing spirit of amity and set a 
standard of fraternal brotherhood, 
which, by its very intensity, the Fresh- 
men cannot help but absorb. a.v.b. 



"PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Prominent Anionic the 
Famous Makes We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

is a good value for women who want the best 

there is In a seamless storking that yet 

will fit the ankles trimly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



NORFOLK SUITS 

Grays, browns and mixtures, in weight suitable for year 'round 
wear. Special reductions to clear our stocks for Inventory, Feb. ist 

These are worth looking over. 

Priced from $26.00 up 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



In view of the fact that a recent edi- 
torial would lead one to suspect that 
the student body has no voice in the 
management of Memorial Hall, it is 
necessary to explain that W. H. Marsh- 
man and O. E. Folsom are Ihe repre- 
sentatives of the students. Complaints 
may be given a hearing through these 
two men and many wrongs rectified. 



DEALERS IN- 



DRV AND FANCY GOODS 



LANDSCAPE CLUB 

W. B. Hatch of North Amherst, and 
a graduate of 15)05, will address the 
Landscape Club on golf course con- 
struction on Monday, Feb. 7, at 7-30 
p.m.. in French Hall, room F. Mr. 
Hatch is a national figure in golf course 
construction, operating in the United 
States and Cuba. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 by wall. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 

With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
See them in our window 

I*»8Se'<s* Shoe Stor 



C&rptrvtcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maae. 




Haberdashery Made by Welch-Margetson Ltd., London, 

Proof of the Quality. 

Sold by "The Ho«N of Walsh," 

Proof of the Value. 




The Profit in Quality 

Creameryinen, ('heeseinakeis and 
Dairymen operate their plants for one 
purpose only -to make and accumulate 
profits. 

They realize too, thai only by pro- 
ducing the highest quality milk foods 
at the lowest possible production cos!, 
can their margin of profit be increased. 

Nothinu is proving more successful in 
the effort to attain these results than 
the rapidly increasing use of 



WvaMetle 



This pure, inorganic, ureaseless clean- 
er is so pure and purifying, ami cleans 
clean with so little effort, thai its effi- 
ciency has loUf been established in Ihe 
Dairy industy. Its use insures tgalusl 
uncleanliness, bad odors and (it her 
causes of deterioration ami loss of qual- 
ity in milk products. 

Moreover, its absolute uniform qual- 
ity, dependable work, free riming prop- 
erties and harmless nature, all con- 
tribute toan unusually loweleamti", cost . 

Indian in 
circle 



Ask your supply man. 



in every 
package 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



INSTRUCTION IN ENGLISH 

BEING GIVEN BY STUDENTS 

At the nrgenl reqUMl of some of the 
residents ol the neiuhhoi fag lOWU of 
Hadley, the Christian Association, un- 
der the direction ol Mr. Banna and in 
Do-operation with I be Chris* Ian* Assoela- 

tion of AniberBl college, has under- 
taken a new branch of outside work. 

This work eOBSistS in teaching: the Eng- 
lish language to the Polish people of 
lladiey. The faculty of Instruction, 

who ate devoting three nights I week 
to this work al the BuSSCll School in 
1 1 a< I ley .are. from the Senior Class, (i. II. 

Irish. K. II. Sargent, M. Blebaroaoa, 
and I.. V. Broderick; and from Amherst 
College Thornton Lorimer. and Philip 
Goertx. 




MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

•ELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Trices. 
Inform*!* * Specialty 

\'i Ho. Prospect St.. Amherst. Mass 

Tel. 8BB-M 



1 



After Every Meal 



WRIGHTS 



Top off each meal 
with a hit of 
sweet In the form 
of WRIGLEY'S. 

It satisfies the 
sweet tooth and 
aids digestion. 

Pleasure and 
benefit combined. 




THE 

CHILDREN 



AG. EC. 26 
In connection with Agricultural Indus- 
try, Air. Be. 2»>. the depart incut has 

from time to time exhibited certain 

Slaw connected with Ihe production and 

distribution oi agricultural products. 
This year films have been secured from 
the United 8tates department ol Agri- 
culture and will be shown in Mock- 
bridge Ball at B v. m.'U the following 

dates: 

Feb. 2 — I'ncle Sain, World laimei. 

When s.ick Bundling and 
Marketing 

March J Wool and I. ami) Marketing. 

CottOB Ginning and Mark- 
eting, 
.students and the public generally are 
invited to view these pictures. 



NOTICES 

All liberal Christian studenisare in- 
vited to attend a supper give:: l>\ Unity 
Church, Feb. 4. in the church vestry. 
Buppai will be served at ♦» o'clock. Al 
7-:Kl a talk on "Coal Tar Products" will 
be given. 

On Tuesday evening, Feb. ti.al 7 p.m . 

Mr. Banna's class will meat In French 

Ball for a discussion of the dogma " My 
country right or wrong." All are in- 
vited to come prepared tot a lively dis- 
cussion. 



CORRECTION 

In the account of the Mid-Winter 
Alumni Day activities, published in 
last week's Coi.I.m.i an, several mis 
lakes were made which admit of cor- 
rection. 

1. The academic! Breakfast was hold 

on Saturday, Jan. 10, instead of OH Sun- 
day, as reported. 

2. The Alumni Dinner on Baturda] 
was addressed, not by Professor 

Micbels, but by President Butteriald 

ami Dr. I'd. 



The M. I.T. Musical Clubs have just 

returned from the most ■ucceaaful trip 

they have ever made. Concerts were 
! given in Atlantic City, Philadelphia, 

Schenectady. Bulla 

Bolyoke, and threi 

were given by radio. 



Plttsheld, and 

it the concerts 



Arrangements have been made for a 
track meet to be held in England next 
summer between Ihe combined Harvard- 
Yale and Oxford-Cambridge teams. 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 



w>(i.. Than, end 

Kit.. 
.Ian. St, 1,1.. 1 I 



CHARLES RAY in "A TAILOR HADE HAN " 
Sherlock Holmes in "A Cue of Identity" 



Saturday Evening. February 3 
■^ LJ H l^R/\l^E_r^, Original' Character Sketch*. 



Final Week of Our 

ANNIVERSARY SALE 

and "Final" also meant, that the day* are now limited and your opportunity waning 
ti. avail j (.11 in. 'If of tWl leinarkal.l.' ni.nii'S a%\ lint. 

REDUCED SHOES 



II iit I. Illnrk Shorn. B3.M 
High Tan Shwi, 8.90 

Low Kin. U Osfonla. 7. JO 



Nridrton Bseae tammm, aio.on 

flelllSiae Oxford (Viking), I IdM 

Nrlllrtun Hoarded Tan Viking. 12.50 



tie! tlie st> le-t!i.' l.iilei t til Ihe 1 1. Il.l.'lll lal quality. .f ...II mIi.H'H llieji tret of BUS* 
MM nndt res on Uh an inspiration and yon get ahead. 



CARL. H. BOsLTEIR 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

77/r House of Kufrpenheimcr Good ( *lothes 



Opportunities For 

SUMMER WORK 

Now available by 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY 



Lithographic Works 
Philadelphia, P». 



Topographical < Mflees 
Cheater, Vermont 

Fur particulars ess 



Western sales Ofacs 

Cleveland, Uhio 



SAMUEL CUTLER 26, 75 Pleasant St. 



62 Men in 100 

Picked this over-size 
25 tjear pen, 

from a tray of 
maaoried pen* 



T 



5 c ihe PATTER 



'TJANDSOMKR than 
** gold!" was the 
verdict. Large, trrnce- 
ful barrel In Chinese 
lacquer-red with 
smart black tips. Its 
native Iridium point 
isnssmooth as a jewel 
bt unrig — guaranteed 
25 years. Step in and 
give your hund thi 
pleasant sensation of 
the Duofold'e busi- 
ness-like feel. 




Lads) Duofold 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1913. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31, 1923. 



Old Deerfield fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfielo. Mass 



Faculty 



Alex's Lunch Room 

Formerly of the Candy Kitchen. 
OVER BOLLES* SHOE STORE 

SPECIAL NOON-DAY DINNERS AT »C— Food and Service of Highest 
Quality- -The Best Coffee in Town— l*"y * *5 -5° Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Hours, 7 a. M. to i-oo a. m. 
The place that made good over night-" Come up and bring your friends " 



The Best Business Career 

Is what every ambitious senior is 
thinking about at the present time. 
Life insurance is one of the best, one 
of the most desirable, and one of the 
most satisfactory as a permanent 
calling. 

In assets and volume of business, 
life insurance is one of the three lead- 
ing businesses of this country, yet the 
field is comparatively underdeveloped. 
Only 7 per cent of the economic value 
of human life in the United States is 
covered by insurance. This gives an 
idea of the big field still to be worked, 
especially business insurance for firms 
and corporations. 

As to remuneration: Reports of 
college graduates who have entered 
business indicate that life insurance is 
at the very top as a source of income. 
Now is the time for you to consider 
what you are going to do after gradu- 
ation. If you are ambitious and will- 
ing to work hard and are interested 
to know about life insurance, address 

Agency Department 




isurance Company 

or Boston. Massachusetts 
Largest Fiduciary Institution in New England 



FACULTY NOTES 

The Experiment Station Seminar for 
tins week was beld in Clark Uall on 
Monday afternoon. The department 
Of botany presented l he subject, "Re- 
search Service in Plant Pathology. " 
Dr. Anderson and Professor Osmuu out- 
lined 17 projects in plant diseases 
which are being carried out by the 
department. Each project deals with 
an important disease and methods of 
treating it under Massachusetts ton- 
ditioiiK. Among the projects is one on 
tobacco root-rot, onion smut, spraying 
and dusting experiments on the control 
of apple scab, ami comparison of spray- 
ing and dusting for potatoes. 

The next Seminar will be held Feh. 6 
in Kernald Hall on "Service of Ento- 
mological Research." 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoo Rmomlrlna Whllo U Wmlt 



$2.50 



In the near future an exchange pro 
lessorship is to he started between N. 
II State and Mass. Agricultural Col- 
leges. GsoffS K. 1'otter will give a 
series of lectures here the week of 
.March 19, primarily for the Horticult- 
ural staff, but also open to graduate 
students and faculty. Dr. J. K. Shaw 
willu<> 10 N'kw Hampshire in exchange. 
It is hoped that a valuable interchange 
of new itleas in horticultural science 
will result. 



NEW l'KICKS 
Men's Whole Soles. Rubber HeeU . 
Mens Half Solen, Kubber Heel* . 
Men's Kubber Soles. Rubber Heels 

Men's Half Soles 

WorkGuaranteed-AMHKRST HOU8K 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

('Hears and( Igarettes-Spei tii. price per carton 

on Cigarettes. 

Bcbrafft's Chocolates and other leadinu lines. 

Ormokmrm and Cannod Hoods 



S. S. HYDE 

Optiolan ««tt J»-wol»«" 

9 Pleatant Street (up one flight". 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks and other Reliable Makti 



Professor (iunness has completed a 
series of tests on low lift, high capacity 
pumps, such as are used by Cape Cod 
cranberry growers. These pumps are 
<>l peculiar type and are used almost 
nowhere else in the country. The 
ordinary low lift pump has too small a 
capacity for the needs of the cranberry 
bOf. 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pret iinit. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Buy your pressing ticket from B. (iamzue '28 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

necessary fixings. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Horn* Brom. Nockmrmmr 

order your next Suit or Overcoat here now. 
Best selections of Woolens in the latent pal 
terns always on hand. The high quality of our 
work Is apparent on fancy garments Try us 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdasher. 
11 Amity St. Next to Western Cnion Tel. OftVe 



font new station bulletins are now in 
press, but will nnt be ready redistri- 
bution for some weeks. Bulletin 22 by 
Dr. (iageon the 'Control of Hacillary 
White Diarrhoea" is a report of work 
done by the college under the Poultry 
Disease Klimination Law. Bulletin 212, 
•'Thirty Year Fertilizer Test," by S. B. 
Haskell reports two soil test that have 
been carried on by the station for a 
loo* period of years. Bulletin 213, 
•Tobacco Wildfire in 1922," by P, J. 
Anderson and (i. U. Chapman, gives 
the results of ohservations and experi- 
ments on the control of one of the seri- 
ous tobacco diseases in the valley. 
I Bulletin 214, "Combating Apple Scab," 
j by Webster S. Krotit, gives the methods 
iand experiment! carried out in the 
eastern part of the state. These new 
publications are indicative of the rapid 
advancement of scientific knowledge of 
aylieulliue. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 192S 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - - Mmi 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



— OK — 



Prof. F. P. Hand lectured on .Japanese 
poetry at The Jones Library Sunday af- 
ternoon. Musical selections were ren- 
dered during the program by Miss Eu- 
nice Austin and Miss Dorothy Turner. 



At the Methodist Episcopal church 
last Sunday evening Prof. Laurence 
Parker spoke on "The Challenge of Ag- 
ricultural Missions". 



It may be of some interest on campus 
to know that the t'ollege orchards, ex- 
clusive of the Experiment EM St BOS or- 
chards, produced in 1922 the followiug 
quantities of marketable fruit : apples 
8228 btt., Plums 95 hu., Pears 8H DO., 
(berries 2<.»71 <|ts., strawberries and 
Raspberries 2112 qts., Grapes 9284 lbs., 
This represents in every case a substan- 
t ial increase over the 1920 and 1921 crops. 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCOKI'ORATKD 

273-279 High St., fifolyoM 

Tml. 10B2-10B3 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



WATCH FOBS NOW IN 



Yours truly, 

NEW COLLEGE 

In the Memorial Building 



— TRY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply doue. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Short Courses 



TWO-YEAR QUINTET WINS 

ONE AND LOSES ANOTHER 

The Two-year bsskstbsll team de- 
feated Smith Academy of Hatfield OB 
Tuesday, Jan. St, l>y the MOM of -iii-l.'., 
in a loosely played game. 

The lineup : 

TWO-VKAK. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hoars: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thurs- 
day, Satuiday. 8-00 A. H. to 6.00 P. H. 
Friday, 8-00 A. H. to 9-00 P. H. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



IT'S A HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 





n. 


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Merchant. If 


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Associate Alumni, 

Memorial building, 

M. A. £ Athletic Association, 

Academic Activities, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association. 

Football Asmu iatioo, 
Track Association, 

The Collegian, 
Hockey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The A«;^ie Squib, 
Musical ( lulis, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telrphtuo. 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 



On Jan. 27 the Two-year team was 
swamped l»y Williiaham Academy , 
"iti-14. Cunninuhani of lb* visitors was 
the bright light of the name, scoring 
over half his team's points. 

The summary: 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 
1M-2 Amity St. 

Amherst Book Store 



STATIONER* 





\\ II.1IKA II AM 










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Just received a new 

Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal 
Paper, called "The Dyplomatic." 

See our window. 



C. F. DYER 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

At a Two-year Senior clan meeting 
held last week the following member* 
<>f the elsss were elected to the Two- 
year Commencement Committee: Kv- 
erett Woodward. Paul BwSBSon, Milton 
Allen, Burton Slick ney and Beatrice 
Kleyla. 



The Two-year Dramatic Club at a 
meeting held last Wednesday afler 
assembly elected the following perma- 
nent officers: 

President, Walter Cutler: ftee-preei- 
dent, Eunice Austin ; secretary. Beatrice 
Kleyla; assitant secretary. Phyllis 
Webster: treasurer, Ralph Kenniston: 
assistant treasurer. Albert Caron. 

JohD Benson was elected chairman 
of the Executive Committee. 



Richard Mellen, Msnsgei 175 J 
C. s. Hicks, General Mgr., 403 M 
Frank P. Kami, Manage! 136 R 
Roger l!. Friend, President 720 
Perry G. Bartiett, Managei 8325 
|olii) M. Whittier, Managei 170 
t harles \v. Steele, Manager 83*5 
[rving W. Slade, Editor 170 

Ernest T. Putnam, Manager 8330 
Philip B. Dowden, Manager K336 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 530 
Trescott T. Abele, Editor 861 \V 

Thomas L. Snow, Manager 



720 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, Owen K. FotSOm, Mi isgei 8314 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard I!. Smith, Manager 8314 

M. A.. C. Christian Association, Frederick B. Cook, President &33 

Public Speaking and Debating. Alexander Sandow, Manager 



Saving of 25% to 40°/ on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you art* in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our stoic ami ask us to show you whatever you may be 

interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 

25 to .10 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 

basis. l T . S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 

We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis thai you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2*35 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heeds, sewed, I .90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1.70 

Rubber heeds o! any kind, 50 c ts per pair. 

We will sew soles ifyour shoes are (ioodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

The Winchester Store 



I 

• i 






■ 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 31. 1923. 



BY THE CLOTHES HE WEARS 

A man is known by these as well as by the company he keeps -and the right company to bay from is 

SOUTH WICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



TWO YEAR ALUMNI HOLD 

FIRST BANQUET AT BOSTON 

The first annual banquet of the If. A. 
C. Two Year Alumni Associaituii was 
held last Saturday night, January 27, 
at Hit- Hotel Brunswick, Boston., ami in 

addition to the guests from the college, 
ahout sixty graduates of the two year 
class were present. 

The banquet was a lively affair, fof ■ 
line list of speakers bad heen selected 
and all those connected with the han- 
quet saw to it that their part of tB4l 
work was well done. 

l'rof. Willard K. French acted as 
toastmaster, and 1m.Ui President Hiilter- 
field and l'rof. 1'helan spoke, (ail 
I.ihhy, president Of the Association was 
unahle to he present, and so his place 
was taken hy Arthur Taylor of last 
year's class. John Armstrong Presi- 
dent of the '22 class, Paul Swanson. 
Pres. of the Student Council, Cordon F. 
Steele '21 and Lorenzo Fuller, M. A. < 
'21 also spoke and in addition to a nutn- 
her of College songs, the Colonial Or- 
chestra played several seleciions. Miss 
Hamlin spoke on the work which the 
girls of the two year class had l»een do- 
ing. During the evening the Board of 
Directors held a mooting and made 
plans for a reunion at Amherst in June. 
The Banquet Committee was composed 
of Gordon B. Steele ami Arthur H. Tay- 
lor, and the Reception Committee of j 
Hodman C. Nowers "21 Margaret A. 
Carroll '21, B. W. Wickwire '21, 
Donald M. White '22, and Bath Carpen- 
ter '21. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Connecticut Aggie 1'arcly defeated 
Harvard :i'.»-:t7 in a hotly contested 
game recently, (apt. Alexander of the 
Aggies was the individual star, with 21 
points to his credit. 



The Wesleyan Fresh men have I. ecu 
pcuali/ed for not living up to college 



customs, by having the date tor hurn- 
ino their Frosh caps moved forward 
from March gSod to April 14th. The 
penalties are: 

1. For not ringing the chapel bell in 
celebration ol the swimming teams' vic- 
tory over Stevens on Jan. Kith, ad- 
vancement of the date one week. 

8, For neglecting the custom of 



speaking to members of the faculty, 
upperclassiuen, and sophomores, ad- 
vancement of the date amounting to 
one college week. i. e., to April 14th. 



'22. — (i. T. Raker has completed his 
month of professional improvement 
work on the campus and has returned 
to school at West Springlield, where he 
is teaching agriculture. 



(^LA/VCLEYS FIRST 




MODEL IJV FLIGHT F+> 



-3> 



u 



The way of an Eagle in the air" 




ALUMNI 

A committee of alumni has been ftp 
pointed to investigate and make a spec- 
ial report on athletics. The inemhers 
of the committee are as follows: 
Raymond K. Clapp '12, Chairman 
Benjamin W. Ellis, TS 
(ieorge B. Palmer, 'lfj 
Richard W. Smith, 17 
C. Raymond Vinten, '22. 
The Alumni Directory is being pre- 
pared for the press. It is expected to 
be ready by the last of this week. 

TO.- F. F. Damon who has been con- 
nected with the Field Department of 
the California Fruit (irowers Exchange 
for the past four years has resigned to 
accept the managership of the Orange 
Heights Fruit Association at Corona, 
California. 

"17.— C. K. Stearns has returned to his 
position at the Fsst-x County School 
where he is an instructor in Market 
(iardeuing. 



ENTURY after century 
men broke their necks 
trying to fly. They had 
not troubled to discover 
what Solomon called "the way of 
an eagle in the air." 

In 1 891 came Samuel Pierpont 
Langley, secretary of the Smith- 
sonian Institution. He wanted 
facts. His first step was to whirl 
flat surfaces in the air, to measure 
the air pressures required to sus- 
tain these surfaces in motion and 
to study the swirls and currents of 
the air itself. Finally, in 1896, he 
built a small steam-driven model 
which flew three-quarters of a 
mile. 

With a Congressional appro- 
priation of $50,000 Langley built 
a large man-carrying machine. Be- 
cause it was improperly launched, 
it dropped into the Potomac River. 
Years later, Glenn Curtiss flew it 
at Hammondsport, New York. 

Congress regarded Langley's 
attempt not as a scientific experi- 
ment but as a sad fiasco and 



refused to encourage him further. 
He died a disappointed man. 

Langley 's scientific study which 
ultimately gave us the airplane 
seemed unimportant in 1896. 
Whole newspaper pages were given 
up to the sixteen-to-one ratio of 
silver to gold. 

" Sixteen-to-one" is dead polit- 
ically. Thousands of airplanes 
cleave the air— airplanes built 
with the knowledge that Langley 
acquired. 

In this work the Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company 
played their part. They aided in 
developing the "supercharger," 
whereby an engine m;\y be sup- 
plied with the air that i needs for 
combustion at altitude:' of four 
miles and more. Getting he facts 
first, the Langley method, made 
the achievement possible. ' 

What is expedient or imp*, rtant 
today may be forgotten tomo.row. 
The spirit of scientific research 
and its achievements endure. 



Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



General^Elecflric 

Qcncral Office C01Tlp<iny Schcnectad^NX 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



l^tfD 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE! 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 7, 1923. 



No. 15 



BRILLIANT RUSSIAN FOUR 
PRESENT PROGRAM OF SONG 



POOR CONDITION TELLS AS 
AGGIE LOSES AT HANOVER 



Best of Season's Entertainers Delight 

Their Hearers With Sacred, Folk 

and Classic Songs. 

The Russian Cathedral Quartet under 
the auspices of the Social Union gave a 
very pleasing concert in Rowker Audi- 
torium laBi Sunday afternoon. The 
first numbers on the program were 
given by the quartet in the quaint 
Cathedral Hobes of ibelr native land. 
They then appeared in evening dress 
for two numbers and the remainder of 
the program was given in the native 
peasant holiday costumes. The songs 
included both Hussian and English 
pieces. The Volga Boat mini Song, a 
Hussian folk song, was the most pleas- 
ing of the Russian numbers. Nicholas 
Vasilief. tenor, won the repeated ap- 
plause of the audience, lie sang "The 
Song of India" aud "Just a-Wearyiug 
for You" as encores. 

Harry Wilhelm, the accompanist, 
rendered some very flue pieces and 
gave some original selections for en- 
cores. He also explained each of the 
Russians songs given by the Quartet. 

The program : 

1. Lord'* Prajer. Customary Chant 

ft, The Cherubic Hymn. Frotouoix.lT 

In Old Cathedral Kobe* 
8. Dawn (Russian College Alma Mater). 

I v.'tnoff 
4. KoMi-y (In KnitliBhi. Nevin 

Quartette 
6. Scherzo In K minor. Mendelssohn 

6. Kuisian Mush' Box, l.iadofl 

Harry E. Wilhelm. I'iano 

7. Aria from Opera Kliroletto. Verdi 

N. <i. Wastlevskjr. Tenor 
I. The Two Grenadiers. Schumann 

A. H. CrluoriefT. Maritime 
■■< Kentucky Home (In Kniflish) 
Quartette 

INTERMISSION 

10. Volga Boatman Song (Russian Folk Song) 

11. In the Wood (Russian Folk Sonic 
Quartette, appearing in Peasant Costume 

12. Big Bass Viol, Binkannon 

M . P. Bataeff. Basso 

13. Aria from Opera Elisir de Amoure. 

Donizetti 
N.8. VaslliefT, Tenor 

14. I»uet— Mother Machree (In Knglish) 
Nicholas Wasilevsky and Michael BataefT 

15. Sixth Hungarian Rhapsody. I.is/.t 
IK. Second Gavotte. SapelnikofT 

Harry Wilhelm, Piano 

17. Invocation to the Sun (Russian Folk Song) 

Quartette 



PROF. PATTERSON PLEASES 

AUDIENCE WITH HENRY IV 

On Wednesday evening, Jan. 31, at 
ft-30 in the Memorial Huilding l'rof. 
Patterson interpreted the first part of 
Shakespeare's Henry IV excellently 
A large enthusiastic audience was 
present, especially appreciating his 
excellent representations of Falstaff. 

The reading of Hamlet which was 
scheduled this week will of necessity 
be postponed for a few days. The an- 
nouncement will be made later. 



Dartmouth Sextet Proves too Strong 

for Capt. Gardon's Men. Alger's 

Work Prevents Larger Score. 



The Mass. Aggie Hockey team jour- 
neyed to Hanover last Saturday after- 
noon and went down to defeat at the 
hands of the Dartmouth Team 5-1. It 
was the ninth straight game for the 
victors, and after they got into the game 
were never in danger. The Aggies went 
into the bum with little practice, ow- 
ing to the bad weather the pievious 
days. 

A It hough the visitors were outclassed 
by the Creen men it was due to Algei 'J 
work at goal that the sense was kepi 
down. Only once, during ihe tiist few 
minutes of the game, did the Farmers 
shine, for a goal was made after 
some fast passing and a pretty shot 
by "Doe'* Gordon, but from then on 
ihe Aggie team lacked aggressiveness 
and proved unahle to stop the onslaught 
of their opponents. Soon after the 
Aggie goal. Foster evened the score hy 
shooting a goal for Dartmouth, seeming 
to [put new life into his teammates. 
Neither learn scored for the rest of the 
period. 

In t he second period Dartmoul h work- 
ed the puck many limes into shooting 
position, hut Alger and his stick were 
always in the way, and turned aside 
many a prospective score. In this per- 
iod the Aggie men showed signs of the 
hard skating on soft ice, and the large 
rink Berved to tire them early in the 
period. Dartmouth scored three times 
in this third, and two of the scores were 
forced into the cage after hot scrimm- 
ages in front of the goal. The home 
team seemed stronger than ever and 
took advantage of their weakened op- 
ponents. 

The last period marked a comehack 
hy the visitors and Dartmouth was held 
to one goal, which was another .esult 
of a scrimmage in front of the Aggie 
goal. This fifth and last Dartmouth 
score marked the end of the caging, and 
from then till the end of the game both 
teams played good hockey. Foster for 
Dartmouth and Captain Gordon lor the 
Aggies proved the individual stars. 
Both exhibited a high brand of Hockey 
and were the men closely watched by 
their respective opponents. 

Next Saturday the team goes to West 
Point to play tne Army.' A hot contest 
is assured 

The sunimarv : 

I.AKTMOITH »*•■• *■«•«■ 

Oeborne, Furey. lw lw. Gordon 

Lyon, Fletcher, rw rw, Lamb, Nicoll 

Sbeeby, Sly, c 

c, Whitaker. Hilyard 
Foster, Id ld,Hodsdon 

Perry rd rd, Goldsmith 

Neidlinger. Leonard, g gi Alger 

Goals— Foster 2. Osborne, Lyon, 
Sheehy. Gordon. Time— Three 15-min- 
' ute periods. 



PRES. MARY E. W00LLEY OF 
NIT. H0LY0KE SPEAKS HERE 



Discusses National Problems in "Edu- 
cation as an Adventure." Pleads 
for Serious-minded Citizens. 

Last Wednesday afternoon at assein 
bly Miss Maty F. Woolley, president of 
Mount llolyoke College, spoke on an en 
lirely new phase of the much discussed 
subjecl ol education. 

Her statement that "education is an 
ad vent ure" was given considerable de 
velopinent lo make it comprehensible. 
She said lhal education as an avenue of 
culture is admitted, but education as an 
adventure, although it appeals to I he 
imagination, is more ditlicmt to under- 
stand. As an example to amplily her 
contention, she used the educational 
slat us ol China. 

The Chinese educational system is one 
ul (he oldest on eallh, howevei, since 
the advent of missions and government 
representatives it has become considera- 
bly altered. Foiineily I he Chinese [stu- 
dent was an esleemed being, reverenced 
by his illiterate country men. Today a 
model educational system has been es- 
tablished hy foreign government, mis 
sionaries, ami private agencies. Inker 
sities are now scattered throughout I In- 
land, offering knowledge and training 
to both men and women. 

In speaking of the problems facing 
i be I'niled Male.*, Miss Woolley said 
she never fully realized Ihe condition of 
Continued on pig* 4 



CADET DEUEL CONVICTED BY 
R. 0. T. C. COURT MARTIAL 



Hock Trial Staged by Juniors in the 
R. O. T. C. Last Week. 

A mock General Court Maitial with 
the members of the Junior class 
who are taking Military as participants, 
last week convicted Charles F. Deuel, 2d 
of galloping his horse in violation ol 
orders. 

This off com would ordinarily be pun- 
ished by disciplinary judgment of the 
commanding ollicer, but the case was 
used to show the rest of the It. (). T. C. 
how a court was conducted. 

As t lie court did not know whether 
Deuel was guilty or not, the efforts of 
the prosecution and defense to prove 
t heir points were carefully considered. 

Walter Dimock and Hose we 1 1 King 
were Trial Judge Advocate and Assist- 
ant Judge Advocate respectively and 
they conducted the prosecution. Victor 
Cabalas* was defense counsel with 
James Williams as his assistant. The 
remainder of the class constituted the 
court, with Charles Steele as law mem- 
ber. This exhibition gave the rest of 
the students a chance to see how court- 
martials are conducted, and also gave 
the Juniors a chance to use the knowl- 
edge they bad acquired in the past two 
weeks. 



HARVARD RALLIES IN LAST £ 
MINUTES AND WINS 23-2f £ 



Game Marked by Fast Playing ar^ 

Strong Aggie Defence. Bike 

and Barrows Star. 

The Mass. Aggio hasketeers lost 
another close game lasl Wednesday, 
Sfi-SQ when they met the strong Harvard 
aggiegalion on Ihe Cambridge BOOT. 
The game was nip and tuck aud Ihe 
result <|iiesl ionable until Ihe lasl few 
seconds. One ol I be members of Ihe 
Harvard squad made the statement. 
"For the lirsl ten minutes I didn't even 
know which basket I was shoot ing for, 
those Aggies were so last'" In fad, 
at half lime, Ihe visitors were leading 
by a three-point margin ami it was only 
in the last (wo minutes that Harvard's 
sons pulled ahead with the winning 
points. The Aggie delence was an 
light, so that the home team made hut 
one basket in the lirsl hall. 

Hike, although playing guard scored 
as many baskets as any one of the 
Maroon tosseis. while Itariows was Ho- 
ot her high scorer from Ihe Moor. A 
rally hy Miller, Meiriam ami Samborski 
in the closing minute* gave Harvard 
t be game. 

Summary : 



Gordon, If 

Meiriam, If 
Lowenihal, rf 
Miller, c 
Sipp, c 
McLeish, lg 
Black, rg 

Sambotski, rg 



Hike, rg 
Hale, lg 
Marshman, c 
Ferranti, If 
A arrows, rf 



UAKVAIM*. 

II. 

1 
1 

4 
I 

1 
(1 
8 
1 



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6 
I 

211 

Time -2(1 min. halves. Keferee— Mc- 
Cuiuess. Score at half time -M. A. C. 
ii, Harvard «. 







« 
(I 



VARSITY DEBATERS WILL 
MEET CONN. AND R. I. MARCH 15 



Triangular Match Tryouts to be Held 
Today. 

The Varsity Debating Team will meet 
the teams of Conneeticuc Aggie and 
Rhode Island State College in a trian- 
gular debate on March 15, 

The subject will be; "Resolved: that 
the United States shall recognize the 
Soviet government of Russia." 

Immediately after Assembly today the 
tryouts will he held, and it is expected 
that competition will be keen. 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7. 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7, 1923. 



Athletics 



LOOSLY PLAYED GAME WON 
FROM M. I. T. SATURDAY 9-14 



off Thursday afternoon ol this week. 
Tlu> summary : 



Much Fouling and Fumbling Makes 

Game Slow and Uninteresting. 

Ferranti Stare at Foul Line. 



1986. 
Kllhourni 

M<-< mil, 1<I 

II ilt.lii lis, I'd 

Taylor, <• 
Currier, lw 
Gordon, rw 

Word, rw 



The Maroon baaketball team same 
Into Us own again last Saturday when 
ii defeated M. LT.la the Drill Ball. The 
mime waa -low and characterised bj 
freqaeat fouling and fumbling. Kelther 

I, -am ■earned 10 have iib mind on the 

KHIiH'. 

Ferranti Booted Hist alter a law aec- 
oodaof play, dropping the ball through 
from the foul line. A foul by the Aggies 

a moment laicr which was made by 
Miller tied tbeeoorc and another put the 
visitors in the lead. Coleman sank the 

spheroid ami put tbeaeore at 4-1. I'm/. 

Ferranti added one point to the agfflc ■ 
total with a tree try ami Eddie Bike, 
with a pretty pivot and dril.ldc, tied the 
Men at 1 I leiranti made another 
tree shot wood and M. I. T. again drew 
into the lead when Davidson seored. 
Ferranti was going well and tied it again 

at « with afoul shot end a moment 

later Marshman, with a long pass Iron, 
Harrows, made a Boot hasket at long 

range. e"enraatl made another loal, 

followed by two more, and tin- halt en- 
ded with Ho- icon IMS in f*»Ol Oi the 

'• kggata." 
The aaeoad halt started with a 

foul shot by Ferranti and an instani 

later be made another, hut was then 

removed f ton the mime with a turned 
ankle. Miller made a doiihle count* r 
and followed with a foul. Marshman 

scored from tbeflooraod Harrows sank 

a loiil. The hall Hayed in V tie mi. Idle 
01 the Boor ior a lew minutes and then 

Harrows seon-d another from the foal- 

line. A moment later he dribbled down 

the floor fol a two-polutet, but Cook the 

visiting captain, offeel it with anothci 
Boot hasket. Cook then sank a fottl 
and a 11. ...1 hasket in .|tiick succession, 

bringing the Bnnl -con- t.. iu-h. 
Bnaaary : 



Qoali Moberg 1998, 



1996. 

g, Wheeler 

<i, Williams 

Id, White 

r.l, Clarke 

id, Cormier 

e. Wade 

lw. St opioid 

lw, Moberg 

rw, Anthony 

rw, Hotter 

Taylor 1995. 



Keleree Doc Cordon 1998. 

three 16-mlnute periods. 
The pres.nt standing: 

Won Loot 

L990 * ° 

I '..2:. m <> 

1994 1 - 

IVS3 t» : > 



Time — 



INDOOR 1NTERCLASS TRACK 
MEET TO BE HELD MARCH 10 

The Annual Indoor lnter-Clasn Track 
Met will he held March 10 this year. 
Varsity letter men and most of the 
member! of the winter track squad will 
nut be eligible to compete. Three 
places will count in each event; five 
points for first place, three for second, 
and one lor third. In the relay races 
tea points will be uiveti for first place, 
live lor second, and three for third. 
Numerals will he awarded to the first 
two men in each event. 
The events are : 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing*. 

Studio— MASONIC BI.OCK-Northauii'ton. 

Club Nijfht Dances— |K>I>ular with M. A. C. Men. 

Privet* Lessons by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



Percent 

1.000 

I 008 

Jtt 

.(Kit) 



IHNMMi KVENTH 

2(1 yd dash 
800 yd dash 
000 yd dash 
1(1(10 yd dash 
Mile run 
2 Mile run 



KIKI.U KVKNTB 

liiuh Jump 
Shot Put 
Itroad Jump 



SOPHOMORES DEFEAT FROSH 
AND SO ARE HEADING SERIES 

The Sophomores have once more 
taken the lead in the interclass l.asket- 

bnll series by defeating the Freshmen 

I,, the tune ol a 17 to 11 score on Feb. 
2. fish '2."> was the individual friar Of 

the game ami made several brilliant 
shots. Sawyer was the beel man on 

Hie Freshman team. The 2-Year team 
was scheduled to play the .Seniors, hut 
tailed to appear, and so forfeited the 
■;■ The lineup was as follow! I 

1818. 

Cablll. It 



UKI.AY HC1IKDII.K 

(Two Laps) 

Feb. 13— 2<l vs. 88. 

24 vs. 2:;. 

Fel). 18—88 vs. 24. 

2 yr. vs. 23. 
Felt. 20 -25 vs. 24. 

88 vs. 23. 
Feb. 87—88 vs. 2:.. 

24 vs. 2 yr. 
Mai. 1-25 vs. 24. 

98 vs. 2 yr. 

NUMKKAl. UKI.AY HACK 

Mar. 0-25 vs. 20. 



oliser, ii 
I loss, e 

Hurley, Ig 

Hale, rg 

Fish, rg 



11120. 

Amstlcn. F., If 
( ,1 ay son, al 
Jensen, rl 

Sawyer, e 

Thompson, rg 

Langahaw, in 



1:. 
1 

1 
1 

4 












(I 



r. 


11 









7 





VI. \. «'. 

Perranti, if 

Samuels, If 
Harrows, rf 
Marshman. <• 
Hale, lb 

Bike, rb 



if. i. 1. 
Hubbard, rg 
Job neon, Ig 

Coleman, c 
Davidson, rf 
Cook, rf 
Miller, If 
Sawyer, If 



it. 




1 

•J 

(I 
1 






1 
1 

2 

1 
(I 



r. 


•2 





U 




(i 

(i 
1 
:i 




ii 

4 
4 

ii 
2 

lit 



p. 
2 

2 
2 


11 

17 




(I 
11 




11 



APPRENTICE TEACHING 

The following is part of a letter wit- 
ten in to the Atr. Ed. Department by a 
sludent now earring as apprentice 
teacher: "The work here is very inter- 
est ing and is proving to be of more 
value to me than I would have ever 
tbongbl possible. It is a rare chance to 
gel some lirsi band experiences, and I 
am not letting any (jo by. The value 
of apprentice teaching is all and much 
more than you have told me." 



Final ■core— 1996, 17. 
1888, 11. 

Ueferee— Hall. Time— 20-minute pe- 
riods. 

The Handing at present is as follows: 

W..11 boat lVicent 

4 1.008 

4 1 .800 

2 2 500 

1 :\ .2511 

Q 5 .000 



'22. -George Thompson is now work- 
Ingfof the general Electric Company 
at Pittafield. 



1025 
1H20 

1998 

1024 
2 Year 



Referee— Eebjorneoo. 

time M. A. C. 11. M. I- 

minute periods. 



4 

Score at 
'1'. ii. Time 



11 

half 
—20 



1925-1926 NUMERAL HOCKEY 
GOES TO 1-1 TIE MONDAY 

The Freshmen and Sophomores foil! 
to a 1 to 1 lie in 
series, on 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wedn'day 

— AND— 

Thursday 



team ha 
was to 
deciding 



the interclass hockey 
Monday afternoon. Neither 

i„ en defeated, and the game 
ieve been the numeral game, 

the championship. The game 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO VICTORS 
IN 1NTERFRATERN1TY RELAY 

Alpha (iamnia Rho has won the in- 
let I ratetnily relay championship for 
this season hy defeating the team rep- 
uting l'hi Sigma Kappa on Friday, 
Feb. 2. ft was almost a neck-aml-neck 
race all the way, and was 1 he closest 

race held on the board track for aome 
time. Hart, running anchor man for 
Alpha Gamma ftbo, agaioat Shedd, of 

l'hi Sigma Kappa led by the thickness 

of hie body as the finish line waaoroased. 

The race was run in the best time of 
the season, 2:13 7-10. 

The lineup of thi learns was: 

Al I'llA O AM MA MM IMII SK.M.V KAIM'A 

Bates '88 Oarretaoa '24 

Bartletl "88 Branner '24 

Newell '23 Potter *88 



Was taal and hard fought, hut neither 

team was able to pui across the winning 

tally. No overtime period was played, 

but the -ame will probably he played 



Hart '98 



Shedd '20 



'81.— Carrol Hunker has accepted 

»it ion in Philadelphia. 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Friday 



Mat 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 

Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



- 



Mat. 3, K\ <>. 
6-45. 8-30 



Two Days. Thursday Frices 

The masterpiece of the mas- 
ter producer, Cecil H. I)e- 
Mtlle'l intensely modern pro- 
duction. ••^1anll»Ui"hter. ,, 8 
reels, from Alice Duer Mil- 
ler's wonderful novel, with 
Thomas Meighan, Leatrice 
Joy, Lois Wilson and a »<>n- 
dei ful cast, rivaling" Anatol" 
News Comedy 

Katherine MacDonald and 
Win. P. Carlton in "Domes- 
tic Relations." The best 
picture Miss MacDonald has 
appeared in for some time. 

Sport Review 
James Aubrey in 

"Tenderfoot Lack" 

Wheeler Oakman and Mary 
Anderson in "The Half 
Breed." Oliver Morocco's 
greet Htaite success. Thou- 
sandsof fear-maddened steers 
in wild stampede, a thrill. 
Pathe News 
.'reel Sunshine Comedy 

Claire Windsor, Richard 
Dixand Baby Pe«y in"Fools 
First." Another Marshall 
Neilun success. 

Screen Snapshots 
j reel Christie Comedy, 

" Let'r Go " 



No. 1 Pocket 
KODAK 

Series II 



T. S. PEKINS 

Suits made to order - 935.00 to $45.00 
Raincoat* 

Suits Pressed 50e Military Tailoring 



Picture size 
x 3 T /4 in- 




TO make a picture,pull 
down the camera bed 
— the lens instantly 
springs into position — 
look in finder, ami"click" 
the shutter. No focusing. 
Arulthisqiiick-action camera 
can be earned with a few rolls 
ofextra film in your coat pocket. 
I nstantancous speedsof 1/25, 
1/50 and i/iooof a second, 
bulb and time action, and coun- 
tersunk autographic attach- 
ment. 

Ask to see it at our Kodak 
counter. 

Price $13.50 

Other Jutngraphic Kodaks 
$6.50 up 

DEUEL'S 
Drug Store 



OVER ADAMS' DRUG STORE 



Dairy's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDED, CONSULT US 

W. B.~DRURY 

10 Main Street. 



Waffl 



Again on Sunday Night ! 

ye aggie: inn 



Wesley Foundation 

amherst; 
Student Life Work Bureau 

Personal interviews regarding service 
as teachers, professors, missionaries, 
rural service, pastors, agricultural in- 
structors, vocational education in borne 
aud foreign lands. 

F. A 



Collage Ave. 



LEITCH 

DiarcTon 



Cbompsoif $ Dmclp Calks 

This Is the final week of our Onfonota ami 
Record Hale. You will HVtrfM another ehSBCS 
to buy machines and records at the pines we 
are offering. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Amateur Developing and Printing 



Hills Studio Phone 456-R 

KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



IN 



en* 



brow? 

Not naturally— but it's getting 
higher. The first line of hair is 
in retreat. Bring up the "Vas- 
eline" Hair Tonic! 
And how do you think the collar 
advertisement men got that way 7 
"Vaseline" Hair Tonic, of course. 
It will lay your rebellious curls in 
the same sleek and shiny manner. 
"Vaseline" Hair Tonic will improve 
the condition of your hair as well 
as its appearance. 
At all drug stores and Btudent bar- 
ber shops. 

Vaseline 

»Eo.u.t.rAT.orr. 

HAIR TONIC 

Chesebrough Mfg.Co 

(consol idaled ) 



Academic Activities 

MUSICAL CLUBS IN BIGGEST 
HITS OF SEASON LAST WEEK 



Joint Concerts with Framingham and 

Worcester Normal Schools please 

Large Audiences. 

Two more coucerts lasi week wen 
added to the list of successes which the 
college musical clubs have aelreved in 
ibeir work Ibis seaaoa. At Framing. 
bain Normal School on Thursday even 
ing, Feb. 1, and nl Worcester Normal 
School on I he next evening, Kelt. |, 
the men put on the two best Cornells 
which they have yet given. Tbej were 
coinineu ded highly aftereach occasion 
hy members of the faculties of the re- 
spective schools on the quality of their 
entertainment. 

In both cases the occasion was a joint 
concert of the men's and the women's 
clubs, which added greatly to IBS inter- 
est of the programs. The Kraniingham 
Club, of about till members, and led hy 
one of their own number, sang twice 
during the evening, while Ihe rest ol 
the program was taken up hy I be 
visitors. At the close of the program 
both clubs joined in singing the Alma 
Maters of the two InaUtUlloa 

The M. A. ('. <ilee Huh also appeared 
twice during the evening. SOOllD| III 
biggest hits in the opening number, I ha 
Sextet from Lscta, and Old Blaet 
Joe. Baleetloaa by lbs orchestra, 11. i>. 

Fuller's clarinet solo, and W'caiher- 
wax's readings and pantomine made Dp 
the remainder of Ibfl progaoa, the latter 

bringing down Ihe house lime and 
again with conlinuoUh applause. The 
crowd of about .'»(MI was an enl husiast ie 
one, ami was certainlv responsihle for 
a great pari of the evening's sn.r 

Owing to a lata atari and poor train 
service, the coiiceri at Fraininghain 
was delayed in slatting by about a half 
hour. This shortened ihe period fol 
dancing, which was forbidden after 11. 

The dabs adjourned t<> a nearby -i" 

milory after the concert, and the infor- 
mal dance was rathei exclusive in na- 
ture, as school rules forbade all tboaa 
girls not taking l»»rt in the concert 
from dancing afterwards. Bowerer, 
the girls of the club proved themselves 
excellent entertainers in every respect, 
and much credit is due them for the 
thoroughness with which the whole 
eveninR's events were carried through. 
On the following night in the lame 

auditorium of the Worcester North llkh 

School, a similar program 1 

before an audience of ovei BU0. Here 

the Normal School oiee Clnb appeared 

six limes during the evening, ami their 
singing under the direction ol tbeli 

leader and accompani. -1 Mr. Muzzy was 



greatly enjoyed. M. a. O.'a eootrlbn« 

lion lot he program was Ihe same as on 

the night before and was equally saa 
eeeafnl. A public dance wae held alter 
ihis oonei 11 In t be High Bebool <-s ■ 

until IS and vvi- well aliended A v.i\ 

large Dumber of patronaand patroni 

Were secured for the concert by Ihe 
memheis of the Worcester Saciiltv, who 

had the affair in charge. 
Members ol the af. a. C. Club who 

did nol go home afler Ihe conceit slaved 
in or ahotit Worcesler lor ihe ntgbl and 

returned to Amheral on Saturday morn- 
ing. On tomorrow evening the cliilis 

will perform at the Northampton Hlgo 

School under Ihe allspices ol the Noilh- 

ampiou Teacber'a lasoclatloo, There 
will be a danee after the concert, 



ROISTER D0ISTER BANQUET 
HELD LAST TUESDAY, JAN. 30 



New Office Opened for Competition. 
Prom Show to Travel out of State. 

Mioill 10 members ol Ihe Rotate 1 
Doisiers including Ihe Members of Ihe 

Prom, show casi enjoyed a banquet and 
i get-together in Draper Hall laet Tuea 
day evening, Jan. M>. Ifter the very 
excellent menu Professor Rand rave ■ 

iesiimi : oi the present theatrical season 

in New fork. I'rcsideni Marl in ami 

Hanagei Llndskos i bm remlals- 

censes ol l be nip* I hal the Roister Dois- 
leis had made. 

,\i the regular buslnew meeting that 

followed it was voted to iieale the office 

oi Electrician-Carpenter, compel! I Ion In 
be open to J union and Bopbomores. 
Ail wish i nu to compete .should hand 
their names to Manager [Jndskog. 

James Maples '90 oi Ton Chester, V 
\ , negui latins. i"i i d.ne 10 bring the 
Prom. Sboa to thai town. 




ANNUAL SOPHOMORE-FROSH 
DEBATE TO BE HELD MARCH 7 

| i ., ,1 IP4M) and IMS will me.l 

each other i» adebate on March 7, in 
ssaembiy. 

The subject has eol been definitely 
chosen, but will probably be on the 

Male rniveisily-M. A. C. question, and 
should he of iuteiesl lo Ihe whole MU- 
dent bodj 

Klliot Dodge is managing Ihe Iwmt 
learn and has it well organized. 



^'()u set- what you get before 
you order ! 

Evening dresa clothes : fabrics 
identical with the lu-st New York 

tailors ; price about hall. 

i he beel of c mi) i in hi: collega sma wear. 
Hall orders filled. 

KouKKs IV.kt Company 

Broadway Herald Square 

at nth si "Four al :'» r >ih st 

Con venient 

Broadway Ooroere" Fifth Ave. 

.a Ifarraa al 41mi si. 

Nl W VnlCK <ri'V 



1924 INDEX PROSPECTS 

The holer is rapidly taking shape, 

and the Board states thai they will pul 
out a corking booh and pul it om on 
lime. One oi tbti j Bar's features la ■ 
number ol clever pen and Ink sket< 

by "buss" Ne 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami oihei food 1 1 1 1 m; h to set. 
MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Mlilille Mreat, t*t.4»a-W) lt;*.ll*»y. Mass 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

i 'nine in :mii nv y«'in kor* between eea \. m.. 
n. and s h i . m.. i tec, leth. 

HIZNRY ADAMS & CO. 

r#»o Rom all Store 

The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weehly or Transient. 

CATERING to Anto 

Parties by Appointment 
Open under new mana ■ ment 

I'. D. IIOM \.\S, 

Prop. 

Tel. i*9 W 



Salted Almonds 
Salted Pistachios 



Salted Pecans 



Salted Spanish Peanuts 
Salted Jumbo Peanuts 



College Candy Kitchen 



Don't Forget our Sunday Night Suppers. 



f 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7, 1913. 



TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. ^_____ 
BOARD OF EDITORS. 

I., thick "• ARK>n«T'>n 28 Msnastng Editor 
1)KI'AI!TMKNT 111 AUS! 

lllYINO W. Sl.M'K "23 
Al.ltKIlT K. W A I OH'24 
I.KWIH II. KBITS "26 
1,1 llll.K B. AltltrNOION '23 

aaowas L. <>" ' , " "- 5 
jobs <i. Bbab "24 

ClIAIU.KB f. Oil \ Kit. Jit. "2f> 

KMII.Y (i. HMITH "25 

ruth m. Woon "24 

JOHN M. WHITTISK'M 



Editorial. 

Athletics. 

A<'»(leiiit< s. 
<'riii|>uh. 



Faculty. 
Two-Year. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
0v >K K. FOL.OM '28 HusmessManaaar 

BOUKt K. BTSna 1« Adv.rtl.lng Manager 
Cumil, L, BBUHBM "24 Circulation Manager 

Do«au> w. L*wis«ss Datis Ifexosi « 

(ill.KKKT .1. llAOWI.EK 25 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
•oribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered at Mcond-class matter at the Amherst 
Pott Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 1108. Act 
# f October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



REV. MOSES R. LOVELL TALKS 
ON "THE PRESENT DAY LIFE" 
At Sunday Chapel on Fel.. 4 Rev. 
Mokcs R. Lovell gave a very Stirring 
Hcimon on the present day life oi Ainer- 
0A0 people. The speaker pointed out 
the decline of public morals in the last 
two minerations, and showed that the 
keyword of modern psychology is ex- 
pression rather than repression. 

According lo the speaker, the normal 
influence of a man today is to line out 
what is in him, and to slip into the 
stream of living, letting nature take 
care of him. This feeling hasdominatcd 
American life, so that people are merely 
assuming that that progress, which 
,..,„ t(( . DM only through hard struggles 
and efforts, will come to then, of itself 
miaidtd. However, the speaker sh(. wed 
that sooner or later every uian woul.l 
desire to become the master of bis life, 
inor<ierto make the most of it. Rev. 
Mr. Lowell nave his slogan of living: 
"Knlist your life in the service of your 

work." 

Rev. Mr. Lovell is a recent graduate 
of Boston University, and being at prs* 
sent intimately known to many stu- 
dents of New Hampshire State College 
was especially fitted to speak in Sunday 
Chapel. His talk left the student body 
something to think about. 



M. A. C. BUDGET, CURRENT MAINTENANCE, 1923 



Hi pens— 
ion 



Approprt- Amount 
atlon.lWB! Request- 
ed. 19-28 



Campus News 



SCOTTISH SINGERS TO GIVE 
ENTERTAINMENT HERE FEB. 9 

Under the auspices of the Social 
Union, the Scottish Musical Comedy 
Company will present on Friday night, 
Feb. ft. at tt-BO, a one-act sketch "The 
Cottar's Saturday Night." The play is 
based upon Robert Bars*' poem. The 
sketch follows the suggestion of this 
poem. It is thought the home which 
Rums pictured, was his own. At least, 
he gave a vivid picture of the peasant 
life of Scotland around 17JX). The 
elder bairns who worked in the fields, 
were accustomed to spend each Satur- 
day night with the home folks. Some- 
times a neighbor or two would drop in 
for songs, stories, and other homely 
pleasures. 

The following songs will be sung dur 
lag the sketch: "John Anderson, My 
Joe," "Laddie)," "Hurrah for the High- 
lands," "Ye Hanks and Braes." "Scots 
Wba Hae." "Duncan tiray." "Loch 
Lomond," "Annie Laurie." "Bonnie 
Mary," "<>' a" the Airts," "Wert Thou 
in the Caultl Blast," "A Man's a man 

for a' Thai," "The Auld Hoose. l'he 

Lord's My Sbeperd," "Auld Lang 
Syne." ^^^^^^^^___^_ 

FORTY-TWO COUPLES ENJOY 

SATURDAY'S INFORMAL 



LANDSCAPE TALK TONIGHT 

All those interested in Landscape are 
invited toattend the lectuie by W. U. 
Hatch on golf course construction. It 
will take place at French Hall, room H 
at 7-30 p, m. Wednesday. Feb. 7. Re- 
freshments will bo served. 



Personal services: 
Administration, 
Instruction. 
General Maintenance. 
Experiment Station. 
Extension Service. 
Market (iarden Field Station, 
Short Courses, 
Maintenance: 
Travel, Otlice and other expenses, 
Teaching, laboratory supplies and 

equipment, 
Experiment Station supplies, equipement, 

ami publications. 
Experiment Station travel and ofliee 

expenses, 
Extension Service supplies, equipment, 

travel, etc., 
Short Courses, 
Heat, Light and Power, 
Farm, 

Repairs, ordinary 
Replacements, 

Market Garden Field Station, 
Fertilizer Law Control, 
Poultry Disease Law, 
Milk-testing inspection Law, 
Trustees' Expenses, 
Printing Reports, 
Commercial Feedstuff's, 



|4t,180.88 

184.440.9S 

U5.M4.S6 

50,014.81 

50,896.81 

5,458.54 

47,41*. -28 



*42,020 

181,875 

118, (KM) 

60,(HK) 

52.2IM) 

rt.(KK) 

48,000 



$37,850 

108,080 

122.500 

72,420 

52.180 

6,000 

5B.227 



Recom- 
mended 
in Gov. 

Hudeet 
$37,600 
lft2,000 
118,000 

65,000 

50,000 
6,000 

62,600 



42,544.50 45,000 48,695 42,500 

55,800.56 55,000 55,000 55,000 

lB,61ft.l» 14,000 16,000 14.000 

4,081.81 B.300 4,000 4.000 



81,108.89 
11,798.16 
84,089.61 

18,447.76 
30,845.2:1 
95,688.91 

3,624.85 
12,061.80 

6,135.61 
631.30 
874.07 

1 ,966.81 

7,011.18 



35,000 
12,000 
50.000 
22,000 
85,000 

25.000 
3,000 

13,000 
6,000 
600 
1,200 
2,000 
7,000 



40,000 
11,000 
19,000 

20,000 
25,000 
40,609 

4,000 
14,500 
7,000 
600 
1,200 
2,000 
9,000 



35,000 
12,000 
72,000 
20,000 
25.000 
37,500 
3,200 
13,500 
7,000 
600 
1,200 
2, IKK) 
7,500 



$841,189.40 $H4!,!85 $913,852 $873,200 



STATE BUDGET, SPECIALS, 1923 



SOPH-SENIOR HOP COMMITTEE 

At a recent meeting of the Sopho- 
more class, t he Soph-Senior Hop coin- 
niitee was elected. The members are: 
Hale, chairman; Duffey, Cahill, HaiS- 
eo.nb.and Barnes. The Sen. or mem- 
bers of the committee are Bucklev and 
Sargent. 

FROM S0UIBBY 

Thanks, everybuddy, fer pomes, pic- 
ters, jokes, an so forth. Von done 
bsoofal. We new you wood. 

SorniHY. 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page 1 



Chemical laboratory and equipment. 

Improvements at power plant, 

Improvements at Tillson Farm, 

I -iboratorv, horticultural manufactures. 

nevelopmen. of market garden field station, Waltham, 

Women's gymnasium. 

Addition to rural engineering shops and equipment, 

Roads, . . ,. 

fool sheds and garage, division of hort.culture. 

Live stock replacement, 

Calf barn. 

Superintendent's cottage, Tillson farm. 

Fencing fruit plantations, 

New walks, 

BradlBg and draining addition to athletic held, 

Laud for cranberry station, East Wareham, 



Amount Re- 
quested. MM 

$150,000 

39,250 

5,000 

38,000 

25,000 

15.000 

16,000 

8,000 

6,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

3,000 

2,500 

2,500 

1,000 



Recom- 
mended 

$150,000 
No 
5,000 
No 
No 
No 
No 
8,000 
6,000 
5,000 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 



$1125,250 $174,000 



Saturday's Informal was even a little 
better than the previous ones. Forty- 
two couples were present making it the 
largest crowd so far of the school year. 
Dancing started immediately after the 
game and continued to nine o'clock. 
Wood worth's orchestra played and it 
seemed to get better and better in every- 
way as the evening went on. H. E. Car- 
ter of Amherst was the caterer. 

Time-keepers, referees and lines- 
women : 

For the Mountain— Mrs. Cameron. 

For the River-Miss Varmalee. 

For the land-in-between — Mrs. Smith. 

First half lengthened by two extra 
periods; second half shortened by order 
of lime-keeper. 



this country until she viewed it from 
another. Just as we would cross the 
street to get the true effect of our own 
trout door, so you must leave this 
country to gain a true perspective of it. 
We should be law-keepers, not law- 
breakers, for whenever such misdeeds 
as riots, lynching, and the like are re- 
ported throughout the globe we are 
erroneously missrepresented in the eyes 
Of other people. Race riots, which have 
placed such a colossal stigma on the 
name of America, are the direst result 
of selfishness and ignorence. 

If we could bear civilization in a more 
understanding way ; if we could all live 



orange: store 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fwuit* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician ««<» Jsrwesis**' 

9 Pleasant Street (np one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks and other Reliable Makes 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 

Wednesday. Thursday. Friday and Saturday. J«lU»a4M 
NORMA TALMADGE I" "THE ETERNAL FLAME 
A Brilliant Romance of the French Court. 8 Splendid Keels. 
,, ether with WILL ROGERS In " FRUITS OF FAITH » 



as lawful citizens, then this world would 
be a cleaner, safer place to live in. 
What civilization needs today is speci- 
alists, men expert in their own line, 
with the desire of world development in 
their hearts, lusted of jazzy syncopation 
and trashy literature we needto see and 
hear more of the classics. Our moral 
and esthetic tases require more vigour- 
ous cultivation. In concluding, Miss 
Woolley quoted from "Mirroe la Down- 
ing Street" as follows: -'the world needs 
more of the Puritan in character; more 
of the Helenic in mind; more of the 
Christ-like in soul." 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 

With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up- 
See them in our window 

Page'® Shoe Store 

C*rptrvUr fit Morehoust, 
PRIiNTEnS, 

No ,, Cook Plaea, Amherat, Maae. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7, 1923. 



" Kvi'ry generation laughs ut I In- old fashion* Imt follows rrligi<n*l> i li < now." 
This better store for college men shows the batter things first! CONST 1/1 WALSH 



tv 



The Profit in Quality 

Creamery men, Cheeseinakers a n d 
Dairymen operate their plants for one 
purpose only— to make and accumulate 
profits. 

They realize too, that only by pro- 
ducing the highest quality milk foods 
at the lowest possible production coat, 
can their margin of profit be increased. 

Nothing is proving more ■Sceataful in 
the elTort to attain these results than 
the rapidly increasing use of 



This pure, inorganic, greaselcss clean- 
er is so pure anil purifying, ami cleans 
clean with so little effort, that its effi- 
ciency has loag been established in the 
Dairy industy. Its use insures against 
uncleanliness, bad odors and other 
causes of deterioration and loM of qual- 
ity in milk products. 

Moreover, its absolute uniform qual- 
ity, dependable work, free rinsing prop- 
erties and harmless nature, all ion- 
tribute toan unusually towelaaaiug '"■' 

Indian in 
cln le 



Ask your supply man. 



in every 
package 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacture 1 1 
Wyandotte, Mich. 




MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

•ELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prices. 
Inform*!* m Specialty 

12 Ho. Prosiiect St.. Amherst. .Mass 

Fe/. BBB-M 



After 
Every 
Meal 



WRIGLEYS 



and give your 
stomach a lift. 

Provides " the bit of 

sweet" In beneficial 
form. 

Helps to cleanse 
the teetb and keep 
them healtby. 




TOWN REPRESENTATIVES 

BOOST M. A. C. IN STATE 



New System Promises Much Help 
to College. 

\ little more tbaaayeai ami a half 
ago i he Collect inaugurated the system 

ot ToWU ltc presenlaiivcs ami today 

there are represent at Ives ol the College 
in 868 of the 80S townships ol the 
•late. Before long mails ever] town 
will he represented. 

W'hai it a Town Representative >>i M. 
v. i'. .' lie is i he representative ol lbs 
College to his town and ■ represent alive 

of the town to the College, lie 

clearing house of Information, Be brings 
to the College suggestions and erliiclsmi 
ami requests for information or assist* 

a nee. 

beading men ami women are selected 
aa Town Representatives b) the 'bounty 
agent or someone who knows the Influ- 
ential people. They may be leading 
farmers, school superintendents, busi- 
nessmen It matters Utile what all are 
outstanding personalities whose word 
carries weight, about one-third of t be 

Town lie present a I ives already appointed 

are alumni oi the College, and it is 
planned to make of each Town Repre- 
sentative a person sympathetic with 
ihr Ideas of the College and well in- 
lorined aboul i he < fcillege. 

Several definite objectives have been 
piaeed before tbeae representatives; A 
boy a yeai lo entei M. A. < . from each 
town ; a group ol higii school pupils to 
attend High School Daj each year; and 
the arranging of local study groups In 
connection with the Extension Service. 
There is plenty of wort to* Town Repre 
Mutative*. The granting oi scholarships 
by local organise! ions, publicity In local 
papers, handling traveling exblbllaol 

the Col lei;.-, and many Others, have l>'-cii 

suggested by the T<>wn Representatives 

themselves. The Town Representative 
plan is still in its infancy hut its Inline 

promises ataob. 



MR. C. S. GENNESS ADDRESSES 
WINTER SCHOOL STUDENTS 
Mi. ( . B. Genness, manager of the 
market garden operation of lbs Boston 
Gardening Company at VTabaa spoke 
to the winter school regetable garden- 
ing students ontbesubject "i "Vege- 
table Forcing Connected with General 
Karm operations." Mr. GenneSS has 

charge of BvegTeeabousesajOOft, i sOft. 

ami this winter has been building a 
sixth bouse 88a ft. n 68 tt. Several for- 
mer Aggie students with training lu 
regetable gardening have bees with 

Mr. tienness and he slated that he was 
looking for three more this com ins: 
season. 



Old Dcerficia fertilizers 

" Reasonmble in dollar* and sens** 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield, Ma»s> 

Alex's Lunch Room 

Formerly <>f the Candy Kitchen. 
OVER BOLLES' SHOE STORE 

SPECIAL NOON-DAY DINNERS AT 51*— Food and Service ot Highest 
Quality. The Best Coffee in Town- Buy ■ $5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.<H) 

Hours. 7 \. M. to i-(X) A. If. 

The place thai made good over niolit "Come up and luing; your frienda." 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

— DaUl 1 U in — 

DRV AND FANCY GOODS 









2 




1 
1 







SUMMER CAMP PLANNED FOR 
NEXT JULY FOR FIFTY BOYS 

During the month ol July, a summer 
camp foi boys will be held hare. Tbe 
tamp will he limited to 80 boys between 
the ages at 18 and 18. The purpose ot 

this camp erlll be to lastruel the hoys in 
am icul i ure ami in constructive reel 
lion. ( barges will be at the rate ..I 
sin per week. The camp will hv under 
the iopervision of the field secretary and 

the HUpervisoi of extension schools. 



GET THE STYLE THE PERFECT FIT 
THE INFLUENTIAL QUALITY OF 

Nettleton Shoes 



I heir feel oi fineness is an inspiration, and 
out reduced prices are final in shoe economy. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct- MENS OUTFITTER exclusive 

The House of Kuppenheimer (i<»>tl ( 'lothcs 







He Reached the Top 



T 



HE Vice-President of a great life insurance 
company who began his career as an agen t 
has this to say to seniors who are about to 
graduate from co!lc^<-: 

"If you love wo;k and diiirc t<> pursue an honorable, 
useful and lucrative mission in lift this ii the bvuin 
for you to take up. Life Insurance i ilesmanship </ifers 
a fine ii M (or the energies of the splendid young men 
in our c 

"Th.'.t this i I »rue is demr I by those college men 

who ha insurance for they ha ve shown 

tha' ii. man at fit tor this kind of a yob snd 

that ti. : ■ fit f< r the college rrun. 

•The work < f the life insurance salesman to distinguished 

hy independent eand opportunity for directing his own. 

It gives all possible opportunity for individual initiative 

and a chance to make an ample incon ■ when 

t fellows are struggling on a wage pittsne 

Thar is the story of one who began at the bottom and 
reached the top without the help of a college educa- 
tion. The advantage! are with you who graduate 
from college. Before deciding your career make in- 
quiries of the "Agency Department 




%kJk 



;* {j ' 




Life Insurance Company 

or Boston. Massachusetts 
Largest Fiduciary Institution in Sew England 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7, IMS. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 by mall- 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



Faculty 



Opportunities For 

SUMMER WORK 

Now available by 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY 



Uteofrrapble Works 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Topographical otVu-es 
Cheater, Vermont 



Wi'sn-rii Salt's Oface 

Cleveland, Ohio 



For partteolan see 
SAMUEL CUTLER '26, 75 Pleasant St. 



NORFOLK SUITS 

Grays, browns and mixtures, in weight suitable for year 'round 
wear. Special reductions to clear our stocks for Inventory, reb. ist 

These are worth looking over. 

Priced from $26.00 up 

F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



| The Value of a Good Record 

AHAjri ■■COW) gfwel** *•»»■•• hUaet waaltf . He* mmw Mm ; *>> 
m ... LLi.y wba, h- eei *~ ....... aa> ... iM. Bart Jar ht *«* 
Tor t. no.,,- VM .- *•" •"<>"> Ht..- a** „r taM te«kta .,■.•» r«i. 
,•„ K r w .'..».. M he u.ust ,, btte. .-by than ta iW I**-** «. b.-m-r to- 
iSU £» ..- t»m t...ia>. .. b with — MM . » M it is .Hi men. 

XLbe Boston Evening TLtatisctipt 

is Mtrtae * haa*e*» Meteanv. " «» »•"«■■ u wiUl ,1,e ' Mvn "'" ]iU T^u!' 
.,,,,,.■ hundred than H H MOW at ..liiety-tw... a MWieaeef H «•» ■ *...- 

,,.."■" s u '—i.... ». is— that »• bom 10 Mr. for a -lav TI., oart of 

spirit, its reputation. 

« h-.,v i. a« tacoanae la ■■mpanwa u ft to la am. what the moid at the 

XSSm « S to as . ZSZ ******* . * In* UN *"S hi «* n.aoner 

^ 1,, U.elf an.1 Wta the *•*** 1 .«.-,,..t. 8 e.f-re 8 ,K.«-t.M K pe.,.l-. . l.at 

that it Ml rwi , n ,ai.m.. glvlmr rept.tah.e a.lv.-rt *** opportunity to 

r i> 7, e^nere tlver til* Lam -fottabto return-, its ,,,,...•.* an,! a.lw-tis.-rs 

ZESXZi ;».,:;«..- «• — - ■ ■*—— ■*- it — ,,a " *•*"* 



FACULTY NOTES 

Doctor llano of the MuroSiolony 
Department lectured to the ftfloiobl- 
Olog} BO clam on " Hy<ln.(iei>-ion Con- 
centration" last week. With delicate 
and beauliful testa, the leetBte* were 
as lateiaatlBg as a conjurer's tricks. 

Dr. Hano is an excellenl an.1 easily 
o.nii.ivl.en.le.l speaker, ami the lecture 
was much enjoyed. 

DEAN MACHMER SPEAKS AT 
METHODIST CHURCH JAN. 28 

On Sunday,. Ian. 88, Dean Machnier 
spoke at the Methodist church on the 
choice of a vocation. His talk covered 
the difference between professional and 
Boa-pxofeaatoaal pursuits, the demands 

made by them on the individual and 
what should be (he geld* light! in 
eboeelag a life work. 

in reference ... .he latter as pertain, 
las t.. agricaltan be stated that the 

n aa with a love of the outdoors and 
not too deeply interested in cash in- 
come and rapid turnover would act 
wisely in obooeleg farming as a mean, 

of livelihood. 

In chapel Friday, Feh. I, he chose for 

his topic "A Meaaace te Gareia"eav 

phaeiatng the moral of the story, as 
timely today as ever, that our work 
■hOttld be carried out to the best of out- 
ability, not betaf U» much dependent 

on exterior help and traMlng "'"' »« 

heel is sufficient. These aphorisms so 
often heard and so seldom heeded are 
applicable lO any line of endeavor 
whether in art. science, industry, or 
scholaslic work. 

Dean Machmer will address the mem- 
dersof the Christian Kndeavor at I heir 
banquet this week on some relevant 

■abject. 



ALUMNI 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itself. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Repairing While U Walt 

nkw mucks 

Men's Whole Soles. Kuhher Heels . . *2.50 

Mens Half Sole*-. Iiut.be. Heels . . . »1." 

Men's Bobber *ol«§. Rubber Heeto . w.« 

Men's Half Soles •*»■ 

W,„k Ouaranteed-AMHKKST HOUBK 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SOOA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

Cimn and ( iirai'ttes Spe. ia. pri.e per carton 
on CiisaretteH. 

lefaraaVi Cboedatet »ad etbet leading lines. 
Cracker* and Oannmd Good* 

"PHOENIX" SILK STOCKINGS 

Are Prominent An... nif the 
I •■anions Makes We Feature 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

is a ifoo.l value for women who want the best 

there is In a seamless stocking that yet 

Mill lit ttie ankles trimly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

lluy your pressiim ticket from It. Oanizue '23 

FULL DRESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

mcumn iaiaae. TO RENT or FOR SALE 

Home Brum. Neckwear 

Older vour next Suit or Overcoat here now. 
Itest selection! of Woolens iii the lateBt pat 
lernsa'uUson .,.,,... The hiuh uuality o o», 
work is apparent on fancy uanuents Try us. 

LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Haberdasher. 

11 AmitySt. Next to Western rnion Tel. Otti.e 



Quality Footwear 

We have just completed our twenty-fifth year in the shoe business 
and have established a standard of quality of our own. This stand- 
ard has come to be recognized by our customers and it is a tangible, 
visible, good-will asset that has shown itself in the steady growth 
of our business 

While it is our constant aim to sell footwear at lower prices, it 
will not be done at the expense of our standard of quality. 

Yours for Good Footwear, 

E. M. BOLLES 



The New England Nuisciy men's As- 
social ion is a very live organization and 
held its annual meeting Jan. 80>S1 la 
IJosl.m with an impoitanl program. 
Much of thecnerny shown in this OT- 
gaaiaatloa is due to the president, K. K. 

(.iiiett. at. a.c:. 1908, ol Booth wick, e 

widely haowa RTOWer Of nursery stock, 
:iml es|.ccially of the native plants. 

'IS.— Bolaad H. Pateh comes to life 
in the January bulletin of the.Mneri- 
ean Dahlia .Society «'"' :»» extended 
report from the society's trial gardens. 
Mr. Pateh is ptOfeaaorof Floriculture at 
Connecticut Auriculnual College where 
these trial grenade are located in his 
charge. 

T3. -H. lb Hursley has just been 
elected to the American Society of 
Landscape Architects. He is now with 
K. B. Draper '15, Charlotte, H. C , where 
several other M. A. C. men are working. 
1.-,.- Herbert Archibald, who is now 
principal of Natick High School, is to 
brinE bis basketball team here and 
play the following aaaee: Deerfield, 
Feb. 22; M. A.C. Two-year, Feb. '£*: 
M.A.t'. 1898, Feb. 24. 

>19— Oliver C. Hoberts, who has been 
■laying ai the ThetaChl house, says he 

expects to go back to his obi .matters 

at I'rof. "Charlie Gould's next week. 
'21.— Howard F. "Sammie" Sampson 

was here last week-end for a short 
visit. He ll taking a graduate course 
at Yale and is almost as strong a boost- 
er of Vale as he is of Aggie. "A great 
place,** sa>s >am. 

'22.— Marjory Richardson is now en- 
gaged in teaching wotk at the Belcher- 

, town High school. 



1924 AND 1923 

Aggie Stationery 

39c per box 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst • - ' Ma8i 



The Largest and Best Assortment 

— OK— 

College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

IN< OKCOKATKI) 

273-270 High St., Hcd^ 

Tal. WB2-WB3 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 7, 1923. 



Yours truly, 

Where you bot the i shade, 

THE NEW COLLEGE STORE 



_TKY ~ Short Courses 

C. H. GOULD 

for tirst class TWO YEAR TEAM LOSES TO 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing DEERFIELD AND AMHERST 



13 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



NOVICK & SOCKUT 

Custom Tailors 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



The g*Teai baskethall tea i«-l with 

two moie reverses lasi week, being de- 
feated by Deerfield Academy on Jen. :u 

ami Amherst High on Feh. 'J. 
The summaries: 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hours: 

Monday. Tuesday, \\ cin.sday . Thurs- 
day, Sat unlay. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Gocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

II'SA HAPPY FEELING, ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

11 1-2 Amity St. 

Amherst Book Store 



SlAllQNm 



Wa 



1-Year. 

Bemide, rt 

Merchant, If 
Parsons, c 
Tu ft 8, rg 
Parke, Ig 

Stover, c 



1 
1 

II 
II 

I 
1 

r. 

... 

I 

n 
x 


ti 

1 

11 
Score -Deerfiald 2H. g-Year 14. 

2-Year c 

Baralde, rt u 

">|. reheat, it :i 

Stover, c 1 

Buraett, rg i 

I'llllS. Ig I) 



Deerfield. 
Zorodnlek, rt 

(oilllii. It 

At kinsoii, c 
Cook, ig 

Butterneld, ig 

Hayes. 



r. 



Ainheisl High. 

Flebllt, 

Kelley,J 

Si long, 

Dowd, 

II. lilowil, 

K. IJrown, 



r> 

... 
:i 
■i 
:>. 

1 
1 

l» 



ti 

r. 

4 



Beore An. heist 24, 2- Year In. 

SHORT COURSE NOTES 

Last Tboradaj evening In. in 7 :iti to 
11-00 ociock Ihe memhers ot the tee 

weeks course gave a reception to the 
Two-year siu.ieuis le Memorial Hall. 
Music for daaeine. was faraiebed by 
Woodworth's oreheetre aed theehaner. 

ones were l'rof. and Mrs. M< l.aughlin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Hanna and Mrs. Marsh 

The Kulonv Kluh and A. T. <>. arc to 

hold an Inter-Hub dance from T-'io to 

11-lM) next Saliirday evening in (be 
Memorial Building. 



"Ct! 



T. 15. K.. the Mile» cluh of the It'll 
week's students has recently lieen re- 
organized anil li now taking in new 

members. 






)nst received a new 



Metiilieis ot i lie Two year class are 

now being given the opportunity "I 

tint:, from a number of designs 

poated in the shot'i-course olliee. their 

choice of course pins. 



Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal! A P»»« '• '"' w U8d " w;,v "' "«*['"** 

p ' a club, the membership Of which is to 

raper, called "The Dyplomatic. h( . IIi;u)e up e „tireiy ef Two>... 

students who live in New York. 



See our window. 



C. F. DYER 



"i:t.— L. A. Beiun is now the county 
agent in Berkshire county. 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

Academic Activities, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Assoi iation, 

Track Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hockey Association. 

Basketball Association, 

Roister I blisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical ( hibs. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Trll'lilliUie 

Rich. ml afellen, \ss't Sec. 175 I 
Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 

C. s. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 

Frank P. Rand, Manager 136 R 

Roger B. Fiieiul, President 720 

Perry (J. Bartlett, Manager 
John M. Whittier, Manager 
Ch.iilcs \Y. Steele, Manager 
Irving W. Slade, FdiL.t 
Finest T. Putnam, Manag. 1 
Philip B. Dowden. Manager 
Ciustav Lindikog, Managei 
Trescott T. Abele, Fditor 



»3«S 

170 

170 

53° 
861 W 



Thomas L. Snow, Manager 



720 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, Owen F. Folsoin, M riagei 8314 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard I!. Smith, Manager 8314 
M. A.. C. Christian Association, Frederick B.Cook, President X330 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask us to show you whatever you may he 
interested in. If yotl don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doing business on this 
basis. I'. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do liiijli grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge* Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1.70 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 cts per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are Goodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 









■ 



i 









8 



Th e y-rh «m Collegian. Wednesday. February 7, lM. 



NEW CREATION IN NECKWEAR 

JUST ARRIVED-Son,* nc«, Foulards in the M^U^ ^ 

,-,, _ to « tne r o„ *W *- ^££j£j c £ BR OTHER3 * GAULT 



Let's get together 



CO-ED NOTES 



poring the pas< ■"»**, ,ll "' , ' • ,l,ni " 1 ' 
Extension clubs similar to elaba eon- 

dueled at the Abbey lael >••»' »» ve 

i „ started. Martha Kpp-. M:,1 > 

Foley, and Kathleen Adameare serving 
as dub leaden under Iba direction el 
i-,,.,,;, c Rrbard, M. A. U. W, »«"» '■ 
Club Agent fot Bampsbire County. 
All three eluba bare daetded upon aew- 
lag M their projeel. Tbe eluba ere 
composed of llrla from Amberat aad 
North Amherst schools, principally el 
pjirla troei lea to Bfcaaa yeaw el age. 
i„ all, there are about thirty member*, 
bmmI of whom are begianlDg elnb work 
this fear. Kaeb elab followa wbaf la 
ealled aerogram," wbleh meana thai 
each girl i" ibe elab aiabea i certain 
number ot ganaeate, darae Hocking*, 
does > eertaia eaejber ol boura bouee- 
w.»rk. keeps a record ol time end naonej 
■peat, writes a itory ol ber work, eed 
exbtblta eoaie of it eboni May i el an 
exhibition in Hemorial Hall, 

There are several programa bom 
eaaoag which members ebooee -""• ec 
eordiag as they ere reed j for beginning 
M advanced work. iSaefa elab meeta 
once » week. Often bare been 
elected aad one-tblrd of tbe boar each 
week will be deeoted to ■ baeleeei 
meeting. Tbe remaining two-tblrdeol 
the lime is eqaali] divided between 
Mwlng ami games. 

Mrs. K.-iiyon U ButtertteM lias In- 
vited all women atadente to a tea to be 
given a i "Hlllelde" Saturday, feb. 10. 
Tea will he served from i till <>• 

The Women's .Student Covcinmciil 

Association held ■ short meeting at tbe 
Abbey Tuesday to dlaeaea several 
regulatione. 

Delta Phi Gamma lias begun making 
plans for its annual Valentine dance. 
Tbe exact dele fortbedance baeaotyel 
been decided upon. 

At the Station Seminar hel.l Monday 

this week in reraald Hall, the rceearefa 

projects of the Entomology Department 
were presented by Dr. Fernald. A gen- 
eral discussion followed, in which mem- 
bers of other department offered aug- 
geetioea apoa tbe work, aad In which 

new subjects on which Investigation is 

needed were mentioned. 

The fifth of a series of mectinge of 
the town repreeeatativea will be held le 
Greenfield Feb. 8, wbea tbe town rep- 
reeeatativea uf Franklin county get to- 
gether. December saw meetinga held 
in Plymouth, Brtatol, and Bar nat able 
counties; representatives of Middlesex 
county met in January, and Norfolk 
county is making arrangements for a 
meeting to be held the last of February. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Knickerbockers can no longer DC 

worn to olaaaea a< Hounl Bolyoke Ool- 
lege, ae a result of a rnllog mad* re- 

( . ( .,,,lv by tbe Dean oi Women. Knick- 
ers have been worn throughout the day 

by i >Ol the women of the college. 

The authorities do Sol condemn Ibe 
Wearing Of knickers, bUl console them 

inappropriate In Ibe eiaaaroom. 

James •'Jim" lAlrd, a former Colgate 
star aiblete, has been appolated sesls- 
taat coach of ibe Norwich University 

athletic learns. 



|. T seniors recently voted in 
favor Ot the use of the cap and gOWO 
t . , i commencement exercises. The caps 

' and gowna have never been worn ai 

lech, and a lively meeting was held be 
I,,,.- the vote was Dually taken. 

The Harvard Crimean celebrated its 

50th annivcisary on Jan. 24. The (Mm- 
sun is one of I he oldest college BOWe- 
papers in the country. 

Dartmouth atudeata are playing ibe 

rdle Of lumberjacks in a moving picture, 

"Baekb ■.'" which is being lilmed 

near Wootlstock. Vt. 



President huacaof Browa Ualveraltj 

has issued a statement heartily endors- 
ing compulsory chapel attendance. He 

says thai H belpe to create unity of feel- 

log and of action, and to increase mil 
tual acquaintance in college. 

Tnfi- has reduced the football sched- 
ule io seven games for next year. A 
game with Harvard will be played on 
Nov. I, and the season will wind up 
with ■ gasae on Nov. 17. 

Cornell University has seventy-live 

basketball teanae. Cornell baa aleo re- 
instated fencing as a minor sport. 




STEAM CYLINDER, 



They Weighed Air 
and Charles II Laughed 




DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



AMUEL PEPYS says in 
his diary that CharlesII, 
for all his interest in the 
Royal Society, laughed 
uproariously at its members 
"for spending their time only in 
weighing of air and doing nothing 
else since they sat." 

This helps to explain why 
Charles has come down to us as 
the "merry monarch." 

The Royal Society was engaged 
in important research. It was try- 
ing to substitute facts for the 
meaningless phrase "nature ab- 
hors a vacuum," which had long 
served to explain why water 
rushes into a syringe— the com- 
monest form of pump— when the 
piston is pulled out. 

Denis Papin had as much to do 
as anyone with these laughable 
activities of the Royal Society. 
Papin turned up in London one 
day with a cylinder in which a 
piston could slide. He boiled water 
in the cylinder. The steam gener- 
ated pushed the piston out. When 
the flame was removed, the steam 



condensed. A vacuum was formed 
and the weight of the outer air 
forced the unresisting piston in. 

Out of these researches eventu- 
ally came the steam engine. 

London talked of the scandalous 
life that King Charles led, and paid 
scant attention to such physicists 
as Papin, whose work did so much 
to change the whole character of 

industry. . 

The study of air and air pumps 
has been continued in spite of 
Charles's laughter. IntheGeneral 
Electric Company's Research 
Laboratories, for instance, pumps 
have been developed which will ex- 
haust all but the last ten-billionth 
of an atmosphere in a vessel. 

This achievement marks the 
beginning of a new kind of chemis- 
try—a chemistry that concerns 
itself with the effect of forces on 
matter in the absence of air, a 
chemistry that has already en- 
riched the world with invaluable 
improvements in illumination, ra- 
dio communication, and roentgen- 
ology. 



General||EleJtric 



9 cner.l Office COlUpany SckttiU*** 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 






Vol. XXXIII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 14, 1923. 



No. 16 



W. P. I. DEFEATS AGGIE I Norwegian newspapers 



20-16 IN LIVELY GAME 



VERSUS AMERICAN TYPE 



Bike and Sharpe Score High. 

The Worcester Tech five trimmed the 
Mass. Aggie hasketerH last Wednesday 
at Worcester in a 20-16 game. The 
home team was always in the lead and 
were never threatened by tbe Aggies 
until a tardy rally came in the last 30 
seaonds netting two baskets. A good 
crowd was out for the game and they 
made a good impression on the visiting 
team. Sharpe shone on tbe Moor for 
Worcester and Eddie Bike for Mass. 
Aggies. 

The summary : 

WOKCKBTKK 



Mr. Arne Kildal Stresses Solidity and 
Effect of His National Press. 



Delphos, If 
Sharpe, rf 
Berry, c 
White, Ig 
Biggins, rg 



B. 


F. 








4 





2 


4 


1 





1 






Mr. Arne Kildal, Norwegian Press 
lie present alive at Washington, 1). ('., 
gave a very interesting talk on the Nor- 
wegian press showing the ureal differ* 
fine existing between the Norwegian 
newspaper and our own daily. This 
comparison put our own newspapers, in 
some respects at least, in a very un- 
favorable light. 

There are two quite notable , facts 
which are common to l.oth countries, 
namely the large number of publica- 
tions for tlie number of people and the 
almost universal use of the daily news- 
'. j papers. Both countries have a ptopor- 
I liornately large number of dailies, most 
8 ! people eoaaldariag the newspaper to ha 

8 1 aa important a factor la their daily ex- 



AGGIE TRIMS WEST POINTERS ON THEIR 

OWN ICE IN THRILLING CONTEST 2 TO 1 



Gordon and Goldsmith Star for M. A. C. Marinelli Scores (or 

West Point. 



TEAM SHOWS WELL AGAINST DARTMOUTH'S CONQUERERS 



2 
2 

20 



M. A. C. 









B. 


F. 


i\ 


Bike, rg 






3 





« 


Hale, lg 






1 





2 


Marsbman, c 






1 





2 


Barrows, rf 






1 


4 





Samuels, If 





















5 


4 


16 


Time-20-rain. 


peri 


>ds. 









JUNIOR PROM PROGRAM 
ANNOUNCED BY COMMITTEE 



Prom Dance on Thursday, April 5. 
Tickets go on Sale Next Week. 

The Junior Prom this year will be 
held the first week of April. Tbe pro- 
gram of events is practically the same 
as usual, and opens with tbe Prom 
dance, Thursday, April 5th at 9-00 p. m. 
in Memorial Hall. Friday night at 
S-00, the Prom show will be held in 
Stockbridge Hall, followed by bouse 
dances in the various Fraternity Houses. 
On Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock will 
be held the Prom Cabaret, consisting of 
a eoncert by the combined musical 
clubs, and a dance. In the evening 
receptions will be held at the Fratern- 
ity Houses. 

The annual Prom concert, under the 
auspices of the Social Union at 3 P. M. 
Sunday in Stockbridge Hall will be the 
final event on the Prom program. 

Tickets will be ou sale beginning thl 
first of next week by all members of the 
Prom Committee. 

The Junior Prom committee is com- 
posed of Charles J. Tewhill of Florence, Rufus W. Stimson. State Supervisor 
chairman; Alfred ?. Gay of Groton.jof Agricultural Education. 
Richard S. Gifford of South West port, 



letaaee as their meals. Political, edu- 
cational, and moial opinions are de- 
rived from such a reglar leading of the 
new pap r , which is tbe ieason why tbe 
Norwegians have such a grasp of their 
international affairs. 

The Norwegian paper contains a dif- 
ferent quality of news from those of 
this country. All scandal, murder, and 
sensational news receives but small at- 
tention from the Norwegian editor. His 
front page may contain announcements 
of late discoveries in science, editorials 
on political affairs, but to a large extent 
is made up of book reviews and re- 
marks concerning forthcoming publica- 
tions. One of the authors that attracts 
much attention is Henrik Ibsen, the 
famous Norwegian dramatist. All 
items of ueneral news are condensed 
into a very small space and are usually 
incomplete and out of date. 

Mr. Kildal had with him several speci- 
mens of leading Norwegian dailes which 
were, however, niinh smaller than our 
ownconsistitigof only about eight pagM. 
He stated that one thing which the Noi- 
wegiati paper shows, that ours does not. 
is the personality of the editor tell. •.ted 
in form and choice of subject material. 
He also said (hat Norway has no real 
funny paper, as we consider it, tboagb 
they have several so-called humorous 

publteaUoaa, of which he showed 

samples. 

The main points which he stressed 
were the lack of sensationalism and th<- 
abundance of more solid material. In 
this respect the Not wegian paper more 
nearly resembled our mont hy magazines 
like the Atlantic Monthly except for 
size. They serve as a means of educa- 
tion. 



TRUSTEES AUTHORIZE NEW 

BUILDINGS FOR COLLEGE 

The trustees of the Massachusetts 

Agricultural Collage i>;i\e authorised 

the preparation of provisional plans for 
a physical education building which 
will also accommodate I he department 
of military science. They haw also 
aathoriaad ■ preliminary study of plans 
lor a dormitory for men. No decision 
has been reached as to when apptopria- 
tions Will be asked loieilhei of theaC 
buildings, but fairly, well developed 
plaaa will be ready in the near tut tire. 



ROBERT W. COE OF NOR- 
WOOD AT SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The speaker in Chapel on SiiimImv. 

Feb. 11, was Bar, Robert W. Ooe, of the 

First Congregational (hutch, Norwood. 
His sermon was concerned mainly with 
methods of accomplishing results. lie 
■poke ln-t ol Faith and its power to 
bring results. He then went on with 
the American people and their 
characteristics. The American people 
are a people of action. He likened 
them, moreover, to children playing on 
the beach with the great ocean of power 
before them— "we are just on the edge 
Of things." 

The eauee of much ef the trouble in 

the world to-day is that every nation is 
suspicious of the others. If each nation 
would show a spirit of forgi venness 
many problems could be solved. WImm 
one shows a spirit of good-will, be 
brings about a spirit of good-will in 
others. 

By the use of the old methods of 
hatred and jealousy we cannot ac- 
complish anything. The great forces 
of right and truth are ours to use. I he 
challenge is this to us: Shall we use 
t be old met hods or tbe new '.' 



Sterling Myrick of Longmeadow, Arthur 
C. Nicoll of Quincy, James J. Williams 
of Sunderland and Robert H. Wood- 
worth of Newton. 



the campus all day Wednesday, Feb. 
14. He would like to meet any men. 
particularly seniors, who are interested 
in teaching agriculture. He may be 
met through Prof. Wells or Mr. Ueald. 



MILITARY DEP'T. HAS NEW 

MAP AND SAND TABLE 

The sand table will be ready for use 
very soon. The moulding sand had 
been put away in burlap bags and bad 
gathered up lint and dirt V hie fa had to 
be sifted out. The military department 
has also just received a new contour map 

[to use in tactical problems. The de- 
partment is making a great effort to 
put Aggie at the top in national organi- 
zation and the new map and sand table 

I have been acquired for that purpose. 



Last Nat unlay afternoon at West 
I'oint the Aggie hockey (earn "made 
history" when they took I he Army 
sextet into camp by the score ol 2-1, in 

one of the best played eoutaataoi the 

season by the lalmer puek-chasels. 
The odds looked bi| egatael I he men 
when they journeyed to the Institution 
OR the Hudson. The week before Dart- 
mouth had beaten tbe Aggies 5*1 aad 
the following Wed need ay tbe ftreej 
had defeated tbe Oreeo teaaa, eo eearj 

Indication pointed to a hard contest ftoi 
the Maloon and White skaleis. The 

eoatatf era* hard, but tbe mull was 

not al all disheartening. Putting on a 
I. land ol hockey that was unbeatable 
the visitors in ... . \ WW) showed their 
superiority over the Cadets, who bad 
all they could do to keep up with 

"Doe" Gordon, who saw every where al 

once. 

The Colli ne-eoaebad athletes led the 
Cadeta a merry ebaee the Bret period, 

bill neither team succeeded in caging 
the rubber. At I he end of (he period 

the Araty playera ebowed theeffeeteol 

the lasl pace Ml by their opponents, 
while the latter weie just getting 
wanned up to the Ira.v. Haul work- 
outs and aillgeal training stood the 
Agriculturists in good stead, and in the 

teeond period they opaaad up a little 

wider. 

The period was the Aggie's from the 
stall, and Captain Gordon proved il 
when alter over 1 1 minutes of fast skat- 
ing he dribbled hallway down the rink 
and lifted the puck by Beane, ibe 
\nny goalleudei.lt was the tirst score 
..I the game, and only served Io liven 
things up the more. The period ended 
with more fast ice work, the Cadets 
showing a little mon- pap and giving 
some opposition. 

After seven minutes of play in the 
third period Marinelli slipped by I he 
Aggie defence ami sneaked the puck by 
Alger for the first, last ami only Army 
tally. It would have served to put 
more action into the Cadets had they 
any left, but it was decidedly lacking, 
and when, four minutes later Cold- 
smith took tbe puck from a Cadet in 

Iron! of bis own goal, and dribbled 
down the middle Of the rink, shot the 
goal from Justin front of defense. It 
marked the end of the scoring, and 
soon I he period ended. 

The cadets were unable to keep pace 
with Cordon ami Coldsmith, who were 
each responsible for the Aggie tallies. 
Marinelli starred for the Army, getting 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 14, 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 14, 1923. 



Athletics 



th»Mi- lonr tally, ami i-n.vii.K tbt fastest 
West Pointer OB the ice. 
The summary : 



MARH. AOIJIK. 

Gordon, lw 

Lamb, rw 
Wlii taker, 
llodsdnii, Id 
(ioldsmith, rd 

Alger, g 



AltMV 

lw, Stevenson 
rw, Caywood 

6, Marinelli 

Id, (ijelslen 

rd, WestphalinKer 

U, lleane 



RELAY TEAM GOES TO 

K. OF C. MEET FRIDAY 



Campus News 



GotJ, - ( ;ord.»n, Marinelli, (ioldsmitl.. 
,.„„„,, Major Harris. Time-three 
15-ininule periods. 

AMHERST TAKES FAST GAME 
FROM AGGIE TUESDAY, 3-1 



Sylvester Stars for Sabrinas While 

Goldsmith makes Lone Score 

for M. A. C. 



PUyiag the |MM what was railed oil 
bMftUM Ol poor ice the week before. 
H„. Aftgte Hockey team took a:i-l de- 
i,. :i t on the Amherst rink Tuesday Feb. 
in a close and well played contest, in 
which their opponents, the ISabrinas, 
outshot them, thontib the play was last 
on both sides. The teams had played 
a tie uame t STO weeks before, and iIiih 
was the ftnl tMue that the South end 
collene had proved itself better than 
tbal that of the North end on the ice 
for several years. 

From the tir.st serable for the puck 
ihegftttewas furiously played. Both 
t( . ;imsW e.eintheirame for blood and 
■food ice helped to make III.- RUM an 
interest!.,;; one from the side-hues. 
Though the 1MB! a.c old rivals, the 
U!l ,ne was characterized hy clean play 
and by the absence of petty squabbles. 
The lirsl period was scoreless, each 
team getting several shots but all being 
well stopped. The second period saw 
three tallies. the lirst by Sylvester..! 
Ai.ihe.st. which was a pretty shol Iron, 
the Wing, after he had received a pretty 
pass hv the Amherst defense. Not 
three.ninu.es later Goldsmith, takiim 
the puck from an Amherst player at his 
position at defense and dribbling down 
the side of the rink took a long shot 
from the left center and easied the puck 
in the comer of the net. It was a 
prettv plav and came unexpectedly, es- 
|l( .,.ially to l.cacraft.who was unable to 
K et in front of it. The third goal Of 
the period was shot by Titus, playing 
cuter for the host sextet. 

In the third period the Antsies were 
unable to g*t the puck by I.eaeraft at 
(0*1, bul Sylvester scored his second 
tally of the name. Iron, then on 
MttMf team could keep the puck loOS 
in its possession and the game ended 
with the score a-l in favor of Amherst. 
Though the score was long-olded for 
Amherst, both teams were on an even 
basis and each showed streaks of bril- 
liant play. 

Sylvester was the Amherst bad man 
and proved a fast ami sure player who 
the IgfftM found hard to keep down. 
,, (li ,lsmi.h and GordOS played good 
hook«7 tor the losers, boll. being m good 
form. The summary I 

M . X.T. AMIIKKHT. 

Lamh.rw lw, Kinsman 

Wl.i«aker,c •••' l """* 

Cordon, lw rw.Syhes.er 

Geld.mllb.rd ld,nllleon 

.,ii ii rd. Pill. nel 

llodsdon, Id '"' 

. , a. Leacryfl 

Alger, g *' * 

, ;i ,a!s Sylvester 2. Titus Coldsn.ith. 
,;„,,.,,.,. Ronton. Time three 12-min- 
ule periods 



Team Takes Second Place Feb. 3 in B 
A. A. Vermont Wins by Inches. 
The Helay team came in second al 
ihe 11. A. A. names, Saturday, Feb. I, 
being bealen by inches by the Vermont 
team. 

(iifford "24, started for M. A. C, and 
Wept second place; Fierce '25 stayed 
lirst through his race, tying with the 
Vermont man who stayed in front all- 
ihrouiih the race; Tisdale '2;$ dropped 
hack to third place, and MacCready '25 
in a splendid linish toiled ahead, tak- 
ing up Id of the 1H yards' lead held by 
Smith of Vermont. 

MacCready won the 1000 yard handi- 
,.av easily. This Friday the same team 
will gO to the K. of games to be held 
in Mechanics Building, Boston. 

Mact ready - 2o will run in eil her the 
800 or the llHHl-yard handicap, and 
BogOI Friend 2:1 will run in the two- 
mile handicap. 



THE CO-ED COLUMN 



FORESTRY COURSE NEEDED 
SAYS AGRI. CONFERENCE 

The committee on forest products of 
the New Kngland Agricultural Con- 
ference recently held in Boston, after 
calling attention to the importance of 
limber as a New England farm crop, 
made the following recommendations 
concerning forestry in agricultural col- 
leges: 

'The raising of woodlot crops has been 
profitable only for the past 26 years. 
This change in conditions has not yet 
brought about corresponding changes 
in 1 he curricula of our agricultural col- 
li ges. The education of our county 
agenls and olher farm specialists has 
been almost wholly tillage lamltraining. 
To correct this anachronism it is recom- 
mended that a joint committee of the 
New England section of the Society of 
American Foresters and the farm man- 
agement specialists of New England 
draws up a statement to be presented 
next year, on the minium requirements 
for teaching forestry in our agricultural 
colleges." 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing;. 



Studlo-MASONM' BI.O(K -Northampton. 

Club Sitfht I>anceH-i><>l>ular with M. A.C. Men. 

Private Lessens by Appointment 

Telephone 761 Northampton 



No. 1 Pocket 
KODAK 



Series II 



Delta I'lii liiimmii is to hold its an- 
nual Valentine dance Saturday, Feb. 
IT, in Memorial Hall. Dancing will 
begin Immediately after the basketball 
name and will continue until 19 o'clock. 
Woodwork's orchestra will furnish the 
music. The chapeiones will be Miss 
Skinner. Professor and Mrs. Hicks, and 

Dean end Mrs. Maeamer. 



East Sunday afternoon from 4-00 until 
tt-00, Mrs. Marsh gave at the Abb J the 
lirst of a series of teas that she is plan- 
ning to hold. Miss Skinner, Miss Ham- 
lin, Miss Orowell, and several of the 
upper class girls and two-year Seniors 
were invited. About 10 were present. 
The lea was a very informal one. 



The Athletic (Tub of Delta l'hi (iam- 
ma is planning to conduct a bike over 
Ml. Toby to the cabin in the near fu- 
ture. The route to be ftdlowed will be 
that taken by Ptot Hicks' parly on its 
Sauirday hikes. 



Mrs. Dimock's class in cooking, com- 
posed of members of the winter school. 

entertained la the cooking laboratory 
at reroald Hall last Monday five mem- 
bers o< the faculty at a very attractive 
luncheon. 



POLISH DAY 

Plans are being prepared for the an- 
nual Pollen Fanners' and Home Makers' 
Day which will be held Tuesday, March 
27. The extension services of the three 
Consentient Valley counties are cooper- 
ating with the Experiment Station and 
the State Extension Service in preparing 
a program of value to the Polish inhabi- 
tants of the district. 

The women's meetings will feature 
meal planning and food preparation. 
The mens meetings will emphasise fer- 
tilizer pi lie lice. 

Direct. .r S. B. Haskell has been prime 
mover in a campaign which now has 
the combined support of agronon.isls 
and fertilizer manufacturors to simplify 
fertilizer brands to nine standard mix 
tures for New England. It is believed 
that the resulting economies will he of 

peat benefit to the oaloa and tobacco 
growers, who use large quantities of 
commercial plant foods. One of the 
Nine Standard formulas is planned par- 
ticularly for use on tobacco. 

Three new Polish-English leaflets are 
to be ready soon, one on fertilizers, one 
on meal planning and one by Benr 
Erhard on club work. 



Picture size 
2 T 4 X3X in. 




This afternoon from 4-4o until 0*8 at 
Abbey the Y. W. 0. A. cabinet is giving 
a tea for its faculty advisors. The ad- 
visors are: Mrs. Hutterlield, Mrs. Hand, 
Mrs. Phelan, Mrs. Chamberlain, Miss 
Skinner, and Miss Hamlin. 

ALUMNI 

HI,— Peter Caseto has given up his 
studies in medicine at Columbia and is 
SI present doing work in lloriculture in 
New York City. 

Hcrvey F. Daw 1022 who has been 
engaged for some time with A. D. Tay- 
lor '06 landscape architect, Cleveland, 
Ohio, will now l.c associated with Flet- 
cher Steele landscape architect, in 
Boston. 

Mr. C. T. Atwood of the Barrett Co. 
addressed the class in Agriculture 77 
Monday morning at X o'clock on the 
.ol. jet of "Nitrogenous Fertilizers." 



Alpha Sigma Phi entertained its 
faculty members last Monday night at 
an informal card party and smoker. 



CARNATION NIGHT BRINGS 
FLOWER SHOW AND TALKS 

The M. A. C. Floriculture Club met 
with the Uolyoke and Northampton 
Florists' and Cardeners" Club in French 
Hall Tuesday night, the occasion being 
"Carnation Night." A carnation com- 
petition was staged by the visiting club, 
the judging of the flowers being done 
by members of the Senior Class in Com- 
mercial Floriculture. 

Short talke wore given by (J. W. Sin- 
clair of Uolyoke, A. B. Butler of North- 
ampton, after which refreshments were 
served. 

The rooms were decorated with 
palms, and a special feature of the 
evening was Ihe music furnished by an 
Informal Orchestra, orgauized and 
directed by Robert Fuller "23. About 
15 of the visiting club were present to 
help make the affair an interesting and 
worthwhile one. 

The next meeting will be held the 
second period Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 
10, in French Hall. The speaker will 
be E. J. Rogean, a salesman in the Bos- 
ton Flower Market, who will speak on 
"Wholesaling Flowers." 



TO make a picture,pull 
down the camera bed 
—the lens instantly 
springs into position — 
look in finder, ancT'ciick" 
the shutter. No focusing. 
And thisquick-action'camera 
can be carried with a few rolls 
of extra film in your coat pocket. 
Instantancousspeedsofl/25, 
1/50 and i/iooof a second, 
bulb and time action, and coun- 
tersunk autographic attach- 
ment. 

Ask to see it at our Kodak 
counter. 

Price $13.50 

Other Autographic Kodaks 
$6.30 up 

DEUEL'S 
Drug Store 



L 



Drury's Bakery 

is the place to buy 

Home Cooked Food 

for all occasions. 
WHEN SPECIALS ARE NEEDEO, CONSULT US 

w. bTdrury 

10 Main Street. 



HOW'S FOR PIPES? 



We have the ones that will suit every smoker. 

YE AGGIE INN 



By the Campus Entrance. 



Wesley Foundation 

AMHERST. 

Student Life Work Bureau 

Personal interviews renardinu service 
as teachers, professors, missionaries, 
rural service, pastors, utir'u-ult uial In- 
slructors, vocational education in home 
and foreign lands. 

F. A. LEITCH 

DIRECTOR 

Collma* Avm. 



Cbompson's Clmelp Calks 

Latest Columbia fox trots which are becoming 

popular are: Kunnmir Wild. St. I.utit* Hluea. 
Htop Your hldilliitf. Greenwich Witch. You 
(lave Me Your Heart and Hurnlnic Hands. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 

PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABKLLK LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, h Pqm 46H-K, P.O. Block 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 




SOPHISTICATED 

You'd be surprised at what 
he knows! He didn't learn 
it all in a book, either. For 
instance— his clothes are 
dreams and his grooming an 
inspiration. 

He pots that finely turned-out 
head from"Vaseline"HairTonic. 
It smooths and jrrooms the hair. 
At all drug stores and student 
barber shops. 

Every "Vase line" product is 
recommended everywhere 
because of its absolute pu- 
rity and effectiveness. 

Vaseline 

HKJ U 1 PAT OFF 

HAIR TONIC 

[Chesebrough Mfg.Co.j 

(consolidated ) 



Academic Activities 

MUSICAL CLUBS ENTERTAIN 
TEACHERS' ASSN AT HAMP 

The combined M. A. C. Musical Clubs 
Have one mure of their series of con- 
certs on Thursday night in the audi- 
torium of the Northampton Ulgb School 
under the auspices of the Northampton 
Teachers' Association. This was one 
of the best concerts of the season. Fine 
spirit and cut husiasm was shown by 
the members of the clubs as well as by 
those who heaid them, and Ihe result 
was apparent in the iiuality of. the per- 
formance. About U0O persons attended. 

The program was the same as that id 
previous concerts, with (he exception 
that the number by the quartet was 
was omitted. "The Sextet from Lucia 
and "old Kinu Cole" brought forth the 
greatest amount of applause, and the 
ti lee Club sang "The HUH Medley" as 
an encoic. 

The College Orchestra played for the 
dancing afterward, which lasted till 18. 
The tine acrosi i« properties of the aud- 
itorium helped greatly in making the 
concert a success. 



Faculty 



COMPETITION STILL ON 

FOR VARSITY DEBATING 

Competition is now open for positions 
on the debating learn for ihe next de- 
hate. Members of all classes are eligi- 
ble, and any interested should see the 
manager, Sandow '2:5, at once. One 
academic ciedii is given lot each speak- 
ing pari in each debaie. 

The subject for the next debate is: 
Resolved: That the United Slates recog- 
nize the Soviet Covcrimient in Kussia. 
Competition will be held immediately 
after assembly today. Those competing 
will be expected logivea live-minute 
talk on some phase of this question. 



DIRECTOR WILLARD TO BE 
AT FORESTRY CONFERENCE 

Director Willard of the Extension Ser- 
vice is to take part in an Important con- 
ference on forestry which will be held 
at the Hotel Taft in New Haven, ('..1111.. 
Feb. 21-24. The directors of extension 
service in the Northeastern States and 
the Society of American Foresters au- 
to confer together as to means of carry- 
ing out practical projects for the dem- 
onstration of woodlot management, 
reforest rat ion, forest improvement, plant- 
ing*, of white pine, etc. 

Attention has been drawn to the 
importance of the timber crop to V I. 
farming by the report ot (before*! prod- 
ucts committee ot ihe recent New Eng- 
land agricultural conference which de- 
clared that at least one-third of the 
average N. B. farm should he pn.duc- 
ing timber crops, and that a large part 
of the land is better tilted for timber 
than anything else. 



FACULTY NOTES 

Mrs. Kenyoti L Unttertield gave a tea 
at "Hillside" last Saturday afternoon 
from four o'clock until six. The women 
students of the College and sevcial fac- 
ulty meinbeis were present. Mm. Mil- 
lard, Mrs Merrick, Mrs. Hamilton, and 
Mr*. Maclimer poured lea and chocolate 
for Ihe guests. About forty were 
present. 



President Batterneid spoke in Boston 

hist Tuesday evening before Ihe Boston 
Market Hardener's Association. H. F. 
Tompson of the Market Garden Field 
Station and Commissioner Gilbert '04 
were also on the program. 



Mr. Watts was recently elected seclc 
taryolthc Associaton ol Itiisiness OHi- 

eers of U.K. Educational institutions. 

A special diploma, will be given by 
Professor Phelan to the students in Prof. 
Jodklns' Ice (ream School. Ii reads lo 
this Sffeet: "This introduces Mi. 
, who is a graduate of the 



Ice cream GollofrOi Whatsvs? is knows 

he knows il. Whal he doesn't know 
isn't knowledge. " 



I)r Cance addressed the meeting ot 

the New England Association ol Mar 

beting Oflicials, which was held in {'•i>- 
Imi last week, on the subject . "Can the 
cooperative orgain/.al ion raise the price 

level 10 the farmers?" This meeting 

was held jointly with the Economic lb 
search Council of New Kngland. 



AG. EC. NOTICE 

The men taking courses in agiicul- 
tural economics are being asked to at- 
tend the lecture to be given by Profl - 
sol Wanning. Pro f ess o r Ot Statistics 

and Economies of the University of 

Copenhagen, on coo peral hii and agri- 
cultural conditions la Denmark. This 
leetuie will be given OS Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 2UI h at four o'clock i n the liter* 
noon in Ihe auditorium of Stockbridge 

Hall. All members of tbs student 

body. Ihe Faculty, and t he publicgcio 1 
ally are invited to t bis lecture. 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DATE 

A definite date for the Mid-Winter 
Alumni Hay has been decided upon. 
Hereafter. Alumni l»ay will come the 
first Friday in February of each year. 



NOTICES 

Dean Bea b e of Boston University, the 

speaker for next Sunday's Obapcl, 
Fell. 1M, will also be tbs ipesbsi 

special union meeting of the Conjjn- 

gational. Baptist, Methodist and Un- 
itarian Cburebes and the two collt. 
The faculty of both Colleges are also 
included in this invitation from ihe 
churches. The meeting will beheld 

in the First Congregational (hutch, 

Amherst, on .Sunday evening al 7-00. 

This meet I eg Ii especially fot tbs 

students who are cordiallly Invited to 
attend. 



Professor Patterson will read 'Ham- 
let in the A udiiorium, Bto cbb rtd gs 

Ball, tonight at 6-30. All student! are 
welcome, 



-*a^jfc__^£ 




-IKr 



The college man who sacri- 
fices quality! tkatei on thin ice. 

Poor clothes, for example, go 
through in DO time. 

Pays to buy the best — our sort. 

Not necessarily expensive, 
either. 

Hall orders filled. 

Rogkks Pkkt Company 

Broadway Berald Square 

at IStb si "Four at 8fith St 

I 'onveuif lit 
Hroadway Coiners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren al 41st St. 

NFW VOKK CITV 



"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other seed thine* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel 41,'. W llailley. Mm 

FINAL TRY-OUT 

Ossm in ;oid try row keys between see a. m.. 

Dee. -nil. mid - M p, ■., Dae. M 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

Thm Rex mil Start* 



The Colonial Inn 

BOARDERS, 

Weekly or Transient. 
CATERING to Auto 

Parties by Appointment 

Opi;n under new management. 

I'. I). HOM.WS, 

Prop, 

Tel. 489 \V 

T. S. PEKINS 

Suit* made to order • $35.00 lo $45.00 

Rnlncomt* 
Baits Presses' ft Military laHerlas 



OVKK AKAMS' OKI < BT< <\;\. 






TheJ^churett^^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 14, W23. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOABD OK KDITOKS. 

l„viM.i W. B*AM » Managing Bdltor 

|,i -niKH B. aWWIM ■ Managua 

DK.i-.uaMKNi H i \i>s: 

[BVIMO W. Si M» '-' :! 
AM.K.itr B. W won '24 
I., wis II. Ki nil "-'■' 

Li mi k B. UiarwoTO* •» 

GRORO* I- ri " '•' " '-•'' 
JUHM O. B.*n "-' 

KM! IV I i. SMI I II "-'•"' 

KiMii M. Wooo '-'> 

JOHN M. WlllTTIltll'28 



i m ...»m .p-a"., ? . ^^'JS'Jffl^ 



.„•„,„ Vl ., both methods have the same 
(M1(1 i„'view. |i is mainly a question as 

to whether time Ib won Important than 

self-reliant character and democratic 

ettlsentbip fostered by U»eoJ eoottol. 



Editorial. 

Atl>l»"lt<*- 

Acaileiiii> I. 

Aloiiinl. 

Campus. 



Facility. 
Two-Vi-iir. 

■xcnaaee ea* ,. .,.,,.„„ i„ "x, 



HraisKSB Department. 
«■ ■•« .»* • ■ Business Manager 

SIB""'. • HT;"..r-,4 Adv.HU.ng Manager 
i R..n« -21 Circulation Manager 

D..NA..I. w. Lewis » " AN, !., r 

(ill.llK.HT .1. II A l SHI KU -'.» 



Subscription B2.00 per year. Single 
conies 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The M.ssachusett. Collegian. 

In cane of change of address, sub- 
.oribers will .lease notify the bus.ness 
manager as soon an possible. 

UMlillNMMW matter at the Amherst 
P„. Office. A.e.ae,, for «lll». • ^ 
nU „f IM >„ tI ,ge „...vi.»e.l for In Met Ion 110* Act 
2 October. 1917 authorized August 20. WIS. 



Future Education. 
Shall tb*«tBte»e©BthMW to maintain 
an(l be MipOMlbto for the public 

s ,| Isofihecouniry.' This qaeetlon 

Ubroiwhtapwltb theBlerllnrTowiier 

BUI 11 tool «*•*< importance to 801- 
|, sand universities inasmuch as 11 

seeks to better tbe edacational faci.- 
„ M -it. more eo»pleto prepo«tloa ... 

th e7unda.nentals of entrance COOdi- 
rtoB- and it successful Would un- 
(i „ u , ( „. (Uv increase the number ot StU- 

dM „ seeking to lata admittance. 

S„,.l. a result would add great ly to tbe 
problem of overerotrdioitia eolle«ee In 

'few years. From nucha siandpou.t 
'„„. Sterling Towner Hill would be a d.s- 
tilu ., asset .o.hecoun..y,bnl i. would 
, u . ul tll( , eX1 ,,,.MM,t saciitice of charac- 
ter and eltleenablp. 

Tb « control of tbe schools would 
, 1( „.,ssarily go lata .he hands of the 
Federal government leaving out of eon- 

.Idetatloatbe loltlatlw ol the poople 

-bleb Woald He idle in this respect. 
Cons.an. practice in local self govem- 
me ,,i is vital. The succeeding genera- 
„„„« will lose interest in a critical sub- 
ject which is of utmost importance to 
Self help is the foundation of 



Ten Day Short Course in 

Ice Cream Making Held Here 
mm Laboratory has been an unus- 
uallv busy place for the paattWO weeks. 
,hc occasion being the lirst annual ten- 
daj si. oil eon.se in ice clean, making. 
A. total of In were enrolled, ihrec- 
,,„„, |,s of then, being ice cream manu- 
facturers or supply men serving the le. 
cream industry. The men were kepi 
bnt , fern HA. H.to6l\ M..one labora- 
tory exercise and one lecture being la 
„„,',.,- each forenoon and afternoon. 
tmoegel the material covered were *a- 
rioUl .ests for materials used in iee 
,,,;,„,, standardizing ice cream mixes, 
,| M . •fleet of fat content, percent of 
swell, gelatin and improvers, and use 
,,t varying ,,ualitie8 of butter in the nux 
()ll , he quality of the finished ice cream. 
On Friday, Feb. 0, lb. hist educa- 
Uonal ice cream scoring ever held ... the 
Kast was held as a part of thecou.se. 
Thirty sitmplei from manufacturers all 
over the state were entered for scoring. 
After being scored by the judging com- 
mittee consist log of Professor Fisher of 
Connecticut Agricultural College, Pro- 
[CMM .ludkins of M. A. C. and Mr. 
Wheeler of the Producers' Dairy Co«»- 
p, B y, Hrocklon, the manufacturers 
placed their scores on tbfl samplee. 
The samples were then scored by 18 M. 
\ C faculty men and women toget tbe 
Consumers' point of view. The results 
| i;i ve not as yet been tabulated. Tbej 
will show a great need of slandardi/.a- 
Uon in this important industry as the 
samples showed large differences ... 
body, flavor and color. These scorings 
will' prove verv helpful to the industry. 
\ banquet and round table discussion 
was held a. Draper Hall Friday night 
a! which some of the biggest problems 
confronting tb« industry were dis- 
cussed. Judging by the enthusiasm 



all contracts had been fulfilled . but due 
to the iallUW Ol so many to settle then 
obligations the change has been post- 
pOMd indefinitely and the Alum... Sec- 
retary forced to struggle along with in- 
adequate funds. 

The whole trouble can be traced to 
t ,,e earelessnessontheparl of younger 
alumni who were generous enough in 
their contributions but who have not 
taken the payment of their pledges as a 
Berious affair. They have placed other 
needs ahead of their pledge and as a 
result the other things have taken 
priority and the pledge remained un- 
paid Stories are not uncommon of the 
Older alumni who have subscribed un- 
H.in.inglv and .hen have had to pinch 
ibeirlBCoaaaod really bend under the 
burden, in order to contribute to a 
worthy cause. The younger altimn. in 
a great many cases have not even felt it 
necessary to rotOfO their dances and 
U„od times for the sake of settling up. 
If only the seriousness of the situation 
( ,. ul , u . im prcssed on those delinquent 
( ,,„ ui „utors then the whole det.c.t 
would he crossed off the books and the 
difficulty settled, but until a true under- 
hand, ng and the need of a priority pay- 
men, is realized there is little hope of 
success. Ojiick, prompt action is urg- 
ently required. If it is necessary to 
•crimp, if i' IB possible to write a check, 
then do so. Above all make some pro- 
vision for payment in the near future. 



athletics committee, unpaid advisory 
coach, to athletic director. And now 
when Walter Camp wants to slip a new 
rule over on Harvard he has to ask 
Mike. Anyone who knows them both 
will promptly shout, "'Leave it to 

Mike!" 

Fkask A. Wauoh. 



B10GRAPHS 



President Kenyon L. Butterfield. 
President Kenyon Leech Buttertield 
was born at Lapeer, Mich, in 1MB. H>8 
father was one of the leading farmers 
„f .he state, secretary of the State Board 
of Sericulture, secretary of the Michi- 
gan Agricultural Society, and a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College, it was only natural 
that the son should seek his education 
at the institution with which his father 
had been so closely connected. He was 
graduated B. S. in 1891 with high hon- 
ors and even then showed great prom- 
ise in the special studies in which be 
has since distinguished himself, sociol- 
ogy and economics. Following his 
graduation be did valuable work for 
the college, being in turn assistant sec- 
retary, editor of the Grange Visitor, tbe 
organ of the Michigan State Grange, 
and superintendent of Farmers' Inst.- 
tutes. His experience as an editor un- 
doubtedly fixed and confirmed his lit- 
erary style which is one of unusual 
clearness and charm. 

He returned to his college for gradu- 
ate work and in 1902 he received hi. 
Master's degree. He was at once made 
an instructor in Rural Sociology in 
which position be remained until be 
was called to the presidency of the 



A Distinguished Alumnus. 

So far as I have seen the Cou.koias 
has given no adequate notice to a sub- 
stantial distinction earned by an alum- 

I1I1S ,M.F. Ahearn '04. MtJ*M Uuode lslan d State College, 
is all the more inexplicable and IBM | ^ waB unanirao 

disable since tbe distinction I.es pre- 
eiselv in the field of athletics, which is 

this journal's special province. 

M F \hearn, who is director of ath- 
letics at the Kansas State Agricultural 

College, has recently been appointed to 

the football rules committee of the 

National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 

iion of America, the body which makes 



among the students two or 
courses will be necessary another win- 
ter to take care of the crowd. 



n ; ,,U8,a T footl.all rules to govern all the col- 
three such n,el _„.i ,i.^„<rf, them. 



1UUC »■>•»"" ~ 

In 1906 be was unanimously elected 
to tbe presidency of this college. His 
inauguration which took place Oct. 17, 
1906 was the first public inauguration 
of a president of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College and was attended by 
leading educators from all over New 
Fngland. President Butterfield came 
into the presidency when tbe college 
was entering upon a period of rapid 
growth and with great opportunities 



A Prior Lie on Your Thoughts. 

It is to be regretted lhat so large an 
..mount of Memorial lluilding pledges 
remain unpaid at the present lime, it 
represents a condition which can only 
he remedied by the closest attention to 
the matter by all those concerned, and 
the real effort on the part of those who 
have failed to comply with tbe condi- 
tions laid down in the pledge. Forty- 



leges in tbe country, and through them 

nil contrihutary highscbools and sand- 

j'l itl the whole U.S. A. (United 

States of Athletics.) Other members of 

this weighty committee are E. K. Hall, 

Dartmouth. Walter Camp. \ale, J A. 
Babbitt, Haverford, F.W.Moore Har- 
vard W. W. Uoper, Princeton. 1 aul I. 
liashiel, U. S. Naval Academy Carl 
Williams University of Pennsylvania, _ — ___ __ 

c w savage, oberiin, a. l. » mith ; frown Hall, Amherst 

California and D. K. Bible, Texas A&" 



KIIM 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 

140 Main Street, Northimpton, Miss. 



2«f^^£2. TS ..oat we^ed wi... by tbel.domr.ol the 

individual «loes for tun _ U! ..i. -..«, n.rp^arv to make the 



m. college. llWedn'day 

Thus it will be seen that Ahearn . I _^ 
even vote with the celebrated I 
ioo.H.'ousand dollars is no small sum , to I ^^« ^^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ a ||Thursday 



culab le greater help to bltn, than hat 

wh leb comes like a bird on w.ngs 

ushered in by someone else. 

Kurthermoie. education is not more 

Vital tOtb« national government .ban 
,„ state and local units. The commu- 
nity suffers from poor leadership and 
education as much as.be larger unite. 
The eonotrj la made op of a mnlti nde 

of communities whose welfare 
i8 neeessarv for the welfare of tbe 



whole. The r.-en. system has n 

btokaadowe in tbe emaJUroupa. Cbi 

DM , decade has shown an improve- 
^...tno, paralleled in any previous 
tiu.e There is DO reason to suspect 

that tbto Improvement will aot con- 

Iiluie The community il awaken. ng 

tot belateneUjofiti need, and going 

. V head with its n-sponsibilities with a. 



ote which was necessary 10 make the 
Memorial Building a reality. The in- 
terest alone on this amount is of suffi- 
cient si/.elo eat up a great deal of the 
money which should be used to carry 
on the Alumni work, planned through 
the alumni office. If serious action is 
no. taken soon tbe whole twelve thou- 
sand dollars extra will be eaten up by 
interest charge., when it could very 
well hat. been used to furnish the first 
floor rooms of the the building in ««** 

tion. 

To give the interior an aspect of com- 
fort and prosperity, a large amount of 
equipment and furniture must be pro- 
vided. It cannot be installed with any 
degree (d satisfaction until the princi- 
ple is paid off and the finances put on a 
.manent foundation. The Alumni Of- 



Kr^ST5SS=.=.K"=S-- - — " — "I 



\\ ai in \>i."» r » .. 

younger and better man. representing a 
in ore important institution in a more 
influential portion of the country, it ,s 
e ,sy to see who rules the football rules 
'•Mike- is well remembered by every 
um ." ilt aggie who has a memory 20 
years old, and those of us who viewed 
fhe game from the sidelines will assert 
that he is also well remembered at Am- 
herst bv the players of 1903. From the 
beginning "Mike" has earned his way, 
first through highschool, then four 
years at Aggie, where, besides earning 
bis board he earned every athletic hon- 
or there was to bestow. Soon after 
graduation he went to the Kansas Agri- 
cultural College, where he again began 
al the bottom as a member of tbe facul- 
ty From this position of toil and ob- 
scurity he rose by sheer merit and bard 

work through all the grades of faculty 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6.45. 8-30 

Friday 



Mat 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3. Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Two Day*. Thursday Pries* 

Rex Ingram's production of 

Anthony "ofle'&^.mVcoil- 
mantlc story "THE FBISOn- 
ER OF ZENDA." 10 reels. 
with Alice Tsjry, Uwif 
Stone. Rsmon Navarro and 
Roht. Edesoa. 

Fox Mows 

Alice Brady. Bobt. Ellis. 
David Fowoll and BiU Maldl 
" "ANNA ASCENDS." from 
the stage play In which she 
scored tier biggest stage suc- 
cess. _ , 

Sport Review 

Clyde CooB In-Lasy ■•— " 

Clyde Fitch's famous comedy 
I stage success! Hary miei 
Hlnter andTom MfJj™ »i! 
"THE COWBOY AND THE. 
LADY." A Western romance 
that's got 'em all stopped for 
real laughs and thrills. 
Faths News 

Larry Semon in 

■" "School Days" 



Monday 

Mat. 3. Kve, 
6.45, 8-30 



Wallace Reid. Lila Los ami 

Walter Hiors in 
"THE GHOST BBEAKER" 

Fatho Review 
"Blazes." 2-reel Mermaid 



YOUR CLOTHING PROBLEM IS 

to buy clothes with individuality, with fine workmanship— at a price you think fair to pay. It's a 
real problem-HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES are the solution. 

HICKEY-FREEMAN CLOTHES are customized. They show hand-workmanship of the most ex- 
pert kind wherever it contributes to the style, the drape, the lasting good looks of the garment. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 



The Profit in Quality 

Creamerymen, Cheesemakers and 
Dairymen operate their plants for one 
purpose only— to make and accumulate 
profits. 

They realize too, thai only by pro- 
ducing the highest quality milk foods 
at the lowest possible production cost, 
can tbeir margin of protit be increased. 

Nothing is proving more successful in 
the effort to attain these results than 
the rapidly increasing use of 



C/eaner 



j/id Cleanses" 



This pure, inorganic, greaseless clean- 
er is so pure and purifying, and cleans 
clean with so little effort, that its elli- 
ciency has long been established in the 
Dairy indusiy. lis use insures against 
uncleanliness, had odors and other 
causes of deterioration and loss of qual- 
ity in milk products. 

Moreover, its absolute uniform qual- 
ity, dependable work, free rinsing prop- 
erties aud harmless nature, all eon- 
tribute toan unusually lowcleaningcost. 

Indian In 
circle 



Ask your supply man. 



in every 
package 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prices. 
Mmrmmlm m Mpmolmlt* 

VI Ho. Prospect St.. Amherst. Mass 

Tml. BBB-M 




_I 



After Every Meal 



WMGLEYS 



Chew .your food 
well, then use 
WRIGLEY'S to 
aid digestion. 

It also keeps 
the teeth clean, 
breath sweet, 
appetite keen. 

The Crmat American 

Sweetmeat 



D-9i 

Save the I 
Wrappers 




BETTER 

DIGESTION 



for service in Ihecause of education and 
rural betterment. 

lie is possessed with administrative 
qualilivcs of Ihe highest order. His 
annual budget for (he Legislature re- 
quires most careful preparation and pre- 
sentation. His remarkable earnestness 
and sincerity and entire frankness in 
dealing with this hod" have won him 
the confidence of the men at the Slate 
House. During his administration he 
has secured such buildings as (lark 
Hall in 190V, French Hall 1008, Ranald 
Hall l'.Hti, .Mockhridge Hall 1U15. lie- 
cause of his tine work he was called by 
President Koosevell in lifOH to a position 
<ui the Country Life Commission, 
towards the work of which he has con- 
tributed much* Again in 1919 he was 
called upon to be of national service in 
seiving on the I'niied Mates Agricul- 
tural Commission to Kurope. 

President Hutierliebl served as chair- 
man of the Massachusetts Food I'uni- 
uiillee, as a member of tbe advisors 
committee of the Food Administrator of 
Massachusetts, as a member of the edu- 
cational committee of the Council of 
National Defense, as a member of the 
International War Work Council of 
tbe Y. M. C. A., and tin ally, in (he sum- 
mer of 1918, was asked to go to France 
as a member of the Army Overseas Kd- 
ueation Commission, to take charge <>l 
tbe vocational educational work among 
American soldiers. He sailed for Frame 
Nov. 90, 1918 .ad upon his arrival there 
began the organization ol an immense 
educational enterprise. 

In April the army took over I his edu- 
cational work and designated the mem- 
bers of Ihe groups who had gone over- 
seas to teach as Ihe Army Kdneatlo.al 
Corps. President Hutterfield gave the 
larger part of his time to the agricul- 
tural phase of education, and several 
interesting enterprises were developed. 

President Hutterfield was also <>i l 

the I'nited States delegates to study 
agricultural conditions in China, on tbe 
delegation which visited that country 
last year. Thus far the administration 
of President Hutterfield has been a not- 
able success and the future prospects of 
M. A. C. brighten under his faithful 
guidance. 



Old Dcerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfielu. Mam 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

— DSALSM IN — 

DRV AND FAISJCV GOODS 



When Adam felt the need of replenishing 
his wardrobe, he turned over a new leaf. 
Aggie men know a better way. They go to 

CARL. H. BOLTER 

correct MENS OUTFITTER -exclusive 

Kuppcnheimcr (iood ( 'lollies 



ISettleton Shoes Stetson Hats 

Furnishings 









COMMUNICATION 

TO TUK EniTOlt OF TIIK Col.l.KGI AN : 

Dear Sir: 

The Annual Orowl. 

The Otd i'linmr's Ahmnnir frequent- 
ly bears tbe following insert opposite a 
spring date, "About this lime expect 
rain.'' An M. A. C. almanac might 
well bear opposite the month of Febru- 
ary this inscription. "About this time 
expect tbe annual growl." Synchro- 
nized with tbe appearance of tbe 
ground hog, Ibis strange phenomenon 
of college life appears annually about 
the middle of tbe winter term. Hlame 
the climate or whatever else you will, 
each year we wax wrathful and burl at 
the faculty one demand, "Less work !" 
Cold weather seems lo inspire our pro- 
fessors with great zeal to make the 
long-suffering students get closer to the 
grindstone, so there often is some justi- 
fication for the complaint, There often 
develops a pretty race between instruc- 
tor and student to determine whether 



Safety Razor and Blades Given Away 



With Men's Shoes from $5.00 up. 
Sec them in our window 



IS 



hoe 



tore 



We have now what Amherst has needed for so many 
years. In our 

LUNCHEONETTE 

you will find a full line of specials such as you 
will in any city restaurant. 






You can get dinner and supper every day 
in the week at very reasonable prices. 



College Candy Kitchen 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 14, 1»23. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 14, 1923. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

$1.10 by mall. 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC, NORTHAMPTON 



Thurs.. Frl. and 
Sat.. 

Keb. \li. 16. 1? 



Wed.,Thur8.. Krt. 
and Sat. . 

Feb.21,W.aM 



RICHARD BARTHELMESS 

Christie Comedy Fox we w e "'"' . 

~ "THE OLD ThOMESTEAD " 

wttli an Ail-Star < ;int lncludinic »__„_»« 

With an A ^,; eodor . g.berti and GeorKe Fawcett. 




LAUNDRY 



Present Prices: 

White Cases 
Tan Cases 
Inner Cases 
Labels per dozen 

Laundry Bags 



$150 

$1.75 

.35 

.15 

50 



Spring Mallory Hats are here 
F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 




Opportunities For 

SUMMER WORK 

Now available 1»> 

THE NATIONAL SURVEY 



Lithographic Works 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Topographical Offices 
Cb«St«r, Vermont 



Western Sales Office 
Cleveland, Ohio 



For particulars see 

SAMUEL CUTLER '26, 75 Pleasant St. 



flex's Lunch Room 

Formerly of the Candy Kitchen. 
OVER BOLLES' SHOE STORE 

SPFCIAL NOON-DAY DINNERS AT 50c-Food and Service of Highest 

Quau!; -Th! Tees! Coffee in Town-Buy a * 5 5 ° ■" '^ < or * 500 

Hours, 7 a. m. to 12-00 i». m. 
The place that made good over nigh,-- Come up ao d bring your friend," 



or not the former can correct quizzes as 
fast as the latter can write them, and at 
times the student wins. But before we 
pew! ourselves hoarse over inflicted 
wroofft, whether real or imaginary, 
let's consider a few things pertaining to 
this question of scholastic work. 

We are supposed to work a ceitain 
number of hours a week according to 
the letter of the law. Twenty credits 
demands about tifly hours of work a 
week all told. That means fifty of real 
effort. Balancing all courses "guts" 
and others, do we exeed that require- 
ment I 

As students, pardon the insinuation 
that we are here to study, how many 
hours ought we to put in at our college 
work out of those the Lord allots us 
each and all'.' In the first place we must 
develop and increase our capacity for 
work. We can never do that if we 
undertake no more than we are certain 
we can do. It is only by working un- 
der pressure that we increase our 

power Agate, i< ta « i ,<mr ,,,an ,hat 

leaves his pick in midair when the 
,]„ck strikes twelve. We claim to be 
more or less interested hi gaining an 
education, so let's not be particular 
al.otit an extra hour now and then. A 
little pressure will increase our knowl- 
edge, and we want those two things. 

How do we work during those long 
w.ary hours which we claim to use 
Studying! Spending hours over a 
book w ; lh a mind oscillating between 
the pe«ea and extraneous matters is 
not studying. 

After ruminatinii over the above 
,,oints, BDBeldei the second phase of 
the prohlem. If we work twenty hours 
a week at some joh thai it is necessary 
to hold in order that we may eat and 
sleep comfortably, and if we give ten 
hours a week to some activity in order 
that we may enjoy to (he full this col- 
lege life, we must expect to be pressed 
for time. We are here to study, and 
we ought t» think of that before we 
let a hundred other things of more or 
less inipo nance occupy our time. 

If any misguided faculty member 
ventilates his assignments on the basis 
that his course is the only one on 
the campus that is not a snap, lets in- 
form him of his error. Nevertheless, 
the fact that this growl of ours comes 
annually at a certain period of the year 
ought to make us think it over a hit. 
Koc.Eit B. FuiK.Ni> IMS. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 

Good work speaks for itsel.. 



IN THE 

MEMORIAL. BUILDING 



A. MIENTKA 

Alio* RmpmMng Whllm U WmH 



the; new college store 

New stock Stationery tor girls worth from 65c to 95c 

Still a whole lot near beer wholesale if you can drink the stuff 

Tooth Paste, Shoe Polish and Shaving Cream 

T. T. AHELE '23, Manager M. M. RICHARDSON '23 H. E. WEATHERWAX '24 W. DIMOCK '24 



12.50 

$1.75 

S2.25 
1.3 



SKW I'KK'KS 
Men's Whole Soles. Kubber Heels . 
Mens Half Soles, Kubber Heels . 
Men's Kubber Holes. Kubber Heel* . 

Men's Half Holes •*"" 

Work (Juaranteed-AMHKKST HOl'BK 

Amherst Fruit Store 

ICE CREAM, SODA AND BOTTLED TONIC 

Ciicars M»dC!e»rett« Hi.,-. :1s. priM per carton 

mi Cigarettes. 

Schrafft'B Chocolates and other leadlnu lines. 

Cracker* and Canned Good* 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Wetch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 



13 Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass. 

NOVICK & SOGKUT 

Custom Tailors 



11 PHOENIX" SILK STOCKIHGS I clMning » Pressing - Re P airin & and ■A 



Are 1'ronilnent AsftBBSJ the 

■tosses* Make* w«- PeateM 

THE SEMI-FASHIONED PHOENIX STOCKING 
At $1.55 

le a itooil value for women who want the best 

there Is In a seamless stocking that yet 

will lit the ankles trimly. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



Expert Military Tailoring 

Pressing. Cleaning and Repairing 

Dry Cleaning and Dyeing 

Huyyour pressing ticket from H.Uanizue'Bl 

fULL D1ESS SUITS and TUXEDOS and all the 

necessary fixings. TO RENT or FQE SALE 

Hornm Brom. Nackwmmr 

Order your nexl Suit or Overcoat here now. 
Bent selections of Woolens In the latest pat 
{ernsalwayHon hand. The high „ualtty ■« 'our 
work is apparent on fancy garments Try us. 

LABROVITZ 

Tailer and Haberdasher. 

11 Amity St. .Next to Western Union Tel. Office 



1924 AND 1923 

Aggie Stationery 

39c per box 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 




Quality Footwear 

We have just completed our twenty-fifth year in the shoe business 
and have established a standard of quality of our own. This stand- 
ard has come to be recognized by our customers and it is a tangible, 
visible, good-will asset that has shown itself in the steady growth 
of our business 

While it is our constant aim to sell footwear at lower prices, it 
will not be done at the expense of our standard of quality. 

Yours for Good Footwear, 

E. M. BOLLES 



FULLER '23 ORGANIZES 

NEW MUSICAL SCHOOL 



Amherst 



Mass 



Instruction for all Students— Orches- 
tra and Individual work. 

Hob Fullei has started a school for 
nn.Nieians which has much premise of 
beinu very successful, Tue members 
receive free instruction in instrumental 
work botl. individually and as a member 
of an orchestra. The orchestra is led by 
Prof. Davis of ihcl.otanydept, who was 
at o'ie time baud leader at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

It is open to both men and women 
students, already including women 
clarinet and violin players. There are 
no icbaiaraalp restrictions on this club, 
which will open it to some ineligible 
for other musical activities. These in- 
structions provide better chances for in- 
dividual development than the other 
musical clubs and that is one of the 
aims of the organization. 

Rehearsals are held on Sunday after- 
noons and the time has been changed 
from 2 -M to :V00. If sufficient interest 
is manifested there isstroug probability 
of a spring concert and other activities, 



The Largest and Best Assortment 



— OF — 



College Footwear 

in Western Massachusetts 
and AT LOW PRICES 

Stockings to Match 
THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

273-279 High St., Hoi) •** 

Tml. 1082-1088 

sing lee: 



Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.00 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



1 9 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



Memorial Hall 

Barber Shop Hoars: 

Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday. Thurs- 
day, Saturday. 8-00 A. M. to 6.00 P. M. 
Friday, 8-00 A. M. to 9-00 P. M. 

Try a Cocoanut Oil Shampoo for 
your head's sake. 

HAIR BOBBING 



H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

IT'SAIpPY FEELING , ISN'T IT, 

To know that your shoes have been 
repaired, and repaired right ? 

We depend upon satisfied cus- 
tomers for our success. 



Work is done by the GOODYEAR 
WELT Shoe Repairing System. 

V. GRANDONICO, Prop., 

II 1-2 Amity St. 



Amherst Book Store 



siAimm 



?M 



^Ammmm 



.t k t-^ 



Short Courses 



TWO-YEAR LOSES TO SACRED 
HEART AND WILBRAHAM 

Sacred Heart High of Holyoke de- 
feated the Two-Year basket ball team 

here last Tuesday, l»y a seme of 8] (0 7. 
For the visitors, l.urke s Hour work, 
a. id Robtfts' foul BBOOtieg were promin- 
ent. Stover shot the only lielil foal for 
the Two- Year team. 
Su miliary : 

SACBKD II KAICI'. 





it. 


K. 


i'. 


Barks, 1 1 


:. 





10 


Roberts, If 


I 


LI 


II 


Kane. <• 


1 





1 


Reynolds, r« 


2 


u 


4 


Kennedy. Ig 








(l 


C. Kane, In 





11 







Hi 


12 


:«2 


TWO 


raaa. 






Stover, if 


1 


u 


2 


Mcicliant, If 





r> 


B 


Parsons, c 


(i 





u 


Barnicle, ru 











Tufts. Ig 








11 




1 


I 


7 


Referee — Ball. 









The Two-Tear basketball team was 
defeated last Friday afternoon in the 
Drill Hall hy Wilhraham, 10 to 15. 
Merchant was blffb scorer with nine 
points to his credit, while Farnsworth 
and COBOingham of the visitors 
gathered 10 and i:> points each. 

Merchant, Barnicle and Parsons 
played the entire name, with Tults, 
Mover, l'ark. Cutler and Burnett al- 
leraatlaej at right forward and leit 
guard. 



TWO-YEAR CLUBS HOLD 

COMBINED DANCE FEB. 10 

About 46 couples attended the Two- 
Year Inter-('lul> dance held last Satur- 
day evening from eiyht to eleven in the 
Memorial Building. Professor and Mrs. 
Phelan and Professor and Mrs. ,lud- 
kins chaperoned the party, and the 

music was famished by w*ood worth's 
orchestra. 



SHORT COURSE NOTES 

2-yr. '21. — William S. Fisher, has ac- 
cepted the position of herd manager for 
Winthrop Crane Jr., I'nkamel Farm. 
Pitlslield. He is a graduate of the 
Norfolk County Atiricullural School, 
and look the Two-year course in one 

year. H« has been very successful 

since IsftVlOg M. A C. and his present 
position is one ot great responsibility. 

SATURDAY MORNING HIKE 

AGAIN SUCCESSFUL 

Saturday morning, Feh. 10, though it 

started in with a fairly heavy snowfall, 
Just received a new j Maw i> r „f nicks, "I<<"'" Walker of the 

Experiment station Btal and Church. 
Ward and Woodbury of II <>" the 
rabbit atol deer tracked trails of Mt. 
Toby. It turned out to be a tine hik- 
ing day after the snow, not a cloud in 
the sky by noon, and the trip was 
negotiated with plenty of enthusiasm. 



Single Sheet Box of M. A. C. Seal 
Paoer, called "The Dyplomatic." 

See our window. 



C. F. DYER 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Hall, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

Academic Activities, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Assoc iation, 

Track Association, 

The ( 'ollegian, 

Hockey Assoc iation, 

Basketball Assoc iation, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 
Richard Mellen, Manager 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 
Frank P. Rand, Manager 136 R 
Roger H. Ftiend, President 720 

Perry G. Bartlett, Manager 8325 
Farl S. Carpenter, Manager 59- M 
Charles W. Steele, Manager 8325 
Irving W. Slade, Kditor 
Krnest T. Putnam, Manager 
Philip B. Dowden, Manager 
(ii'stav Litulskog, Manager 
Trescott T. Abele, Fditor 



170 
8330 
833<> 

53o 
861-W 



Thomas L. Snow, Manager 



720 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, Owen E. Folsom, Mviager 8314 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-four Index, Richard B. Smith, Manager 8314 
M. A.. C. Christian Association, Harold I). Stevenson, President 720 

Public Speaking and Debating, Alexander Sandow, Manager 



Saving of 2b% to 40% on 

Boots, Shoes and Rubbers 

If you are in need of any kind of Footwear or Hosiery just come 
into our store and ask us to show you whatever you may be 
interested in. If you don't think that you will save from 
25 to 40 per cent., we don't want you to buy any- 
thing, because we are doinp; business on this 
basis. U. S. Rubbers $1.25 per pair. 
We also do high grade 

SHOE REPAIRING 

On the basis that you must be satisfied or your shoes will be 
resoled without any extra charge. Our prices are as 

follows : 

Men's whole leather soles with rubber heels, sewed, $2.25 

Men's whole Neolin soles with rubber heels, sewed, 1.90 

Men's half soles with rubber heels, sewed, - - 1.70 

Rubber heels of any kind, 50 cts per pair. 

We will sew soles if your shoes are Goodyear welt. 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING COMPANY 

CAMPION BLOCK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 

Everything in Hardware and Kitchen Goods 

Plumbing and Heating 



THE MUTUAL PLDHBIN6 & HEATING GO. 

The Winchester Store 






■ M 






I 



The M^^s^S^^Bl^^^l^^L^^ 



' CANSWNG BEJ-^AWAY? ^ 



N. E. ATHLETIC CONFERENCE 
INCLUDES FIVE COLLEGES 



Will Enforce Freshman and Trans- 
fer Measures. 



The long-awaited New England Col- 
lege Conference on Intercollegiate 
Athletics is a reality. 

Composed of live charter members, 
New Hampshire State. Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, Connecticut State. 
Rhode Island Slate ami the University 
of Maine, it came into being during M 
all-day meeting at the Hotel Bellevue 
Jan. 27 The definite and permanent 
organization followed a previous meet- 
ing held in Hoston on Nov. 26 when 
tentative plans for the organization 
were drawn up. The hotly now is an 
active, going concern. The code ot 
rules adopted will take effect next Sep- 
tember. 

The presidents of the live institutions 
met on Saturday afternoon in this city 
and approved the general outline of 
plans, clearing the way for definite 
action by the athletic and faculty rep- 
resentatives at their session .Ian. 27. 

President K. D. Hetzel of New Hamp- 
shire State College was elected presi- 
dent of the new conference. Prole*** 
E. T. lluddleston of New Hampshire 
State was made secretary. He is also 
chairman of the eligibility committee 
the other members of which are Pro 
lessor Curry S. Hicks of M. A. 0. and 
R. J. Guyer of Connecticut State. 
Not a "Police" Organization. 
The organization, it is made clear, 
will be more a '•gentlenieirs agree- 
ment" than a "police organisation." 
No attempt will he made by members 
to view with suspicion other members. 
Athletes declared eligible by one col- 
lege will be accepted by opponents. 

"The institutions will conduct their 
athletics more or less on an honor 
gystem basis," declared one member. 



llona Fide Students-No 
one shall participate in any intenol- 

legiatea.hletic contest unless he is 
a bona fide matriculated student re- 
gularly enrolled as a candidate for 
a bachelor's degree or its equivalent , 
and doing full work as defined by 
tbe regulations of the department ... 

which he is enrolled. 

Kule 1. Migrant Students- No 
p0nam w bo has participated as a 
college student in any intercollegi- 
ate athletic contest as a member ot 
any college team shall be permitted 
to participate in any intercollegiate 
athletic contests as a member ot any 
teamofanothercollegeuntilhehas 
been matriculate in such institution 
under the conditions as set toitb in 
Rule 1 for a period of one year, in- 
cluding a full season of the sport m 

which he last participated. 

No man who has obtained a var- 
sity letter in another i.slitution 
shall be permitted to participate m 
intercollgiate athletics. 

Rule H. New Students-No per- 
son shall participate in intercol- 
legiate athletics until heshall have 
been in residence one year and shall 
have completed the institutional re- 
quirements to advance him to t he 
next class in addition to meeting 
the entrance requirements of the 

college. 

Note-Attendance .luring summer 

sessions is not counted as residence 

for the purpose of this rule. 

Those rules set forth the principal 
regulations regarding scholastic eligi- 
bility Without much doubt, taken as 
Ihe, are in concert by the several col- 
leges, they mark a forward step tor the 

institutions concerned and will InHuence 
considerably the entire situation in New 

Kngland. 

That the organization is not one in 
which competition for"cbam,,ionsh.ps 

is to be a chief aim was stressed. Ihe 
pnrposeof.be conference is expressed 

. . I. I,. I IS 111 . 



T- -.-■-'•-■' "•H iWM "S 



velopment of these ideals: 

"(a) A department of physical euu- 
„ ui(M1 illl( i athletics having the same 
academic status as other departments 
and having all its employee regular 
members of the college stall. 

"(b) Uniformity in scholarship re- 
tirements for membership on teams, 
in so far as that is possible of agree- 
ment among ihe different institutions. 

"( C ) Uniformity in the regulation 
and development of athletic teams... 
the different colleges." 

There follows the clause quoted above 
which slates the general purpose of the 
organization. 
Other Colleges May be Admitted. 
It was emphasized by a member of 
the conference session Jan 27 that 
the fact .hat each of the live inst.tu- 
llool ,oncerned are S.a.e institutions 
has no significance. The organization 
will not be a closed one. <><her New 
New Kngland colleges willing to sub- 
scribe 10 .he same conditions and seek- 
ing admission to the conference will be 
considered for membership. 

-In short," staled this member, the 
B ee colleges merely have formed a 
,,.,.. lemens agreement to carry on .be.r 

spur, on a high plane. It will not be 
an organization p.imarily competitive 
for title honors. The members doubt- 
less will meet in most branches of sport 
but schedules will in nowise be dic- 
tated bv the conference. 

"To sum up, we believe thai intercol- 
legiate sport should be sport and noth- 
ing else." 

Representatives of the college lef 
J an 27 and 28 for their homes satisfied 
that they had laid the foundation and 
primary structure of an organization 
which should exert an immense amount 
of good on New Kngland college sport. 

Attending the meeting Jan. 27 were: 
President C. I.. Beach, Prof. K. 8. Boh 
lister and R.J. Guyer of Connecticut 
State; Prof. *\ A. McLaughlin and Prof. 



athletics more or less o.. «» - purpose of the conterei.ee >» »v— state; rroi. r. a. ««.»«"* 

system basis," declared one member. pre »nible to tbe code in Ihe fol- Curr> . B . H icks of M. A.C.; Pro • A » ; . 

"If our opponent says a player is elig- 1 ^^^ Grover aIU , U . H. Bryan, of the In. - 

ible, that will be good enough for us. .. Tlie inail > purpose of this conference venjUy of Maine; President B . u. 

By a curious coincidence, that point brinK aboUl a cdoeer cooperation on UeUe , ; prof. W. H. Cowell and 1 rot. 



raa one stressed by Dean Hriggs of 
Harvard in his annual report on 
athletics Jan. 29th when be declared in 
regard to the "Big Three" agreement 
that 'eventually the quesiionaire based 
on universal distrust will defeat its own 
ends. .... There is no questiouaire 
that a dishonest man cannot circum- 
vent." 

The New England College Conference 
Athletics lakes 



is to bring about a closer cooperation on 
the part of the New England colleges 
in the maintenance of high standards 
„f eligibility and in the adminstrat.on 
of intercollegiate athletics. It is under- 
stood that no member of the conference 

la obliged to participate in a niutua 



WINNING POULTRY CLUB 

Amherst Boy Ties Collegiate Men 

William P.Kohng '17. teacher of agii- 
culture at Hadley, acting as the loca 
club leader,trained,witb therooperatloi. 
of Earl Nodine. state club leader, a 
junior poultry judging team. This 
team, consisting of two Hadley boys 
and one Amherst boy took lirst prize at 
Boston for state honors, and duplicated 
their feat at the Madison Square Gar- 
den Poultry Show by carrying off first 
national honors. 

This team was purely sectional un- 
like the other slate teams which were 
made up of the pick ot the whole state. 
They were closely pressed by the team 
from Louisiana, there being only a few 
points difference in the total scores. 
What was more remarkable, this team 
„f schoolboys had ■ score only second 
to thai of Pen... State, the winning col- 
lege team. The schoolboy team was 
judging the same fowl by the same 
standards as the college team. This 
shows the excellent caliber of the wo.k 
being done by some or tbe poultry 

clubs. 

James Parnell, of Amherst, had the | 
highesi individual score, making a to- 
tal of :100 points in all. This score way 
atiewiih the highest score made bf 
anv collegiate man. This high recur: | 
was made by two men of whom wi- 
Charles G. Sharpe of our own college 
This sptaks very well for the work ..I 
Mr. Loring himself and for the work oil 
,he junior poultry clubs as a whole. 

AN. HUS. NOTE 

A pure-bred Guernsey calf has just I 
been sold to tbe head of the herd »| 
Ohio University. It was out of Karl 
Princess, one of tbe best ttaoaaoejl I 
the M. A. C. bams, and several W 
have tried to purchase it, one coiuintj 
from as far away as South Carolina 

Another calf of the same breed ** 
sold to Professor Conklin, also of 01* 
University. 



The Alumni Committee for tb 



Hetzel; Prof. W. H. Cowell and Prof 

E . T . lluddleston of New Hampshire ^ ^ " )f ac(ivUie8 „ bl ,1din. 
State; Prof- F. W. Keaney of LUiode | !„.,„„ al v— Haven today. 

Island State. 



■22.- Frederick V. Waugh was hack 
for a visit to the campus last week end. 



schedule- and, furthermore, there shall He , ias %miu B position as research man 

1 for the New Jersy Bureau of Markets. 



no announcement of conference 
championships by oflicials of the confer- 

Earlier, the preamble sets forth that 
The members of this conference ap 



on Intercollegiate 

marked steps in several directions 

Especially in legislation against the & ^ l)roIll , 1IIK . ellie „t of the National 

"transfer problem," the first concerted ' „ ,_._ 4 ,i.i o( w. Association which 

action by a group of New England col- 



leges on this phase of sport, has the 
organization made an advance which 
will do away with the problem. 

Rule two of tbe code adopted states 
that "No man who has obtained a 
varsity letter la another Institution 
shall be permitted to participate in 
intercollegiate athletics." 

For transfer students who have not 
previously been varsity letter-winners, 
the rule requires one year of residence 
before eligibility. The freshman rule 
also will be enforced. Those measures 
are most easily quoted in the form of 
the rules in which they are embodied: 



Collegiate Athlelic Assoc.a.ion which 
states "That physical training and 
athletics are an esseniial part of educa- 
tion : and that in every college or urn- 
versitv. thedepar.ment of physical edu- 
cation and athletics should be recog- 
nized as a department of collegia!, in- 
struction, directly responsible to the 

college or university ■*»» Brt " t " B - 

"We believe, on the other band, that 

there should be the most careful effort 
made to balance work and interes in 
intercollegiate athletics with the other 
and main factors on tbe educational 



first meeting at New Haven today. N 
members of the committee 9»J°*'*| 
in the Yale hockey game at the U<| 
arena this evening. 

The banquet scrap between the fresH 
men and sophomores at Springriel | 
• 21 . -Emerson Has.am is teaching been banned this year by the ^ 
pillI ,,ry at the Norfolk County Agricul- The classes are now plann ,. C • 
!nral School during the abscense of the banquet for the last of February, 
regular instructor. | a difference! I 




S. S. HYDE GRANGE STOltf 

Pttotan ««rf J * , *?r e,le *" ! Fine Groceries 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Faun* 



9 l'leagant Street (up one flight 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurate!! Replaced D ickinson, Propyl 

Bttttlen Alarm Clocks and other Reliable Makes I I 



programme. 

"We believe that the following pro- 



C*rp*tvter & Morchous*, 
PRINTERS, 

No I, Cook P.a«, ***** ** 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXIII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 21, 1923. 



No. 17 



HOWARD R. GORDON HEADS i CAPT MAC CREADY LEADS DEAN JAMES A BEEBE 0N 
SENIORS FOR NEXT TERM RELAY T1ME T0 W1N 0VER BU " THE IDEALISM 0F SERV1CF " 



Class Officers Elected After Assem- 
bly Last Week. Alger is 
Vice-President. 

Following Assembly last week, the 
Senior class e.ecte officers for the re- 
mainder of the school year. Both How- 
ard "Doc" Gordon of Ipswich and Ma- 
son "Mace" Alger of West liridgewater, 
who were elected president and vice- 
president respectively, are members of 
this season's hockey learn, The former 
is captain of (he team, and in addition 
has played varsity baseball for two 
years, and was a member of tbe Soph- 
Senior Hop Committee in '21. He is a 
member of Lambda Cbi Alpha fratern- 
ity. "Mace" has played varsity fool- 
ball for three years, won his letter last 
spring in track, and is a member of Ihe 
Alpha Gamma Kho fraternity. Alger 
is on tbe .Senate and Gordon is a mem- 
ber of Adelpbia. 

Luther B. Arriugton of Florence was 
elected secretary, having served in a 
similar capacity last year, and having 
been prominent in Academic Activities 
during the last three years. "Airy" 
is a member of Alpha Gamma Kho. 

For treasurer, the class elected Hub- 
ert Fuller of Woburn, and for historian 
Gilbert Irish of Turner, Me. "Bob's" 
activities around campus have been 
!Af7~l£IMhftfU*l*il£lMh 



Friend Also Runs Well at Boston. 

Track Team in Indoor Meet at 

Worcester Thursday. 

The Mass. Aggie relay team partici- 
pated in tbe Knights of Columbus meet 
at Mechanic s lluilding, Boston, on last 
Saturday. We were entered in a dual 
meet with liostoii University, defeating 
them in an interesting and closely 
fought relay race. 

CilYord started ihe ball lolling by uni- 
ting the outside track and handing over 
a small margin to Pierce, who held his 
own and handed over the baton to Tis- 
dale with about Ihe same lead be bad 
received. Tisdale's lead was insutlic- 
ieut against Anderson of B, U. and he 
ended up arrears. MacCready, in the 
anchor position, made up this handi- 
cap, however, and forged ahead, finish- 
ing 20 yards in the lead. The relay 
race with B. U. was lost last year by a 
one yard margin. 

The teams were as follows: 



MASS. Ad. I I 

1st, Gifford 
2nd, Peirce 
trd, Tisdale 
Anchor, Mail ready 



H. u. 

Richards 

Smith 

A nderson 

Matbewson 



Besides this feature Roger Friend 
entered the two-mile handicap run with 
a lKbyard handicap, and by sprinting 
tbe last two laps placed second, win- 
ning over Hagerty of Dorchester. 

KAPPA EPSILON HOUSE IN ItaeCroady and Tisdale """tared 

in the 600 yard but owing to the crowded 
DANGER AS FIRE BREAKS OUT ( . )(n djtJo„ s Ol the track forfeited this e- 

vent to enter the 1000 yard run. Mac- 

Faneuf '23 Loses Books and Notes. Cready placed sixth. MacCready won 

_. 0i ,„ . . .^. „„,, this run at the 15. A. A. meet recently 

Blaze Starts in Wastebasket and _ . 

I with a 2H yard handicap. He is •ened- 
Burns Rapidly. | u)ed ^ mm (|l( . M ,. : A A ,• „,,,., 

Tbe quick action of the members of ; at Boston next Saturbay night in ihe 
Kappa Epsilon saved their fraternity «00 or 1000 yard events, 
house from being destroyed Friday The track team will meet Wore. 



Tech in an indoor meel at Worcester on 
Thursday next. 



night when fire broke out in one of the 
upstairs rooms of the building. 

The fire was discovered at about 10-30 
by Harold B. Shepard. He was on the 
first floor at the time and, smelling 
smoke, rushed up stairs to find the 
room already filled with flames. Many 
of the students were in bed, but they , 
were soon aroused and the Amherst fire Election After Student Forum Assem 



GEORGE E. "RED" EMERY '24 
CHOSEN A CHEERLEADER 



department was called. They arrived 

in good time, but the blaze was even 

then under control, with the aid of men 

and extinguishers from neighboring 

houses. 

The room was occupied by John B. 

Faneuf '23, who lost some valuable 

'•hemistry notes and all his chemistry 

hooks, among other things which were 

in his desk. 
The fraternity had only recently , this year's Aggie Kevue, have also been 

moved into the house, and although ! worthy of note. He is a member of 

the house was insured there was no in- Sigma Phi Kpsilon. Kmery succeeds 

Hurauce on the books and furniture, i ■ office 

The fire appeared to have originated in 

a wastebasket in the room. 



bly, Wednesday 

At last Wednesday"* Assembly, the 
student body elected George B. "Bed" 
Emery,'24 of Marlborough, as college 
cheerleader for the corning year. Kmery 
was on the freshman football s<)iiad his 
first year in college, and has since 
served as a class cheer-leader. His 
activities in dramatics, especially in 



Excellent Sermon Preached in Sun- 
day Chapel by Dean of Boston 
University. 

At Sunday Chapel on Feb. 18, DOM 
.lames A. Beebe of Hoston University 
gave an interesting seimon on the pies 
ent situations of mankind and ol ihe 
world. 

The speaker showed that the clash 
a.xl irritation between modem nations 
is merely an attempt to answer ihai eld 
i|.iestion of supremacy. The cuiislant 
struggle between capital am) labor is 
due also to this human ambition fol su- 
preme powei . 

Dean Heebe pointed out the only 
means of correcting t his social problem. 
Tbe people ol the world should, b.v 
means ol religion, enter into a new atli- 
tude of service !-i others. Moreover, 
happiness in human relal ioiishi psw ailed 
for the coming ol (bis new spirit ol ser- 
vice. By way of illustration, Dean 
Beebe showed that all of the p r o f esO 
Ions, except thooo et the balneal Baa 
and manutacturer, are already a part of 
(bis idealism of service to others. 



COMMITTEE FOR HIGH 

SCHOOL DAY CHOSEN 

The High School Day Committee has 

been appoinied and is as lollows: 

Faculty- -Prof. ICaud, Prof, links. Mr. 

Walts and Mr. Mellen. 
Students — Kryle Johnson '23. Ilalsey 

Davis '24. Adrian Harnes '96, and ken 

neth Tripp '20. 

NEW ALUMNI DIRECTORY 

SOON TO GO TO PRESS 

The alumni directory which has been 
in a stale ol preparation lor many weeks 
is at last to be sent to press Willi assis- 
tance of the fraternity secretaries and 
the response from most of tbe alumni 
(be dala gathered is almost eoinplete. 
This directory will be correct to Feb. 16, 
19SS; Ihai is, after thai dale in all prob- 
ability no names will be added. 



has proven tbe best cbeer-leader the 
college has had in recent years. 



DELTA PHI GAMMA HOLDS 
ANNUAL VALENTINE DANCE 

Delta Phi GaBBM held ils annual 
Valentine dance last Saturday evening 
in Memorial Hall. Music for the dane- 
lai was tiirnislied by Woodworth, Far 
ker. Adams "ami Dunbar. The ball was 
decorated prettily and simply. Large 
hearts suspended from the chandeliers 
contained many smaller hearts for tbe 
special "Sbowerof Hearts'' dance which 
followed the grand march. Forty couples 
attended. Miss Skinner, Dean and Mrs. 
Macbmer, and Prof, aud Mrs Hicks 
acted as chaperones. 



'16. — Franklin W. Marsh now resides 
at 1301 Ferry Place, N. W., D. C 



RHODE ISLAND BEATEN IN 
A FAST HOME GAME 24-16 

Bolh Teams Use Good Five-man De- 
fense and Pass Well. Jensen 
and Marsh-man Feature. 

I.asl Sali.nlav alternoon (lie Mass. 
Aggie baaketeei id . n<- ■ t iheir 

fastest exhibitions of plaj of ;:»e season 

on the Drill Hall Hour when they took 

a win from tbe Rhode [aland Hnate live 

by the HON Of 21-lb. The visitors came 
hen with a big reputation and the 
goods to back it, but (hey found strong 

opposition awaiting them, after a tea* 

hour ettIO ride in cold wealbei 

From the Start Ihe name was a whirl- 
wind to Watea, both teams displaying 
(heir heal passing game, bill the shots 

of both sides were a little wild. Fer- 

ranti lailed loslarl scoring in the lirst 
tew minutes «.| play when be missed 

both tree shots for a foal hy Rhode le- 

land. A few seconds later, however, 
atlei some tier 01 passing and good 
teamwork Hike broke through and p.U 
I he home team in the lead with a pretty 

shot Mom near the basket. Noli ■ 

than thirty seconds late. J. Ilasla.n 
sunk a nice -hot tor Rhode Island which 
was followed almost immediately hj 
Jensens' basket. A foul which Ferranti 
shot made score J-3, still in the visitors' 
fovor, and it was followed by a haul 
SOOT basket h] Jensen which gave 

Rhode [eland more ot a lead. 

The score kept gradually glowing, 
but at no time during the lirst half did 
Aggie leg;. in her lead. About the mid- 
dle ul die period Samuels went in for 
Ferranti and started oil by shooting a 
basket unassisted. His good lortune 

prompted Captain Manhmai lupli- 

cate it bringing the scoie '.»-*. siillin 

fevor ot k. i.. Barrowt mfeaed two 

chances to sink free tries and Jensen 
• d one in from undei the basket. 
A moment later be hooped it again, 
pulling K. I. in the bad by a live point 
margin, which was cut down 10 three 
by two fouls which Uaiiows dropped in. 
Continued on p»g« S 

WILLARD K. FRENCH TO 

LEAVE COLLEGE APRIL 1 



J. 8. Bailey,Now at Iowa State Univ ., 
to Fill Vacancy. 

Willaid K. PR BOb, assistant pTOfeasol 
of Pomology, has tendered his resigna 
t.ou and wiil leave college on ihe lirst 
,,l Apiil. He intends to leach at W'oi 
Cooler and conduct ■ forming enterprise 
of his own at Sterling. 

J. 8. Bailey w to till the raeaacj to 

be left by Prof. French of the Pomology 
Dipt, on April lirst. Mr. Hailey, a 
graduate of Michigan, and at present 
teaching at Iowa State College, will 
probably be vested with the position of 
investigation of Pomology. 






I 



I 






' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 21, 1923. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 21, 1923. 



Athletics 



R. I. BASKETBALL GAME 

Continued from page * 



HOCKEY TEAM FALLS BEFORE 
SPEEDY YALE SEXTET 4-1 



The half ended with tbe BOOTS 13-10 for 
Rhode Island. 

The AK«ie quints! tightened op In tbs 

second half and it was evident that 
the name had bjf no means been won. 

Hale started the b«11 rolling (or rather 
■Inking) when lie netted a beauty from 

the center of the Hour. Hlmde Island 
failed to Hhoot a foul ami Harrows suc- 
ceeded in getting. One which tied up the 
the score at t hirtc